Free Ecological Change Essays and Papers

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Free Ecological Change Essays and Papers

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    anylonger that the ecological crisis puts mankind as a whole to an existential test which have to be solved in practice and in theory. So, by this the vast amount of literature can be explained which consequently led to the emergence of an own "genre" — the so called "ecoliterature" which herself is really dissonant and ambigious. In the meantime — besides other sources — almost all sciences take part in such kind of discussions what obviously can be traced back to the fact that the ecological crisis is such

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    The Maasai Culture And Ecological Adaptations

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    Introduction The Rift Valley in East Africa has been the home of pastoralists for over three thousand years. A number of different tribes migrated to Kenya, grouped by language they include the Cushites derived from Southern Ethiopia, the Nilotes, which include the Maasai, from Southern Sudan, and the Bantu. The Maa speaking people are the group from which the Maasai originated; their expansion southward into the Great Rift Valley began about 400 years ago. The second stage of Maasai expansion involved

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    To Dam, or Not To Dam

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    dams is very well seen. Reisner talks of the ecological damages that dams create. The debate over dams has been heated in recent years, their harmful effects and overall abundance is the topic for such debates. But are dams as bad as everyone says they are, do dams do more harm than good, or more good than harm? Emphasis should be placed on comparing the ecological effects verses the economical benefits. There are many pros and cons for the ecological side of this debate. One pro is that dams

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    Eco-feminism

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    women’s oppression, ecological degradation, and the exploitation of workers, race, and class. In the midst of these troubles, a movement known as ecofeminism appears to be gaining recognition. In the following, I hope to illustrate this revitalization movement . I will begin by characterizing a definition of ecofeminism; I will then bring to the forefront the ethical issues that Ecofeminism is involved with, then distinguish primary ideas and criticisms. Though in theory, ecological feminism has been

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    Ecological Hermeneutics

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    articulation of an ecological hermeneutics? As "hermeneutics" is the art of interpretation and understanding, "ecological hermeneutics" is understood as the act of interpreting the impact of technology within the lifeworld. I consider the potential for ecological hermeneutics based upon Gadamer’s theory of science. First, I outline his theory of science. Second, I delineate ecological hermeneutics as an application of this theory. Third, I discuss what can be expected from the act of ecological hermeneutics

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    Powell, K., 2005. Fish farming, Eat your Veg, Nature, 426, 378-379. The article that I chose to review discussed the possibility of maintaining and sustaining aquaculture by changing the diets of the farmed fish. The idea of carnivorous fish turning into vegetarians would help for future sustentation of aquaculture. There were pros and cons to either side of vegetarianism and the maintaining of carnivores. There are issues that would require research and analysis

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    they previously had been unknown (Crosby, 66). Also, many Europeans made large profits from cultivating native plants such as tobacco, cocoa, paprika, American cotton, and sassafras (Crosby, 66). Despite these successes with native plants, true ecological effects of European expansion on the New World during the age of discovery is not revealed unless focus is placed on the large numbers of non native plants that were introduced by European explorers and settlers. The subsequent introduction of European

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    The Ecological Impact of Native Americans in Eastern North America Shetler, in the book Seeds of Change: Five Hundred Years Since Columbus, supports the myth that the new world was an unspoiled paradise by stating that " Native people were transparent in the landscape, living as natural elements of the ecosphere. Their world…was a world of barely perceptible human disturbances"(Shetler 1991). Sale contends that the Indians had a benign effect and refering to them as the "Ecological Indian".(Sale

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    Will the Long Cable be Sound? The Ecological Impact of the Cross-Sound Cable There has been an unfortunate trend in the way that people of the Western culture treat the environment. Often times there appear to be two sides to this battle being fought by extremist perspectives. On one side stand the environmentalists who in some cases seek to block any move that may harm the environment, and on the other side stand the corporate people who seek to justify both a profitable and a logistical

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    history was initiated by historians like William Cronon, who explores the changes in the New England environment under the stewardship of Native Americans and European colonist in Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England. Cronon’s work expounds on the ecological impacts of the colonization of New England, and he accomplishes this by frequently comparing and contrasting the radically differing ecological policies of Native Americans and the European colonists who co-habited

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