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Free Epistemological Essays and Papers

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    immemorial: the birth of the universe and the emergence of life. Recently, it is claimed that these events can be understood comprehensively by means of a metaphor: the 'arrow of time.' The purpose of the present paper is twofold: (1) to build an epistemological structure that underlies the principle of time's arrow; and (2) to pursue the unity of science in a novel fashion. (A) WHAT IS AN ARROW OF TIME? The events which we see in the universe are classified into two categories: the reversible and

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    Philosophy ABSTRACT: In what follows, I focus on the partiality and fallibility of each of us as individuals, and explore what that means for us as epistemic agents. When we examine the tradition of Western European thought, we note that most epistemological theories assume individuals can know the answer, and are able to critique what is passed down to others as socially constructed knowledge. Many have made the argument that while humanity can be deceived, one individual can know, and therefore

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    The Knowing Psychical Body

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    The Knowing Psychical Body ABSTRACT: By offering four epistemological structures as guidelines, I will review the relationships as described by Freud between internal and external perceptions, conversion, and over-determination. In doing so, I have speculated that a second preconscious dynamic should be recognized as functioning within this system, namely the psychical body. The activity of this preconscious psychical body promises to resolve the aporias that arise in Freud's work concerning

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    God and Person

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    and someone who can decipher the concept and meaning of right from wrong. A person has many aspects, but it is not one particular thing that makes a person a person. It’s mind, body, soul, social issues, and other qualities rolled into one. Epistemological considerations are also used in the definition of a person when considering and bringing God into the picture. Epistemology is being able to know what you know about God; therefore, a person is also made up of beliefs and ideas too. We know about

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    anthroposphere and biosphere. I hope that both these sciences will enter permanently into the world’s educational systems in the 21st century. Introduction The present article aims to present a synthesis of the characteristic features of epistemological sozology (1) and ecophilosophy (2) as sciences of the end of the twentieth century. The profile of sozology will take into account above all an analysis of the concepts involved in this science, a construction of its definition, a description

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    consciousness primarily as ‘false’ consciousness… [taking] up again, each in a different manner, the problem of Cartesian doubt, to carry it to the very heart of the Cartesian stronghold,” (Ricoeur, 33) that is, applying doubt’s caustic and destructive epistemological impulse to the internal world. Their achievement lies in the introduction of a profoundly new process of interpretation. Contrary to “any hermeneutics understood as the recollection of meaning,” (Ricoeur, 35) that is, any idea of interpretation

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    Social Research

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    AISHA GITTENS-HIPPOLYTE Taking Two Of The Theoretical Approaches To Social Research Discussed In The Module, Demonstrate The Connections Between Their Ontological, Epistemological And Methodological Assumptions. Which Method Or Methods Would Proponents Of Each Theory Favour As A Result Of Their Assumptions. In order to understand the production of sociological knowledge one must first examine the thought processes that lay behind each piece of research. Before a particular subject matter is researched

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    Philosophy for Children

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    I. The concept of the Community of Inquiry Central to the heart of P4C lies the notion of a community of inquiry. Originally a term from Pierce to reference interaction among scientists, the concept of "COI" dominates the discussion of educational revisionism as presented by commentators on the P4C movement. The key description marking a COI is: a group (a social setting) of individuals who use dialogue (interaction among participants) to search out the problematic borders of a puzzling concept

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    Atrribute of God

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    source for knowledge. God revealed both grace and truth to us by incarnating himself. Truth is unchanging and universal; it is not relative but is absolute. (Holmes 8) The Old Testament term for truth is emeth. This is primarily ethical rather epistemological term. Truth depends on unchanging reality, is personal, cannot change, and remains the same for every time and place in creation. It is absolute. To say these things is to say that God’s knowledge is complete and perfectly true. Truth is the implication

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    Spring 2005

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    research and methodology. Sandra Harding asserts in her essay, “Is There a Feminist Method?” Harding argues that it is “difficult to define a distinct feminist method because method and methodology have been intertwined with each other and with epistemological issues.”(2) Moreover, it is, she argues difficult and potentially dangerous to identify anything as a distinctive method—her argument is that “ it is not by looking at research methods that one will be able to identify distinctive features of

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