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    decided he didn’t want a powerful advisor and then started to change history. Louis had the longest reign in European history of 73 years. King Louis XIV distrusted the Protestants and everything they stood for. Because of that, he revoked the Edict of Nantes and torn down the walls that surrounded Protestant towns. The walls were erected to help the Protestants feel safer. He spent a lot of tax money building Versailles. That angered most people, because Versailles was only for Louis and his rich

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    Louis XIV

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    Louis XIV In the seventeenth century there were different types of leaders in Europe. The classic monarchial rule was giving way to absolutist rule. Absolute kings claimed to be ruling directly from God, therefore having divine rule that could not be interfered with. In 1643 Louis XIV began his reign over France as an absolute king. When Louis the XIV began his rule in 1643, his actions immediately began to suggest and absolute dictatorship. Because of the misery he had previously suffered, one

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    this was happening, henry and Sully created a reform called “the Edict of Nantes” which would give more freedom to protestants as they were not accepted as much as Catholics at the time. This reform would have a great impact on his people as it said that it would have toleration to an extent; meaning that this reform will be looked at again in the future. Henry would do t... ... middle of paper ... ...also revoked the Edict of Nantes, which broke the connection between Protestants and Catholics

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    came up with new set of rules and regulations for their people. Most of them were on the new developing branch of Christianity called, Protestantism. The most famous set of treaties were: Edict of Nantes in 1598; Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685; Voltaire’s Treatise on Toleration in 1763; Louis XVI’s Edict on Toleration in 1787; and the declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen in 1789. Few treaties were kept the same as the older ones; others were against the ones made earlier. Few treaties

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    French Revolution

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    One of the biggest ideas that lead to the Revolution would be religious tolerance. It all started in 1685 when King Louis XIV repealed the Edict of Nantes which had granted limited tolerance to French Protestants or Huguenots. The Edict of Nantes ended the religious wars between Catholics and Protestants that took place from 1562 to 1598. The Edict of Nantes also included new liberties for the Huguenots. The Huguenots were allowed to build churches and hold religious services in specified villages

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    Absolute Monarchy Essay

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    of the French people. In France, Louis XIII is an important example of the absolute monarchy, which controlled all facts of military and economic power through a single ruler. Udder Louis XIII’s reign, the consolidation of power away from the Edicts of Nantes to dominant local politics and sovereignty in Europe. These forms of absolute power define the role of the monarch in controlling the people without the influence of the nobility or a parliament in the decision making process. In essence, the

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    Louis XIV, the ruler of France from the late seventeenth century to the early eighteenth century, claimed, “I am the state.” He considered this to be absolutism. His goal, also acquainted with absolutism, was, “one king, one law, one faith;” Furthermore, Louis wanted to promote religious unity, royal dignity, and security of the state. In order to achieve this goal, he had to rule with a firm hand, laying down the law for all to see. Louis XIV’s absolutism fostered in four major parts: the building

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    to forcibly convert them back to believing and placing loyalty back in the Catholic Church. Louis XIV continued this aggressive persecution of the Huguenots when he did away with the Edict of Nantes. He signed a document formally named the Edict of Fountainebleau which, as mentioned, revoked the previous Edict of Nantes that supported the Protestants and even went so far to even make

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    Different Impacts on Religion

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    Close to one hundred and fifty years apart, both Louis XIV Edict of Fontainebleau and Luther’s Address to the Christian Nobility of the German Nation had an immense impact on religion. Martin Luther’s document would pave the way for the Protestant Reformation, while Louis XIV would revoke all the freedoms that the Huguenots enjoyed in a Catholic France with the Edict of Nantes. This essay will compare and contrast these distinctions and their impact on religion. Therefore, although years apart, these

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    other religious groups that could have influence in the central government, such as the Huguenots. He did this by signing in the Edict of Fontainebleau, which revoked the Edict of Nantes. The Edict of Nantes, made in 1598, made Catholicism the official religion of France; however it allowed Huguenots the right to worship and to hold office. By revoking the Edict of Nantes, Louis made it so that Protestants could not worship in Catholic France. This helped make “one faith” more attainable and would

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