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    The Erotics of the Technological Body

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    sexual desire and invested of techno-erotic impulses. Engines and machines have been described through sexual metaphors and have been made an object of cult by artistic movements such as Italian Futurism. The passage from the industrial to the digital age has modified our relationship to technology and the awareness of our body through the use of technological objects –yet techno-eroticism still remains a central drive. Why is technology a source of erotic thrill? A central motivation is the relationship

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    Smut, Erotic Reality/obscene Ideology

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    Smut, Erotic Reality/Obscene Ideology In the book Smut, Erotic Reality/ Obscene Ideology , by Murray Davis (1983), the author expresses the idea that the best source for studying human sexuality objectively is "soft core", rather than “hard core” pornography. (Davis p. xix). The purpose of this paper is to critique Davis's claim and to study what understanding of human sexuality someone might have if they used some other resource that is available today, in this case the Internet. Davis

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    Violence as Displacement: The Erotic Gaze in Gladiator and Fight Club On the screen, two men writhe and grapple on the cold concrete floor. One man on top, holding the other from behind in a chokehold that causes the man on the bottom to succumb to the more powerful man. The dialogue by the narrator states that, “Sometimes all you could hear were the flap, hard packing sounds over the yelling, or the wet choke when someone caught their breath and sprayed” (Fight Club). The soundtrack consists

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    Women as Victims in the Media

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    portraying women victims as young, unmarried, beautiful and innocent. Their deaths were portrayed as resulting from a loss of innocent, generally through premarital sexual contact. The descriptions of the dead bodies were graphic and occasionally erotic in nature. (Cohen, 277-306) These descriptions came at a time when the literacy rate was rising rapidly and the relatively free attitude towards premarital sex was changing to a more restrictive ...

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    Sexuality in Shakespeare's As You Like It

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    Like It In a romantic forest setting, rich with the songs of birds, the fragrance of fresh spring flowers, and the leafy hum of trees whistling in the wind, one young man courts another. A lady clings to her childhood friend with a desperate and erotic passion, and a girl is instantly captivated by a youth whose physical features are uncannily feminine. Oddly enough, the object of desire in each of these instances is the same person. In As You Like It, William Shakespeare explores the homoerotic

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    relationship with his husband. She is going to call the Stevensons because, she and her husband have nothing more to discuss about. Michael?s way of looking on women as mere bodies could suggest a kind of degradation?which is to define a woman only as an erotic or sexual figure. There is an irony in the relationship of the couple which is the bloodless horror from the truth expressed that somehow the things are not, and never have been, what they used to pretend about themselves. It is clear in the

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    that they have sought ways to prepare it earlier in the play" ("Duke Vincentio and the Illusion of Comedy or All's Not Well that Ends Well," SQ, 22 [1971], 31). These attempts, based on a culturally specific conception of matrimony as prompted by erotic desire, disregard other textually prominent motivations for marriage grounded in Renaissance moral, social, and financial concerns. Ann Jennalie Cook, comparing contemporary notions of marriage to those of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries,

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    Homosexuality

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    Homosexuality No one knows exactly how homosexuality entered into human history. I would imagine that the practices associated with the erotic attraction of people to one's own gender have been around since the dawn of humanity. The earliest accounts of homosexual behavior seem to be found in ancient pagan religious practices. At least, the pagans included homosexuality in the worship of various gods. Whether the inclusion in worship was because the practice was already a part of the society-at-large

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    believed she was portraying sexual imagery. “O’Keefe’s depictions of flowers in strict frontality and enlarged to giant scale were entirely original in character . . . the view into the open blossoms evoked an image of the female psyche and invited erotic associations.” (Joachimides 47) O’Keefe denies these allegations and says that she “magnified the scale of the flower only to ensure people would notice them.” (Haskell 203) O’Keefe’s artwork was misinterpreted because of cultural prejudice, her non-traditional

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    who "felt" too much and somehow allowed these feelings to overcome her. This type of action would drive a person to madness, just as Ophelia is driven into her madness. This conclusion would seem to suggest that her madness stemmed from some sort of erotic passion between herself and Hamlet. This is the type of interpretation that is given to the audience in many movie versioesult of erotomania. Elaine Showalter creates an argument that is predominantly based on the idea that Ophelia's madness is one

