Dime Novels Essays

  • Anthony Comstock – The Father of American Censorship

    579 Words  | 2 Pages

    Anthony Comstock – The Father of American Censorship Anthony Comstock was the most prominent American advocate of censorship in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.  Born in Connecticut in 1844, Comstock fought with the Union in the Civil War and upon release became an influential member of the Young Men’s Christian Association.  His personal quest to rid America of indecent and immoral literature made his name synonymous with the epithet “Comstockery” or the excessive pursuit

  • Industrial Western Movie: There Will Be Blood

    1362 Words  | 3 Pages

    There Will be Blood (2007) is an entertaining movie that delineates in various forms that will be discussed from other western genres. It is a story that is formed from a novel by Upton Sinclair’s book, Oil! (1927) (Belton, 2009, p.401). Many westerns were based on dime novels that were written in the mid and late 1800s (Belton, 2009, p.246). American society was going through a transitional period from an agrarian society to an industrial society in the 1800s and early 1900s (Wright 2001; Desk

  • Criticism of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Past and Present

    623 Words  | 2 Pages

    American novels.  Marks Twain’s masterpiece, narrated by a rebellious boy who rafts down the Mississippi river with a runaway slave, has received a wide variety of kudos and criticism since it first appeared in 1885.  While it is still applauded for its childlike imagination and realistic use of dialogue, the criticisms of Huck Finn have undergone a drastic shift. Upon its initial release, Huck Finn was blasted by some critics for indecency.  They argued that Twain’s story, like dime novels, would

  • The Public Reception of Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    960 Words  | 2 Pages

    irreverent. Others called it Twain's best work yet, hailing his humor and style throughout the novel. Though obscure at first, reviews began to appear in many newspapers throughout the country as more and more became interested in the novel as a result of these reviews. Huckleberry Finn was published at a time when the nation was deeply concerned about the effects of literature on young minds. Dime novels appeared in abundance, and had moved from western stories to more modern stories, like those

  • My Town

    872 Words  | 2 Pages

    Sometimes, its determined entrepreneurs, the set of five-year-old twins, Brooke and Blake Simone like to mix their drink of choice with "extra flavoring," such as leaves, rocks, and the occasionally, yet classic family of ants. Needless to say, the single dime in their yellow Teletubbie cash box has not multiplied since their first day of business. The strip mall to the north has been replaced by Car Max, the automobile superstore. Unfortunately, the abundance of cars has not, in fact, improved anyone's

  • The Origins Of The Literary Western: Dime Novels And The Virginian By O.Wister

    1583 Words  | 4 Pages

    of the concept is based on the history of "the western US during the later part of the 19th century, when communities were settled but there was not much law and order” [4]. The western got its start in the "penny dreadfuls” and later in the "dime novels”. "Penny Dreadful” [2] was a term applied to nineteenth century English fiction publications, usually lurid serial stories appearing in parts over a number of weeks, each part costing a penny. The term, however, soon came to encompass a

  • of mice and men

    753 Words  | 2 Pages

    out of trouble, free from the constraints of society. Both men constantly keep this dream in front of them. In fact, Lennie asks George to repeat the dream over and over. George, himself, refuses to frivolously spend any money, for he is saving every dime to buy the land. The dream keeps both of the working; it also keeps them close. Curley's wife and Crooks, two cynics, scoff at the dream of Lennie and George as being unrealistic, but Candy sees its possibility and its beauty. He offers to give his

  • Summary of Now and On Earth by Jim Thompson

    1869 Words  | 4 Pages

    but were always strapped for cash. A good example as to how money was such an important thing is mentioned in the book, a worker went into a dinner and asked for a beer and a cheese sandwich, he handed the waitress a dollar and she gave him but a dime in return, he asked if there is some mistake and she said "Oh no. Sandwich, fifty. Beer, forty. No mistake." "Funny, What's those?" in a rather sarcastic tone. "Why their my breasts, you fool! What'd you think they were?" He responded "Didn't know

  • The Life Of Ruth St. Denis

    1192 Words  | 3 Pages

    to study dance. Her training included social dance forms and skirt dancing, lessons from Maria Bonfante, and Delsarte technique. St. Denis's professional career began in 1892. In New York City, she worked as a skirt dancer in dime museums and vaudeville houses. "Dime museums featured "leg dancers" (female dancers whose legs were visible under their short skirts) in brief dance routines."# In that type of atmosphere, St. Denis was worked to the bone and forced to perform her routine at least

