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    There are millions of concepts that people can come up when talking about the Divine Comedy. There are even interpretations of things most people would just pass up including me. However, I have decided to talk about how each book throughout was personified by three main ideas. The three main items start with the three mystical beasts of hell, the three stones steps of purgatory, and ends with the three topic questions of paradise. The book of hell (Inferno) was a great concept of with hell would

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    terza rima that details a descent through Nine Circles of Hell, The Inferno encompasses temporal, literary, and political bridges and chasms that link Dante's inspired Centaur work between the autobiographical and the fictive, the mundane and the divine and, from a contemporary viewpoint, the Medieval and the Modern‹Dante's recognition of the Renaissance as our millennium's metamorphic period and of himself as its poetic forerunner (until deposition by Shakespeare). The Inferno is a work

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    Dante's The Divine Comedy - Heaven and Hell Where does a person who commits a heinous sin go? Where does a person who did legitimate things and prays all his life go? This is what distinguishes hell and heaven. Hell is to people, what school is to students, a place where souls of all morals, good or bad, were consigned after death. This is the place of punishment of Satan and the other fallen angels and of all mortals who die unrepentant of serious sin. On the contrary, heaven is to people, what

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    St.Augustine in the Inferno It is hard to place St. Augustine within just one of the levels of Dante’s hell for his sins were varied and not great. Today many of his sins are commonplace. For example, most people attempt to better their own lives without regard of others. They attempt to increase their standard of living and gain more worldly possessions. They are neither good nor evil but are just trying to make a living and keep up in today’s fend-for-yourself society. Before Augustine’s conversion

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    A Comparison of Odyssey, Divine Comedy, and Paradise Lost Epics by definition are long narrative poems, that are grand in both theme and style (Webster 417).  They usually involve actions of great glory and are typically centered around historical or legendary events of universal significance.  Most epics deal with the deeds of a single individual, however, it is not uncommon to have more than one main character.  Epics embody several main features including: supernatural

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    Analysis of the Inferno of Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri is considered by many as the first great poem in the Italian language and perhaps the greatest poem written in Medieval Europe. The poem is so famous that one of the minor characters, Capaneus the great blasphemer, has his name on a mesa on one of Jupiter's moon Io (Blue, 1). Also, the poem is divided into three canticles, or sections, "Inferno," "Purgatorio,' and "Paradisio." For

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    Divine Comedy: Dante Puts the Hell in Hellenism Ever since they were created Greek heroes and their stories have found a perpetual home in the minds and imagination of everyday people.  There they grow to new height through art and literature.  Dante Alighieri includes famous Greek characters throughout the first book of his Divine Comedy: Hell.  From the famed philosophers and personages who fill Limbo to the very last circles of Hell where the giants inhabit, Dante uses as images of different

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    Sinner vs. the Sin in Dante's Divine Comedy

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    Sinner vs. the Sin in the Divine Comedy Often when we set out to journey in ourselves, we come to places that surprise us with their strangeness. Expecting to see what is straightforward and acceptable, we suddenly run across the exceptions. Just as we as self‹examiners might encounter our inner demons, so does Dante the writer as he sets out to walk through his Inferno. Dante explains his universe - in terms physical, political, and spiritual - in the Divine Comedy. He also gives his readers

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    Is there a possibility that violence and fraud both have a lot in common? Is Dante’s reverence of the classical scholars more vivid in this canto despite his brevity? Does Virgil’s explanation of why usury was a sin convincing? Why did Dante raise the question on usury at this point since there seems to be no relevant connection to the other two main vices? These are the kinds of questions that make this canto very interesting. Canto XI offers us something different from all the action of the past

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    Dante's Divine Comedy - Wolf Imagery in The Inferno For years, I hunger like a wolf for a study of Dante, wracked with my own kind of greediness for knowledge of Dante's vision of the journey down. This hunger is fed by my initiation and priestesshood into a mystery tradition based on teachings that date back to 14th century Italy[i]. Through the years of my involvement with this tradition, I attempt to view the world through the lens of a 14th century Italian woman, trying to understand the

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