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    Pornography - Sex Should Not be a Spectator Sport Some adults recall the days in the early Sixties with a certain nostalgia, as a time when people were still aware of the distinction between pornography and erotic art, and when erotic books and films could pass the censor only if a case could be made for their artistic value. Everything changed very suddenly, according to the poet Philip Larkin: Sexual intercourse began In nineteen sixty-three. Between the end of

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    and Dido’s passionate affair, he showed how the unfortunate mixture of lust, love, and divine intervention could result in tormented hearts. The word “Love” in the context of the above quote refers to the desire the couple felt for each other, an erotic, impulsive force that consumed their lives and made them forget their responsibilities as leaders. Dido’s suicide further shows how this force drove her heart to the extreme. However, I believe that Love in the purest, unselfish sense can drive the

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    to admit that I am not too far off. He writes, “ … the aesthetic is made one with the erotic” (415). But then the essay takes an odd turn. This self-gratifying fulfillment becomes a replacement of either a missing sister or a dead daughter (the latter of which I don’t understand because Faulkner’s daughter did not die - was she perhaps very sick as an infant?) It seems that Bleikasten is now associating the erotic with the familial - not that incest is an inappropriate topic of conversation. However

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    myth novel filled with terror, horror, and evil, the story is a thinly veiled disguise of the repressed sexual mores of the Victorian era.  If we look to critical interpretation and commentary to win support for such a thesis, we find it aplenty "For erotic Dracula certainly is.  'Quasi-pornography' one critic labels it.  Another describes it as a 'kind of incestuous, necrophilious, oral-anal-sadistic all-in-wrestling matching'.  A sexual search of the novel unearths the following:  seduction, rape,

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    Shakespeare's Othello - Loving Desdemona

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    know what it means to be unfaithful; the word “whore” is not in her vocabulary. She is defenseless against the charges brought against her because she does not even comprehend them, cannot believe that anyone would imagine such things. Her love, both erotic and chaste, is of that transcendent wholesomeness common to several late Shakespearean heroines [. . .]. Her “preferring” Othello to her father, like Cordelia’s placing her duty to a husband before that to a father, is not ungrateful but natural and

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    Kustom Kar Kommandos

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    being only about 3 minutes long, is filled with many points of thought involving the nature of this relationship. The short itself is about a man simply buffing and admiring his car, but with the use of music, fades, and slow pans this becomes an erotic event. Playing “Dream Lover” from the start, Kenneth Anger has found the sensual side of communicating with an automobile, while still keeping the movie free of blatant symbolic imagery. The scene of the short is a very plain stage. A pink backdrop

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    fixation with Caddy as well as a textured representation of their relationship. Sexual language pervades his inner consciousness - scents, sounds and colors represent his passion and desire. Elements of nature, when associated with his sister, become erotic; the tiers of description, no matter how seemingly mundane, tend to be steeped in sexuality. Quentin's lapse into past events with Caddy begins in the midst of typical conversation with his friends as they drive through town. His attention to

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    Sex on the Internet

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    naked bodies. Pornography has always been a part of life and yet it has never been so readily available as what it is now. Erotic stories, explicit pictures, XXX- rated films and modern day magazines, are all part of the stimulus material which is known as "pornography" or as it is legally put, "obscenity." Is it ethically right for our children to be looking at this erotic material at such an early age? Do we have a twisted sense of morals if we support pornography? Or is it just a natural part

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    Roman Times

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    MOM IN THE JACUZZI It was not until I read my first erotic story about mothers and sons, that my Mom became my object of desire. I cannot describe my Mother as a sex goddess. She is the typical forty-something, with brown hair and eyes, about five foot and two inches tall, and weights 130 lbs. Mom just oozes motherhood. Her one enduring physical quality is her big breast. They're not large. They're just really nice. So now every son's dilemma, how do you seduce your mother? I kept a small collection

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    play is the cross dressing and role playing. The central love interest between Rosalind and Orlando calls into question the conventional wisdom about men's and women's gender roles and challenges our preconceptions about these roles in courtship, erotic love, and beyond. At the heart of this courtship is a very complex ambiguity which it is difficult fully to appreciate without a production to refer to. But here we have a man (the actor) playing a woman (Rosalind), who has dressed herself up as

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