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    Erich Fromm

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    sense of Fromm's orientations Erich Fromm 1900 - 1980 Biography 8Erich Fromm was born in 1900 in Frankfurt, Germany. His father was a business man and, according to Erich, rather moody. His mother was frequently depressed. His childhood was not very happy. 8Like Jung, Erich came from a very religious family, in his case orthodox Jews. Fromm himself later became what he called an atheistic mystic. 8In his autobiography, Beyond the Chains of Illusion, Fromm talks about two events in his

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    Philosopher Erich Fromm was born in the early 20th century and could witness all of its major developments (Cherry). Not only did it bring technological progress and new ideologies, but also bitter fruits of war unseen by mankind before. He contemplated the motives behind aggression and violence which led him to the study of psychology and sociology (Cherry). Fromm’s last work, “To Have or to Be” (1976), is the culmination of his strive to find and explain the purpose of human life. He perceived

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    Erich Fromm was an influential German psychoanalyst and philosopher in the 20th Century. One of his most important works is the text, “To Have or to Be?” This book highlights Fromm’s opinion of the difference of “having” and “being” and why they are both important aspects to one’s life. The two different concepts have been widely debated between philosophers and analysts throughout the years. The term “having” seems to be the easier mode to define, while “being” becomes more complicated to outline

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    Necessary Rebellion Erich Fromm is a psychoanalyst and sociologist who wrote many books and journals over the years. Fromm closely studied other psychologists such as Freud and Marx, and he published analytical works on both many other theories. In his essay, “Disobedience as a Psychological and Moral Problem,” Fromm explains that as humans we start out with disobedience, and make it into something horrible—something for which we must repent, feel sorry for, and act as if we won’t do it again (621)

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    One cannot be obedient to one’s power without being disobedient to another. In his article, “Disobedience as a Psychological and Moral Problem,” Erich Fromm argues people obey authority to feel safe. When one obeys, they become an ambiguous part of a whole, no longer accountable for actions or left on their own. In Ian Parker’s article, “Obedience,” analyzing Milgram's experiment, he claims people obey orders when there is no second option. According to Parker, if someone obeys an order, but there

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    Introduction All of Alice’s life, through the eyes of Erich Fromm, has been an attempt at escaping freedom. Her life up until this point has been an attempt in futility, trying to run from the freedom that haunts her and her husband’s life for that matter. They are both very successful and to the eyes of everyone around them, the epitome of the American dream. Both of them professors and researches, have risen to the heights of academia, when Alice’s disease begins to destroy everything that Alice

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    The Individual in "Chains of Illusion”

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    people who are not tired of life ,but enjoy living every moment that it gives. For example, my grandfather,... ... middle of paper ... ... a organization. They claim that the role of an non-conformist is to clash with society and their rules. Fromm and Emerson were fascinated by thinkers who freed themselves from organized societies . The main problem with their philosophy is that if all of human race was non-conforming to society, the world would be destroyed. Laws were created to promote order

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    Is Religion Wrong?

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    Is Religion Wrong? Sigmund Freud and Karl Marx both seemed to believe that religion is a Drug. In which it helps people feel better about the unknown. Let’s face it humans’ fear the uncertain and we don’t like to be scared. So what does our human instinct do? “Know Everything”. But what happens when it is impossible to know the “ultimate concern”? I may seem atheist to you but I’m not I just don’t like to have my beliefs spoon fed to me. I like to challenge and question everything. I believe

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    depends on one of his few social relationships. That is why he adopts an excessively paternalistic and authoritarian approach when dealing with his son, including controlling the various aspects of his son’s daily live. This essay will therefore apply Erich Fromm’s notion of Authoritarian Personality to explain the controlling attribute of the father and how this results in the corruptive fatherly love that he exhibits towards his son that ultimately deters his son’s maturation process, psychologically

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    The Evil of Capitalism

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    millions of people, due to the innovation of these great American inventors. Often the greatest criticism of capitalism comes from social visionaries, such as Erich Fromm. He proposes that mankind must cease living in the having mode, concerned only with material wealth and power, to enter the being mode, and abandon their selfishness and greed. Fromm states, "In the having mode of existence my relationship to the world is one of possessing and owning, one in which I want to make everybody and everything

