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    The Epistolary Novel

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    avoid speaking about epistolary novel. Epistolary novel or novel in letters is a kind of novel that is a series of letters to one or more characters of this novel. The letter expresses sincere experiences of heroes, reflected their internal evolution. In the scientific literature epistolary novel is traditionally considered any of the articles on epistolary literature or epistolary form, or in the works on the theory and history of the novel. In the first case epistolary novel is described as a form

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    Frankenstein and the Epistolary Novel Form

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    Q: “Examine the effect of the epistolary form of writing throughout the novel Frankenstein. Do you think the epistolary novel form of writing are an effective form of telling the story? How does the epistolary form affect plot development and character development?” Mary Shelly, the author of the novel Frankenstein, writes Frankenstein in epistolary form which is an effective way of integrating the reader into the story, introducing writer bias [character development], and furthering the theme of

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    and demands. Women have been victims in novels partially because of how they are portrayed in texts. Not only that but male writers and many authors in general are also the reason women have difficulty representing themselves as individuals. However, Samuel Richardson’s epistolary novel played a major role in changing society’s perspective on gender and class. He ventured outside of this categorization and incorporated new ideas and characters into his novel. Richardson’s love story showcased a

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    The Color Purple is an epistolary novel written by Alice Walker. This novel displays the growth and development of an average African-American woman. This novel demonstrates the everyday hardships that were placed on blacks, and how they battled to overcome them. It is a very controversial novel, and touches on a variety of sensitive topics, from spousal abuse, incest, to even lesbianism. Alice Walker vividly explains the difficult, yet realistic, life of blacks in their communities. She writes of

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    Frankenstein as a Non-Epistolary Film

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    Frankenstein as a Non-Epistolary Film A novel written in the epistolary style is by nature difficult to adapt to film. The director, perhaps already adept at navigating the ragged breakers of length-contraction and visual style, is forced to deal with the additional sandbar presented by a plot format in which no visual action occurs and, more often than not, this difficulty consequently runs the film aground. Kenneth Branagh, in bringing Mary Shelley's Frankenstein to the screen as Mary Shelley's

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    surrounded by racism, sexism, and abuse from her father and husband. Alice Walker wrote The Color Purple in epistolary style and it traces Celie’s journey of finding her identity and path of finally accepting herself. On her journey she encounters a couple of women including one named Shug Avery, who helps turn Celie’s life around. Throughout The Color Purple, Alice Walker uses the epistolary structure to demonstrate self-acceptance in women. Celie, the main character in The Color Purple has trouble

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    Race and Class in Alice Walker's Color Purple

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    sister Nettie. This discovery not only signals the introduction of a new narrator to this epistolary novel but also begins the transformation of Celie from writer to reader. Indeed, the passage in which Celie struggles to puzzle out the markings on her first envelope from Nettie provides a concrete illustration of both Celie's particular horizon of interpretation and Walker's chosen approach to the epistolary form: Saturday morning Shug put Nettie letter in my lap. Little fat queen of England

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    The Color Purple

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    The Color Purple The novel, The Color Purple, is an epistolary novel. In the letterforms, Alice Walker gives several ideas, such as, friendship, domination, courage & independence. She impacts readers by looking at the story through the eyes of Celie and Nettie. The book describes the fateful life of a young lady. It tells how a 14 year old girl fights through all the steps and finally she is in command for her own life. Celie is the young lady who has been constantly physically, sexually

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    Literary Analysis: The Color Purple

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    there are numerous themes transpiring throughout the course of the novel, the symbolism is one of the strongest prospects for instigating the plot. In The Color Purple by Alice Walker, numerous symbols influence and drive the plot of the novel. One of the most important symbols that Walker incorporates into the plot is the letters written by Celie to either God or Nettie, signifying the power of voice. The epistolary format of the novel itself enables readers to understand Celie, whose letters are initially

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    Past, Present and Future: Stoker's Impact

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    wrote many novels in his life time; he was a brilliant author and could have in fact possibly imagined how significant an impact his novels could have effected literature throughout the ages and more importantly today. Considering Stoker focused on how the past could affect the present and incorporated that ideology into many of his novels including Dracula. Dracula has come to be one of the most well-known pieces of literature in the world. Vampires are everywhere, in many fiction novels and all over

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