Free Dracula Essays and Papers

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    One of the best things about Dracula is the way the author, Bram Stoker, can set up any kind of atmosphere in order to make the readers feel anyway he wants them to. There are countless parts in this book where Stoker makes the readers feel horrified, creeped out, and even have mixed emotions about certain characters. The first place where Stoker sets up a chilling atmosphere is when Harker first gets to Dracula’s castle. Harker gets dropped off at the castle in the dark and is outside all alone

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    The Film Dracula by Bran Stoker

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    Bram Stoker’s Dracula had no copyright license over reprints of Stoker’s original work. However, because Stoker’s widow had obtained copyright license over theatrical productions, at the time, that also included films. Therefore, while Nosferatu is a horror film based primarily off of Bram Stoker’s Dracula, directed by F.W. Murnau, it follows an almost identical plot with the exception of the characters’ names. Although eventually, Mrs. Stoker did win an infringement lawsuit against the makers of

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    For example, Dracula was clearly a form of Satan, a being that was cursed and demonized. Although there is a disconnect with religious symbolism and Eli, it can still be argued that she is viewed as a deity by the main characters. Her godlike superpowers and strength

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    bram stokers "dracula"

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    people are familiar with the novel Dracula, by Bram Stoker. It is typically referred to as a horror story sure to give a good scare. However, Bram Stoker was not merely out to give his Victorian audience a thrill ride. Many symbols and themes, particularly those of the main antagonist Dracula, were brought into the novel to teach a lesson. Oddly enough, Dracula resembles other forces of evil in other religions as well. A strong comparison exists between Dracula, Satan, and Hindu demons. Of course

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    The Central Plot of Dracula

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    ostensively extraneous to the central plot of Dracula, he fulfils an important role in Stoker’s exploration of the central themes of the novel. This paper will examine how Renfield character is intertwined with the three central themes of invasion, blood and otherness. Firstly, through Renfield’s inner struggle we learn that he is ‘not his own master’ (Stoker, 211). The theme of invasion is revealed by the controlling and occupying powers of Count Dracula. Secondly, the reoccurring theme ‘the Blood

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    Film Analysis of Dracula by Bram Stoker Bram Stoker’s Dracula was filmed and produce in 1992 by Francis Ford Coppola. Based on the infamous vampire novel Dracula in the 1890s. The film stars Gary Oldman as Dracula throughout the film, the hero Harker is played by Keanu Reeves. Winona Ryder play two parts of the film, one is the wife of Dracula the opening sequence and later plays the fiancée of Harker reincarnated. And Anthony Hopkins play the priest of the Christian church of the opening

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    Bram Stoker's Dracula is Anti-Christian There are many ways that Bram Stoker's Dracula can be considered Anti- Christian by showing of Anti-Christian values and perversions of the Christian religion. In chapter one as Jonathan Harker is traveling to Castle Dracula he is met by several people. When he meets these people and tells them where he is going they cross themselves along with doing several other superstiscious actions. One of the women he meets gives him a crucifix to protect him

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    One of the many taboos explored in the novel Dracula is sexuality. During this Victorian era Stoker manages to discretely display the idea of not only consuming one another, but also the transformation from innocence that a victim undergoes. Women during this era had two options: first to be a virgin, representing all things pure and innocent, and second a wife or mother. If a woman did not fit into either of these categories she was considered a whore and therefore not considered a part of society

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    Bram Stoker's Dracula Meets Hollywood

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    Bram Stoker's Dracula Meets Hollywood For more than 100 years, Bram Stoker’s Victorian novel, Dracula, has remained one of the most successful and revered novels ever published. Since its release in 1897, no other literary publication has been the subject of cinematic reproduction as much as Dracula. Dracula has involuntarily become the most media friendly personality of the 20th century. When a novel, such as Dracula, is transformed into a cinematic version, the end product is usually mediocre

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    VIRTUOUS AND UNVEILED Mandy Gold sits down with famous director Francis Ford Coppola to discuss the controversy surrounding his sexualisation of women in his famous film, ‘Bram Stoker’s Dracula.’ Since its release in 1992 Coppola has been accused of ruining the original story line of Bram Stoker’s Dracula by hyper-sexualising the women and thus changing the focus completely. Coppola however, maintains his position that he has not destroyed the original, rather, he has enhanced the many

