Free Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 Essays and Papers

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Free Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 Essays and Papers

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    The balancing act of family and work can be very difficult at times. At some point in everyone’s life, he or she will need to take time off of work to deal with family matters. The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) of 1993 was created to help employees find a balance between the challenging demands of work and home. This Act allows eligible workers that require time off for personal reasons or family emergencies up to twelve weeks of unpaid leave. During the 1992 presidential campaign, Governor

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    The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA) provides certain employees with up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave and job protection for childbirth, adoption or foster care; to care for a seriously ill child, spouse, or parent; or for an employee’s own serious illness (Cañas & Sondak, 2011). It also requires that their group health benefits remain intact during the unpaid leave of absence. The employee must have worked for the employer for at least a year and must have earned 1,250 hours of service

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    Situation A. The Family Medical Leave Act, deals with the laws regarding “eligible” employees taking off up to twelve weeks of unpaid leave for their child's birth, adopting a child, taking care of an ill family member, or if they themselves have a serious health condition (Vikesland, 2006). In order to be considered an eligible employee, you must work for a company that employs at least fifty people, have worked there for a year and have worked a minimum of 1,250 hours in that year. “The employee

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    Family Medical Leave Act

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    Important Facts about Family Medical Leave Act The Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) was introduced in Congress by the National Partnership for Women & Families every year from 1984 to 1993 and was blocked repeatedly every year. Congress passed the legislation in 1991 and 1992, but it was vetoed both times by President George H.W. Bush. Finally in 1993, newly-elected President William J. Clinton signed the bill into law. The law was passed with the best of intentions by both those who opposed and

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    The Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) was eight long years in the making. After many bitter debates between the Republicans and Democrats, Congress passed the Act on February 4, 1993. President Clinton signed the measure into law the following day. The Act became effective on August 5, 1993. The Act required employers with fifty or more employees within a seventy-five mile radius to offer eligible employees up to twelve weeks of unpaid leave during a twelve month period for a variety of medical

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    their children. The current policies regarding maternity leave are extremely outdated and need to be reformed to accommodate mothers in this day and age. If I could create a law in America, it would be a law upgrading the Family and Medical Leave Act, requiring all employers to give their employees 16 weeks of paid maternity leave. The current policy on maternity leave is that both men and women are entitled to 12 weeks of unpaid leave for the birth of a child, adoption a child, or the serious

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    Paternal Leave Introduction The father's role is crucial in the development of the child from day one and, as has already been said in the past, his relationship with a newborn is different from the mother, and is constructed through interactions in complex levels such as touch or sound. It reminds us that there is still much to do in the field of paternity also with regard to men. Fatherhood, however, does not seem to be properly covered by American law, which in many cases does not provide the

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    On August 5, 1993 the amended Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA), was intended to help employees have a work life balance. This accomplishment placed the United Stated ahead of major barriers for the fair labor laws. Before having the amended FMLA put into place, employees were rarely granted job protection for caring for newborns, relatives and personal medical illness. With the new amended act, it allowed employees to take a leave of absence from their job and allowed protection from being

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    between their work responsibilities and their families. In order to work they must make arrangements for their children and elderly family members who need assistance. They address these conflicts through a variety of child-care, after-school, and eldercare arrangements. But sometimes when a child is seriously ill, an aging parent’s health deteriorates suddenly, or a baby is born or adopted, these daily arrangements are no longer adequate. At such times of family need, an employee simply must take time

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    Law Competency 310.1.5 Labor and Employment Law Situation A – Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 is a federal law that was put into place to protect an employee's job for a leave due to personal or family illness. It allows an employee to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave to care for themselves, or someone in their family, to assist with serious medical conditions. During this leave the employee's benefits, position, health benefits and pay are

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