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    The gods and goddesses that the Greek people believe in make up the Greek mythology studied today.  These divine characters represent a family living on Mount Olympus who intervene frequently in the lives of the human characters in Greek plays.  They are omnipresent, for they are always observing mans actions and working through human nature.  The gods are a higher power, and provide explanations for otherwise unexplainable events.  The gods help humans in trouble and give

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    Old Testament vs. Hellenic Divine Intervention The Old Testament and Hellenic texts we have studied have numerous examples of divine intervention. The range and complexity in human affairs that these interventions occur have similar, yet different attributes. Both texts describe divine intervention as a way of explaining "why things happen(ed) and being "chosen" by God or gods to fulfill a destiny. Both also see divine intervention as something that can not be understood by humans; God or the gods

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    The Protagonist as Victim in Oedipus the King and Hamlet In Sophocle's Oedipus the King and William Shakespeare's Hamlet, the unruly forces surrounding the protagonists are the source for their downfall. Fate, women, and divine intervention are the foundation for the protagonists' demise. The protagonists are powerless against these elements, and for that reason, are not responsible for their finish. The uncontrollable force of fate is one component that assists in destroying Oedipus

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    a tragedy resulting from different things. In Oedipus Rex the tragedy is a result of Oedipus's fate. In Hamlet the tragedy is caused by human folly. The divine intervention of God is what causes the tragedy in Job. The tragedy in Oedipus Rex is a result of fate, in Hamlet a result of human folly, and in Job a result of divine intervention. The play Oedipus Rex involves the tragic downfall of the main character King Oedipus. This tragedy was a result of fate. From the time Oedipus was born

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    quickly become stagnant and fizzle out into inaction. The central divine driving force in both of the works is the wrath of two female gods: Juno(Hera:Greek) and Minerva(Athena:Greek). These two are responsible for much of the driving force in the two stories as they settle their vendetta with the Paris and the Trojans. As a result, and for purposes of scope, this essay will examine specifically the effects of the godly intervention on the Trojans and Troy. In The Iliad the actions of the gods

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    originated these questions.  Thousands of years before the time of the Greeks man worried that his life, and therefore his fate, was determined by very powerful gods.  Hence much time and energy was spent praying and asking the gods to utilize divine intervention to provide better hunting, weather, food, and other forms of good fortune. Thousands of years of superstition and spiritual worship evolved into Greeks’ religion, which was based on mythology and the belief that gods of the Olympus controlled

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    is clear because you are no longer concerned with your human emotions. This also assumes that personal enlightenment is the issue, and no divine enlightenment intervenes. Chaucer's Palinode to Troilus and Criseyde does depict Troilus as being instilled with divine enlightenment, however, and one wonders if Troilus's epiphany manifests due to divine intervention, or merely because he is now emotionally separated from his situation. In Beowulf, the protagonist represents the perfect hero. Beowulf

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    Exploring the Validity of Natural Theology

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    Exploring the Validity of Natural Theology The thought processes that underlie Creationism and Evolution are undoubtedly very different. The fundamentalists of the former school of thought adhere to the Biblical tenet that divine creation in six days is responsible for environmental diversity, whereas evolutionists have repeatedly stated that the universe was created billions of years ago and is in a constant state of fluctuation. At first glance, these accounts of life on Earth seem incompatible—the

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    islands, and civilizations throughout the duration of the "Odyssey".  Thus, creating many smaller, different settings that all fit into vast setting. The gods and goddesses constantly intervene in the "Odyssey".  There are many examples of divine intervention in the "Odyssey".  One of the most influential gods in the "Odyssey" is Poseidon.  Poseidon causes Odysseus's journey to be so difficult.  Poseidon is mad at Odysseus because of what he did to his son Polyphemus.  Polyphemus asked his father

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    whether we as a species have free will or if some divine source, some call it fate, controls our destiny. The same debate applies to Oedipus the King and Oedipus at Colonus. Does Oedipus control his actions, or are they predetermined by the gods? It’s that question that makes Oedipus a classic, and many different people think many different things. With all the oracles and talk of prophecies, its obvious that there is some divine intervention in Oedipus. But how strong is it, and how much control

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