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    The First Triumvirate

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    The First Triumvirate "3 paragraphs, why did Caesar, Pompey and Crassus need the (amicittia) First Triumvirate." Crassus' motives for the need for the First Triumvirate according to Scullard are as follows, "Crassus supported a request from a company of tax-gatherers that the Senate should adjust a bad bargain which they had made in contracting for the taxes of Asia." His supporters had found out that Asia had been 'economically raped' due to the Mithradatic wars, where Asia was sandwiched

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    Explain the formation and the break down of the First Triumvirate The formation of the First Triumvirate took place because of the political motives and the personal motives of the three ruthlessly ambitious power brokers in Rome. These men required the co-operation of the other two in order to further their political careers. During the time of the First Triumvirate many extraordinary powers where obtained and in some cases these where unprecedented. There are some key factors that have to

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    The First and Second Triumvirate

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    The First Triumvirate and The Second Triumvirate The First Triumvirate and The Second Triumvirate were two very different systems of leadership considering the people that were involved. The people that were each had their own way of ruling, which caused complications and which also caused triumph in certain cases. The First Triumvirate did not accomplish as much as the Second Triumvirate due to difficulties among each other. Julius Caesar, an effective

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    Prior to Julius Caesar completely seizing control of the Roman Republic, various Consuls of Rome took advantage of their power and utilized it to be in sole control of the Republic. Two prominent examples include Marius and Sulla, who rose up the ranks of Roman politics to Consul and disheveled Rome. While these two men provide a sneak peak of what Julius Caesar would do, they did not come to close to matching Caesar’s influence on the Roman Republic. Caesar separated himself from these two men

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    friends while really jealous of you” (Cicero 42). What Cicero is implying is that everyone is jealous of everyone else, and by making friends to become consul you also attract enemies who also desire power. Cicero describes three of these opponents “First, those whom you have attacked; second, those who dislike you without definite reason; third those who are warm friends of your competitors” (Cicero 42). One cannot please all in Rome, Cicero recounts, and because of this bitter struggle over power

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    Senate was already weak for allowing Pompey to exploit the military and political system to his own advantage and hence to achieve this power, while in the final years of the Republic (which were evidently most damaging to the system) when the First Triumvirate was formed, the other individuals Caesar and Crassus also played a major part in the harm of the Republic. Now what the Romans had feared most all along was well and truly underway.

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    Caesar idolized power, leadership, and politics. Early in his quest for power Caesar was a student of the great Crassus. Eventually and gradually, Caesar built his own power, and than he made an alliance with Pompey and Crassus known as the first triumvirate. Later on, Caesar ended up more powerful then the other two men and became the last man standing. Julius Caesar started to take part in many small leadership positions, which eventually led to Caesar’s establishing the trust of society and the

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    doomed with a senate which does not care about its people. There seems to be no hope. But then comes a young man who has ideas of equality that could save the republic. That man is Julius Caesar. Conqueror of Gaul, Crosser of the Rubicon, member of the First Tiumbarant, Caesar was a brilliant politician and general. At the time, Rome was governed by Pompey and the senate. Both were in favor bettering themselves and not the poor people. Caesar was in favour of improving life for the lower class. This was

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    The Rise Of Julius Caesar

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    In the first century BC, Roman military commander Julius Caesar, engendered by his obsession with complete supremacy and glory, rose to prominence in the Roman political scene by manipulating those who surrounded him, ultimately reorientating the structure of Roman governance permanently. Born into Roman nobility, Caesar initially gained power by taking advantage of the Roman political climate with both his military and oratory skills. Gradually, by way of a series of calculative political moves

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    which allowed him to make changes to the Roman Republic. For example, in 69 B.C. Julius Caesar was elected military tribune, after displaying bravery during his kidnapping by pirates while crossing the Aegean Sea. The military tribune position was the first step in having a political career at the time and necessary to begin developing his influence. Next, Julius Caesar took on the role of Quaestor in 69 B.C. Throughout this position Julius 1 Caesar both supervised the financial affairs of the state and

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