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    Critique of Praxis General Test Information The Professional Assessments for Beginning Teachers or Praxis is administered through Educational Testing Services and is currently the most popular norm-referenced test being used (Brown, 2008). The Praxis Series tests measures the knowledge of important content and skills required to teach (Educational Testing Service, 2010). Each of the tests reflects what is believed to be important for new teachers as reflected by practitioners across the United

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    Standardized Tests

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    not being challenged. My classes are easy. All I have to do is memorize the textbook and spew it out on the test. I’m not learning anything. I’m not growing.” (http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2012/11/09/one-teens-standardized-testing-horror-story-and-where-it-will-lead/) Not only do parents and students disagree with standardized tests, educators are finally standing up against it. At Seattle Garfield high school, the teachers unanimously decided to not administer the reading

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    Most students, by the time they reach college, have taken numerous MCA tests (Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments), NWEA tests (Northwest Evaluation Association), and either an ACT test (American College Testing) or SAT test (Scholastic Assessment Test), depending on which region of the United States they are from. Webster’s defines a standardized test as “any test in which the same test is given in the same manner to all test takers.” Every student who has had any type of education knows what standardized

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    standardized testing

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    acceptances. Although many argue otherwise, research shows that standardized test scores are actually a poor indicator of a student’s potential due to racial bias. To understand the validity of standardized tests, one must understand standardized testing and the types of these tests. A standardized test, as defined by the Glossary of Education, is a type of test where all test takers answer the same questions and is scored in a credible and objective manner (Glossary). Also, they are administered

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    up is their education. The educational skills children learn in school teach them the skills they need to perform outside of the classroom and in the workforce. With education being one of the most important gains in the lives of children, it has come to light how in recent years the United States has fallen further and further behind their peers in international rankings. According to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) 2009 educational scores the United States ranks

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    standardized testing in public schools was mandated in 2001 by George W. Bush's No Child Left Behind Act and is supported by the Obama administration. In recent years, it has triggered an expanding controversy against standardized tests and the use of students' scores to evaluate teachers, schools, districts, and states. Some individuals argue that standardized testing benefits students, teachers, and schools by ensuring that they are held accountable. The truth is standardized testing does not accurately

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    The SAT and Its Role in Public Policy

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    Today, in the United States, standardized tests are administered every year by states to their Kindergarten-12th grade public school students. Different states place different weight on their standardized testing results where some states differ their funding based on results and annual improvement, whereas other states allow schools to simply gauge where their students are scoring relative to other schools in the state. These tests, however, are only standardized within one state. One of the

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    Faults of Standardized Tests

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    University, was introduced in 1926 by the College Board [1]. The SAT is an attempt to predict how well a student will perform during their first year of college without measuring past academic achievement. The Educational Testing Service (ETS) was established in 1948 in order to strengthen the testing actions of the College Board [6]. While the ETS is "committed to producing tests and other products that acknowledge the multicultural nature of society and treat its diverse population with respect," they

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    The SAT Overhaul

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    Standardized testing has become an extremely common practice throughout U.S. public schools and the rest of the world. Standardized tests are used as a means of testing a student’s knowledge on a certain topic; however, there are many problems associated with the widespread usage of standardized testing. One of the most commonly used standardized tests in America is the SAT, or Scholastic Aptitude Test, which was originally designed to level the playing field for students across America and provide

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    Standardized Testing

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    tell them as a professional, the pro’s of Standardized testing and its view around the country. Since I am going to be a secondary education teacher, I would assume many of the parental worries over standardized assessments would be centered on the SAT’s, but there also could be some concern over other various tests that their child may participate in. The first thing I would tell a parent is what is in the current news about standardized testing. I would assume a parental worry that one might have

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    The Problems With College-Entrance Testing

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    Due to these reasons, admission should be based on equal representation on all aspects of the applicant rather than a number that only defines how well a student can perform in their basic knowledge. One of the biggest problems with standardized testing is that it limits diversity and creativity. When preparing for these standardized tests, teachers are expected to be responsible for a majority of student’s success. This causes teachers to teach to a test and does not allow for growth far beyond

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    The Disadvantages Of Standardized Testing

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    Standardized tests must be improved. Instead of traditional standardized testing, random testing should be put in place and tests themselves should be reconstructed to promote fairness, reduce errors and and more accurately assess student’s knowledge. Testing should be done to random groups of students on random dates throughout the year. There will be a large enough group of students to give a good idea of how well material is being taught but a small enough group that not everyone needs to take

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    The SAT Test for College Students

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    standardized test has great influence in America, whether positive or negative. Though SA... ... middle of paper ... ...T PREDICTS COLLEGE SUCCESS, STUDY SAYS."Chicago Tribune 6 May 2001: A18. LexisNexis Academic. Web. 3 Apr. 2014. Lewin, Tamar. "Testing, Testing." The New York Times. The New York Times, 03 Aug. 2013. Web. 04 Apr. 2014. Owen, David, and Marilyn Doerr. "Brains." None of the Above: The Truth Behind the SATs, Revised and Updated. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 1999. 210+. Print Prois

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    Standardized Tests Are Insufficient *No Works Cited "Anyone involved in education should be concerned about how overemphasis on the SAT is distorting educational priorities and practices, how the test is perceived by many as unfair, and how it can have a devastating impact on the self-esteem and aspirations of young students," said University of California President Richard C. Atkinson in a speech he gives to the American Council on Education in Washington, D.C. I really didn't enjoy taking the

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    Standardized Testing in Schools: The Analysis

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    Standardized Testing in Schools: The Analysis Abstract Within this paper we hope to answer lingering questions about the effectiveness of standardized testing in schools. Throughout our research we found many instances and sources of information to help us reach our goal. Standardized Testing had grown to play an enormous role in controversy concerning the Education system within the past decade. Hopefully throughout our paper it can be understood as to why this occurred and what can be

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    SAT the Wrong Choice

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    Center for Fair and Open Testing). To many this style of language is unfamiliar. Specifically students who have learned English as a second language are put at a disadvantage. Language is not the only aspect of the test that is biased. A biased format also causes disadvantage to female test takers. Research shows that the multiple choice format favors males over females. Males are more likely to take a risk and guess on a question. (The National Center for Fair and Open Testing). The ACT poorly measures

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    John Bishop of Cornell University found that nations that require standardized tests perform better on international tests compared to nations that don 't (Walberg). But the National Assessment of Educational Progress disagrees. In 2011, only thirty-five percent of U.S. 8th graders were identified as proficient in math. This places the U.S. in thirty-second place in the world (Peterson). But every state in the U.S. requires tests, so why are students

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    horrible. Tom has taken the test three times and still receive the same scores. Is it fair for college to judge tom on the scores he has receive even though he has test anxiety . what about his GPA, the course he took , community service , and his extra-curricular activities. College should not base admission

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    160462 Since the beginnings of elementary school, children across the nation are met with multiple standardized tests each year. These tests are designed to measure any given student’s intelligence, and to reflect the strength of a school’s administrators, teachers, and curriculum. However, tests like the Iowa Assessments, MAPS, and even the ACT and SAT do not serve as an accurate reading for a student’s academic abilities. Not only is each person blessed with different intelligences, but a vast

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    Standardized testing strives to create a universal standard to compare all university applicants. They are a way to level the playing field and eliminate the grading differences among high schools across the nation. In the United States, SAT and ACT standardized test scores can determine one’s future. Prestigious schools require surrealistic scores and “test-flexible” colleges that do not require test scores do not provide the same world-renowned status. This research paper will argue why the standardized

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