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    1. Eric Fromm defined the “syndrome of decay” as the presence of a cluster of three different personality disorders (maximum 25 points). Eric Fromm discussed three very unappealing and evil forms of personality in psychologically unhealthy people that make up the "syndrome of decay", Necrophilia or the love of death, Malignant Narcissism or infatuation with self, and incestuous symbiosis or the propensity to be constrained to a mothering figure or something that is similar. In my opinion these pathological

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    clearly encapsulates the notion of the human being when they get emancipated from the bondage of submission and becomes free. In the book ‘Clinical Erich Fromm’ the author gives an example; while diagnosing a patient he was distracted and angered by the fact that the patient often came very late to the sessions. Upon consulting about this issue with Fromm, he suggested that the true diagnosis of the patient can be done only when the author would investigate the reason behind the delay and not let the

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    King Lear as a Commentary on Greed

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    King Lear as a Commentary on Greed In Chapter 4 of a book titled Escape from Freedom, the famous American psychologist Erich Fromm wrote that "Greed is a bottomless pit which exhausts the person in an endless effort to satisfy the need without ever reaching satisfaction" (Fromm 98).  Fromm realized that avarice is one of the most powerful emotions that a person can feel, but, by its very nature, is an emotion or driving force that can never be satisfied.  For, once someone obtains a certain

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    The art of loving

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    and as a social philosopher, reformer and rebel Erich Fromm is no less great a name. As a psychoanalyst, he diverged from the typical Freudian obsession with unconscious drives and insisted on the importance of economic and social factors for mental well-being. His works are noted for their emphasis on a “sane society”, one which is based on rational human needs and where individuality is not compromised in the name of economics or authority. Erich Fromm is one of the pivotal figures in the Humanist

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    Obedience: Submit or Defy

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    many instances where people have the opportunity to avoid responsibility for their actions, and it must be changed or as Fromm has predicted, our society will end by obedience to powers of which we are unsure and therefore “commit suicide”. Works Cited A Few Good Men. Dir. Rob Reiner. Perf. Tom Cruise, Jack Nicholson, and Demi Moore. Colombia Pictures, 1992. Film. Fromm, Erich. “Disobedience as a Psychological and Moral Problem.” Writing and Reading for ACP Composition. Ed. Thomas E. Leahey and

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    the Pilot Tells You”, and psychoanalyst and philosopher, Erich Fromm, author of “Disobedience as a Psychological and Moral Problem”, come into the conversation. Both of these men, while renowned psychologist, have different viewpoints on obedience, nonetheless share some common ground. Obedience is a force that happens to people

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    When analyzing the first half of the book “Escape from Freedom” written by Erich Fromm, I gained quite a diverse perspective towards how individuals have become constructed throughout history. Fromm had summarized, humans cannot live in freedom without consequence. Furthering this, I was able to connect similarities between Fromm’s thesis and how a man such as Adolf Hitler, came into power. With such bold statements regarding the psychology of human nature, I have both positive thoughts as well as

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    Erich Fromm in his psychoanalytical approach to religion is distinct from the earlier works of Sigmund Freud. Fromm defines religion as “any system of thought and action shared by a group which gives the individual a frame of orientation and an object of devotion.” Fromm argues that irreligious systems including all the different kinds of idealism and “private” religions deserve being defined as a “religion.” Based on Fromm’s theory, it is explained that there is no human being who does not have

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    Obedience and Disobedience in A Few Good Man

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    The experimenter’s goal was to make sure that the teacher followed all orders, even if that meant supposedly harming the learner. Surprisingly, more people obeyed the experimenter rather than following the instinct to help the learner. Likewise, Erich Fromm, a psychoanalyst and philosopher, claims that obedience and disobedience both can have good and bad consequences. From... ... middle of paper ... ...of two marines, to perform a code red on Santiago, the learner. Although no harm was intended

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    Frankenstein

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    is what the creature feels (Fromm 623). When humanistic conscience is analyzed in more detail, it becomes apparent that this form of conscience is based on the concept that as a human being, one equips an instinctive awareness that enables him/her to decipher between what is human, and in return, what is inhuman (Fromm 623). In addition, one who possesses a humanistic conscience is also able to distinguish between good and evil, conductive and destructive, etc. (Fromm 623). Due to the creature possessing

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