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Free Firebreak Essays and Papers

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    Wildfire Mitigation

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    Wildfire Mitigation Thesis: Politicians are proposing sweeping changes in bills, which have caused great controversy, in efforts to correct the problems that the Forest Service has faced in restoration projects. Are these bills necessary or is there a better solution that politicians are overlooking? Introduction: Humans have been changing the Western forests' fire system since the settlement by the Europeans and now we are experiencing the consequences of those changes. During the summer

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    As people of the twenty-first century, we are all too familiar with the frequent occurrence of wildfires in our nation’s forests. Each year millions of acres of woodlands are destroyed in brutal scorches. It has been estimated that 190 million acres of rangelands in the United States are highly susceptible to catastrophic fires (www.doi.gov/initiatives/forest.html.). About a third of these high-risk forests are located in California (www.sfgate.com). These uncontrollable blazes not only consume our

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    Prescribed Fire and White-Tailed Deer

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    White-tail deer are very unique animals that live in many different climates and ecosystems. They rely on most of the natural resources in woodland and grassland environments. These different environments can be manipulated greatly by the use of fire. Since deer are very important in the people best interest economically with the sport of hunting generating billions of dollars a year in the U.S., it is up to the people to help maintain the environment in which they live. Performing prescribed burns

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    Malibu and Yosemite Benefits from Wildfires

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    Malibu and Yosemite share similar ecosystem, which encourages wildfires and periodic firestorms. In his book Ecology of Fear, Mike Davis argues that Malibu should burn because wildfires are a part of its history. To illustrate his point, he relates numerous historical events from the first settlement of the region to modern days. Despite the high frequency of wildfires in Malibu, humans have continued to settle there in droves. Those settlers have fought the fires, which has done nothing but augment

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    How Controlled Burns Improve Forestry

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    Thousands upon thousands of acres are lost in forest fires every year. We always hear about the dramatic losses caused by forest fires and are often concerned by them. There are so many horrible effects from fires and most of them affect so many people. Studies have shown that out of all of the different methods to decrease fire damage, prescribed burns are the most affective. Many people would argue that they are not as affective because they cause so many health problems. Although that is

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    Firestorms

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    A firestorm is a true force of nature. It is a wildfire that has its own wind system. There can be thunderclouds, rain, lightning, and even fire tornadoes inside the firestorm. In the past seven years, 19 firestorms have been documented. These storms have destroyed 1,388 structures, burned down 3.5 million acres, and killed 24 people. To understand firestorms one needs to understand fire. A fire needs three things to thrive: oxygen, fuel and heat. This is what experts call a fire triangle. Heat starts

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    fire could easily spread from house to house and become a fire hard to contain (Alagna 12). Firefighting consisted of very simple techniques before the Great Fire. If there was a fire, designated workers pulled down houses with hooks to form a firebreak which would stop the fire from spreading any further. Other than the tools used to pull down the houses, there were not really any other firefighting devices (Alagna 13-14). Furthermore, on the night of September ... ... middle of paper ...

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    The Great Fire of London

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    Throughout recorded history, fires have been known to cause great loss of life, property, and knowledge. The Great Fire of London was easily one of the worst fires mankind has ever seen causing large scale destruction and terror. Samuel Pepys described the fire as “A most malicious bloody flame, as one entire arch of fire of above a mile long… the churches, houses and all on fire and flaming at once, and a horrid noise the flames made.” (Britain Express 1). Although it started as a small fire

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    The Great Fire of London

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    As once posted on Funky, a blog about the latest news, "Fire from the heart of London spreads through the blood of it's veins, making history from ashes" (“Metaphor…” quote #6). In 1666, the Great Fire of London destroyed and turned everything in its path to ashes and is remembered as one of the most historical devastations of Great Britain. The September fire lasted approximately four days. There are a number of different reasons why this fire was so destructive including a lack of response, building

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    Adrian Shocks Mrs. Daniels English 3B 1/23/14 Why the Bomb Was Dropped The United States dropping the atomic bomb on Hiroshima was a decision with immense thought behind it. To this day there are arguments that support both sides of the decision. In the end dropping the bomb was the best option for the United States. Unfortunately there wasn’t an abundance of options and dropping the bomb was the most appealing in all aspects. In the end dropping the bomb was the best option for the United States

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