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Free Falstaff Essays and Papers

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    Shakespeare consistently contrasts the opposing worldviews of Falstaff and Prince Hal. Shakespeare portrays Falstaff as the old, overweight drunk who lives only to enjoy himself in the present. In contrast, Shakespeare shows Hal to be the sometimes irresponsible, nevertheless, intelligent and heroic prince whose entire life and character is about planning and preparing not only himself, but also others for the future. Yet, while Falstaff engages in illegal activity to maintain his own pleasure, regardless

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    Looking at an overview of Falstaff, he has traits that of a villain, yet in King Henry IV, he is arguably one of the most beloved character, responsible for comedic relief. However I believe this is Shakespeare making a statement, and masking it behind humour. You see, it can be said that Falstaff is a politically driven character, in which everything he does is with purpose, whether that be financial gain or

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    A Critique in Lewis Mumford’s Idea on Transportation In this essay I will prove why Lewis Mumford's essay, "The Highway and the City" is invalid. Specifically, I will critique Mumford's ideas on the significance of pedestrian modes of transportation as opposed to private motor vehicle transportation. I will also critique Mumford's ideas regarding sociability, the benefit of agriculture in urban areas, the overall advantages in replacement of mass transportation in both long and short distances and

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    Henriad by Shakespeare

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    Falstaff is often left out of the conversation or treated as an object when people discuss Shakespeare’s “Henriad.” The conversation has grown to include Falstaffian supporters and those who continue to objectify him. On the one hand, critics like Harry Berger, author of “The Prince’s Dog: Falstaff and the Perils of Speech-Prefixity,” argues that Falstaff’s concealed motives are only brought to light through the characters speech. On the other hand, critics like Robert Bell, author of “The Anatomy

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    Falstaff and Hotspur have opposing belief systems towards honour. Falstaff holds a practical view of honour, valuing life more then honour (Beveridge 10). Hotspur views honour as life, willing to give up his life for honour (Beveridge 10). Although both beliefs are completely different they share some similarities. Both characters present their beliefs with extreme passion and consistency. Another characteristic shared by the two beliefs of honour is the selfish motive behind them. By dissecting

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    King Henry Iv Part 1

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    underlying theme throughout the play. Through characterization Shakespeare explores moral conflict, and passage three is a prime example of Falstaff’s enduring moral disorder. By this stage in the play Hal has ‘reformed’, moved away from his former mentor Falstaff and become a good and honourable prince. Hal’s remark to his father indicates a now strong, independent mind, predicting that Douglas and Hotspur will not accept Henry’s offer because of their love for fighting. Henry’s reply in turn indicates a

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    Essay on William Shakespeare's Fools

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    any Shakespearean play that I have read) is Falstaff in I Henry IV. In "The Fortunes of Falstaff," Wilson claims that Falstaff is the embodiment of the vice of Vanity: he is cowardly in battle, proud and pretentious, dishonest, conniving, lacks respect for the property of others, and is concerned only with wine, tavern wenches, and comfort. It would be easy for a reader (or play-watcher) unfamiliar with Shakespeare to conclude, in our own time, that Falstaff has been included in the drama solely to

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    Act II Scene III contributes tremendously to the characterization of Hotspur. In this scene, Hotspur and his wife, Lady Percy, engage in a heated discussion about the state of their relationship. This scene is important to the play for two reasons. It evolves the plot and it provides a glimpse into Hotspur’s domestic life. Before receiving the letter from the nobleman declining his request to aid in the war efforts, the war was just in its early planning stages; now that Hotspur is worried of the

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    it does not obey all typical conventions of a Shakespearean comedy as noticeable differences in the plot show. Key parts of the play in which Shakespeare creates the main humour are the scenes in which the wives manage to humiliate and deceive Falstaff, a fat knight with a devious mind and inflated ego. A convention used repeatedly in this play to create verbal, and physical humour, is disguise and misunderstanding. Within the category of disguise and misunderstanding comes incongruity and

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    and it is useless to the dead. Therefore, in the upcoming battle Falstaff will not, as characters in heroic plays had done for centuries, sacrifice himself for love of country. He will instead look out for his own self interest, and attempt to earn acclaim from the actions of others. However, this does not make his character a

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