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    book, Dracula has been published, it has excited so many of its readers. Due to the combination of its symbolism, themes and characters. In order for anyone to comprehend what is beyond the story, readers must have a knowledge or the plot of the book itself as well as Bram Stoker's own life. When they have fully understood him and the story, it becomes fairly easy for the audience to break down the characters, as well as the themes and symbolism that lie within. Although many people see Dracula as a

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    writing, Dracula was finally published. Written by Bram Stoker during the Victorian Era. There was much sentiment towards the emancipation of woman. Though these feelings came mostly from women, there were also opposing sentiments, mostly from men, who did not feel the same way towards the liberation of women. The feminist movement was beginning to take ahold of society and many would have to become accustomed to the new ideals of women possibly being in power. There is much criticism of Dracula. There

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    Analysis of Film Dracula, Prince of Darkness Horror has been a popular genre over the last 200 years. People enjoy reading gothic novels and watching horror films because it injects excitement into their lives. This may be because generally life is safer and people may find it mundane; horror gives people a thrill and knowing you're in safe surroundings lets you know you're going to be ok after the short time you are being entertained. Writers like Sheridan Le Fanu, Bram Stoker and Edgar

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    In 1897 Irish creator distributed Dracula, setting up the advanced vampire novel. Before composing Dracula, Stoker met Armin Vambery who was a Hungarian essayist and voyager. Dracula likely rose up out of Vámbéry's dim stories of the Carpathian mountains (Time web). Stoker at that point put in quite a while looking into European old stories and fanciful stories of vampires. Dracula is an epistolary novel, composed as an accumulation of reasonable, yet totally anecdotal, journal sections, wires, letters

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    Dracula, the 1931 film directed by Tod Browning is loosely based upon the novel of the same name. Therefore both share similar characteristics but are distinct. The differences between the novel and film occur due to the cinematic choices made as well as the fact that the film is based off of not only the novel Dracula but also the 1924 play Dracula. One major decision made by Browning was to alter the role of Johnathan Harker. In the novel Johnathan is the solicitor who meets with Dracula in Transylvania

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    brothers, his writing in Dracula exhibited a great deal of homosociality, the idea of same-sex relationships on a social level, rather than romantically. In the novel, Stoker introduces the idea of homosociality by creating a friendship and camaraderie between the main male characters. Dracula begins with a diary entry from Jonathan Harker, a real estate agent from England. Mr. Harker is traveling to Transylvania, where he is to confirm a business deal between Count Dracula and his mentor Peter Hawkins

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    Dracula is a story about vampires whiten by Bram Stoker it was publish in 1897 by Constable and Co, The novels become very popular it was one of the best sell novels at the time. The novel takes place in Dracula’s castle located in the city of Transylvania. The story talks about different characters this characters get the reader’s attention with their interesting stories. The book shows how people have a fear for Dracula even when some people have never seen him before. The story will show the

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    Repressed Sexuality in Bram Stoker's Dracula Perhaps no work of literature has ever been composed without being a product of its era, mainly because the human being responsible for writing it develops their worldview within a particular era.  Thus, with Bram Stoker's Dracula, though we have a vampire myth novel filled with terror, horror, and evil, the story is a thinly veiled disguise of the repressed sexual mores of the Victorian era.  If we look to critical interpretation and commentary to

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    wrote Dracula, these concepts varied drastically. The deeds of men and women were distinctly different, the influence of God was more important, and the social class of friends and family had more weight attached. In Dracula, Stoker’s ability to defy any normality placed within culture allowed the deeper analysis of the changes happening in the society. Many people were strict on their belief of God and their job within society, however, in the confinement of their head these beliefs

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    Paternalism in Bram Stoker's Dracula

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    Paternalism in Bram Stoker's Dracula Paternalism is the domination of a society by a male or parental figure that leads or governs much like the way a father would direct his family.  In Victorian society, the idea of paternalism was prevalent.  The idea was also frequently used as a motif in western literature.  Bram Stoker's novel Dracula, published in 1897, depicts a paternalistic society through a repression of the female sex and a continuous exaltation of the domineering male sex

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