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Free Dresden Essays and Papers

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    to find order in the chaos that was the bombing of Dresden. Vonnegut has given me a new outlook on my life heading into the future and has helped me to find order in the chaos that is life’s misfortunes. Vonnegut starts off the book by saying “I thought it would be easy for me to write about the destruction of Dresden.” This is important because Vonnegut is acknowledging that he can’t just write about what happened to him during Dresden because “There is nothing intelligent to say about a

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    relevant historical background written by Kurt Vonnegut, who experienced first hand the events in Dresden during World War II. Vonnegut was a prisoner in Dresden, Germany, and at the time Dresden was a relatively defenseless and militarily bleak city. "The city was fire bombed so successfully (and senselessly) that 135,000 civilians were killed in the violent fire storm" (McKean). The suffering in Dresden was so horrible that writers, artists and historians have had a hard time conveying how horrible

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    In the first chapter of Slaughterhouse-Five, the narrator goes to meet an old war friend, Bernard V. O’Hare, who served with him in World War II and was also witness to the bombing of Dresden. The narrator, having attempted to write a novel based on his experiences during that time for many years, was hoping that, between the two of them, they could come up with some good war stories to incorporate into his novel. After many failed attempts to find something of substance upon which to base his novel

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    and horrifying details of Grandfather’s experiences during the bombing raids in Dresden. Matthew Mullins (a doctoral student and instructor of English at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro) notes that “Nowhere in the text does Oskar or any of the characters describe the horror of 9/11 in [such] graphic terms [as] used in both the account of the Japanese woman after Hiroshima and in Thomas Schell’s post-Dresden account” (Mullins 315-16). Among other traumatic experiences of that event, Grandfather

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    Kurt Vonnegut's trials and tribulations surrounding the infamous firebombing of Dresden. This American classic is also seen as an example of Post-Modern fiction. Post-Modernism revolves around resistance and is seen as a reaction against Enlightenment style thinking and otherwise Modernist approaches to literature. What better way to resist than give gritty detail of a government cover up such as the massacre of Dresden? Vonnegut's black humor along side his satiric voice, his use of fragmentation

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    entire first chapter is Vonnegut explaining his inability to write a serious book of his own first hand account of the Dresden Firebombing. Billy Pilgram is an apprentice optometrist when he is called to duty in World War II. He was, is, and has been a slightly above average individual his entire life, which just happened to be unstuck in time and to witness the firebombing of Dresden. I think his character purpose in being so strikingly

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    quotation from the novel within the novel. In the first chapter of Slaughterhouse-Five we learn that Vonnegut dedicated this book to O’Hare’s wife Mary and to a former, German soldier whom Vonnegut met in the mid 1960’s driving taxi on a return trip to Dresden shortly after that visit to his friend O’Hare. A taxi driver named Gerhard Müller shows them the rebuilt city, and they learn his side of story, from being

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    A very important part of his life was when he served in WWII where he was taken as a prisoner of war. Vonnegut was captured by the Germans on December 14, 1944 in the Battle of the Bulge (Biography). He was kept in Dresden with other POWs to work in a syrup factory. When Dresden was bombed on February 13, 1945, he survived while hiding in a cellar of a slaughterhouse where the POWs were living. Vonnegut was finally able to come home in May of 1945. He discusses his struggle to write about his

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    Earnest Hemmingway once said "Never think that war, no matter how necessary, nor how justified, is not a crime." (Ernest Hemingway: A Literary Reference) War is a gruesome and tragic thing and affects people differently. Both Vonnegut and Hemmingway discus this idea in their novels A Farewell to Arms and Slaughterhouse Five. Both of the novels deal not only with war stories but other genres, be it a science fiction story in Vonnegut’s case or a love story in Hemingway’s. Despite all the similarities

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    roughly 16 square miles of the cities were destroyed. Historians also estimate that this attack left a million injured and another million homeless. In the end roughly 50% of Tokyo was destroyed and the deaths outnumber those caused in the raid on Dresden, Hiroshima and Nagasaki as a single events. Even more surprising Tokyo wasn’t the only Japanese city that had been firebombed by the Americans it was just one of numerous cities in Japan that the Americans attacked. By not just including the bombing

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