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Free First Opium War Essays and Papers

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    Gregorio Lopez Mr. Locks British Lit 4/7/14 The First Opium War and its aftermath on Chinese To the normal Chinese man during the early 19th century, opium was nothing more than a luxury that only those of higher power or influence could indulge themselves in. Yet by the middle of the 19th century opium had become a commodity that everyone could have and that at the same time they seemed to need. Even though it was now such a big part of the normal chinese culture, it did not benefit the people nor

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    The First Opium War

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    The First Opium War or the Anglo-Chinese War fought in 1839 to 1842 between Britain and China was the product of a century long imbalance between the two country’s trades and had long lasting impacts on China. Britain was a nation addicted to tea, a delicacy that could only be grown in China and the silver they spent on it began to drain the treasury. The counterattack for Britain was opium. The ill effects of the drug soon became apparent, as addiction problems worsened; officials in both China

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    The First Anglo-Chinese War as an Opium War The Chinese customarily calls the Anglo-Chinese War 1839-1842 the Opium War because from their point of view, the opium trade was the main cause of the war. From the British standpoint, the motive for the war was not opium prohibition but rather the repeated insults and humiliation; the British had received from the Chinese government. They claimed that the conflict between China and Britain had been brewing for many decades. Even without opium

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    The First Opium War

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    The First Opium War between the British and China were fought over the countries conflicts in trade and dissimilar perspectives in diplomatic relations. One of the greatest factors of the war was opium, which had caused great instability of the socioeconomic status of China preceding the war and China’s actions in ending the opium import from the British was known to have sparked the war. China has been greatly criticized for provoking this Anglo Chinese War, against the British Empire, one of the

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    The Treaty of Nanjing

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    At the end of the Opium War, China was left defeated. While the loss severely undermined the Qing Dynasty's power, little did they know that their loss would have serious repercussions. The emperor signed a treaty with the British that would later be known as one of the “Unequal Treaties” made in China during this period. The treaty in question was named the treaty of Nanjing (also known as the treaty of Nanking). This treaty would have lasting effects even into recent history. In the 17th century

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    Opium War Analysis

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    is the human body of this metaphor, as Cocteau points out the destruction and chaos opium can cause in the body of man; it does the same to the well-being of China during the early to mid eighteen-hundreds. The aim of this paper is to discuss a key issue in which plagued China in their opposition to opium trade leading up to and during the Opium War. While there are many important issues related to China’s opium problem, the scope of this paper will be strategic errors. It is important to note

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    Opium

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    Opium Opium- an addictive drug originally used as a painkiller. It is obtained from the unripe seeds of the opium poppy and can be made into substances that a person can smoke causing relaxation, alleviated anxiety, and a state of euphoria. Continued use of the drug also induces deterioration to the mind and body of a person eventually causing death. The substance was therefore stated illegal in China during the late 18th Century yet consistently smuggled into the country via British merchant

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    first

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    - The first Opium War ( 1839-1842 ) War on opium trade Chinese authorities will respond more efficiently . The Emperor Daoguang (1821-1851) seeks advice from a dozen experts before making a decision. In the courtyard, there are supporters and opponents of opium : some want to legalize traffic or rather the Chinese production , and others see the financial problem that the drug will ask China. A debate will commit for two years. One of these reports will be presented by the Governor General of the

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    the year 1600 in the subcontinent. The main reason for entering the subcontinent was trade, making money and importing spices from South Asia. It was the Portuguese who used all their skills and their navigational technology to enter this great area first, and start trade in the most profitable manner they could. East India Company entered as an early and old-fashioned venture, and conducted a separate business with their private stockholders. Their approach and their trade lasted for many years until

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    The History of European Merchants in China

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    Chester Springs, Quoted in Edgar Holt, The Opium Wars in China: 102 John Darwin, After Tamerlane: The Global History of Empire: 431 Moon-Ho Jung. "Seditious Subjects: Race, State Violence, and the U.S. Empire." Journal of Asian American Studies 14, no. 2 (2011): 221-247 Bachman David. Bureaucracy, economy, and leadership in China : the institutional origins of the great leap forward: 97 Kroeber and Kluckholn, Culture, pp. 25 and 29. Chris Tudda, A Cold War Turning point: Nixon and China, Political

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