  • Shakespeares Childhood

    959 Words  | 2 Pages

    Renaissance There have been many classic rag-to-riches stories, and while they may seem almost cliché, there are so few that are overlooked. For example, many musicians in the rock era who we know today grew up in lesser homes, and they struggled to earn a dime. Elton John, as well known and wealthy as he is today, spent the greater part of 10 years fighting diligently to fill small clubs to make a living off of his wonderful musical talent. While it may be hard for many people to believe, not all quintessential

  • How to burn a cd

    1703 Words  | 4 Pages

    something to get into an account.. sorry. In 2000, one of the biggest news stories was the rise of Napster and similar file-sharing programs. With these programs, you could get an MP3 version of just about any song you want without shelling out a dime. The record companies were fairly upset over this turn of events, and understandably so: They weren't making any money off the distribution of their product to millions of people. An external writable CD drive, also called a CD burner: With this

  • Narrative Essay: I am Japanese American

    684 Words  | 2 Pages

    feel JA men are some of America's best kept secrets. There is a story of a vertically challenged man who was in the midst of some tall men. One of the taller men said to him, "You must feel pretty small right now." The man replied, "Yes, I feel like a dime in the midst of a bunch of nickels." Being a JA male is not easy in America. We get no respect, it seems. Often, the image of the JA male is the nerd, the quiet invisible man, or somehow one devoid of sexuality. JA women have been elevated by

  • Life in Colors

    765 Words  | 2 Pages

    pick out clothes, the color blue was in every item that I bought. And to this day the color blue has been my color of choice as long as I can remember. It will always be that color blue that will be in my fancy wardrobe as long as I live. Silver as a dime, nickel, or quarter is the color that makes up the high school years since starting in the ninth grade. Silver is the color of the star on the uniform for the brigade which I serve proudly. The color silver did not become appealing to me until that

  • Critical Analysis of "Jimmy Choo Shoes" ad

    832 Words  | 2 Pages

    that a woman maybe one hundred pounds heavier in a simple evening dress cannot wear those shoes and still be as sexy? What makes this vulnerable woman so appealing and desirable in this advertisement? What really is this ad trying to sell? Shoes are a dime a dozen. I went to the mall the other day and went into 8 different shoe stores alone. Obviously there is something special about Jimmy Choo shoes. Is this company really tying to sell you the shoes, or trying to sell you the name? I recall watching

  • Glengarry Glen Ross

    601 Words  | 2 Pages

    Glen Ross, selling is like a complicated courtship. Richard Roma is sales. Throughout the play, we never once get a true insight into the real Richard Roma. All we know is that he is good at his job, greedy and calculating. His demeanor changes on a dime; he is whoever he needs to be in whatever situation he happens to be in. This is his edge. Roma starts out as a pseudo-intellectual sitting in a restaurant. He sees a man that he has never met before, Mr. Lingk, sitting by himself. Roma decides to

  • If You Want to View Paradise

    2630 Words  | 6 Pages

    the island. Here the rarities mingled in an elite cocktail party for the terminally ill. The Ohia Lehua rooted shallow on the cliffsides, its wood trunk dry like beach wood and its blossoms a blood red exploding out like firecrackers from light green dime shaped leaves. Ala ala wai nui crawled out of holes in boulders. It is called a succulent, its leaves absorb water and are thick and peach fuzzed for it. It is strong enough to break rocks but can not conquer a field of pili grass. The Manono's leaves

  • Ice Hockey Vs. Roller Hockey

    769 Words  | 2 Pages

    as well as between the floor and the wheels. Turning, stopping, and making lateral movements are extremely easy to do on ice, but roller hockey is completely different. In roller hockey there is no such thing as making a tight turn or stopping on a dime, because the wheels just slide out from underneath the player. The stopping technique for roller hockey is basically the same as ice hockey, but the player slides a little before coming to a complete halt. If a player happens to fall in ice hockey

  • Brother Don T Spare A Dime Summary

    737 Words  | 2 Pages

    A Rebuttal of “Brother, Don’t Spare a Dime” In “Brother, Don’t Spare a Dime,” L. Christopher Awalt says that homeless people are homeless on their own accord. He believes “many of them seem to have chosen the lifestyles they lead” (Awalt))).. This article states that most homeless people would prefer to escape responsibility rather than fix their social and economic problems. Awalt uses an example of a man who had been on the streets for about 10 years. He provided this man with

  • Paralysis Epidemic of the 1950s: Poliomyelitis

    970 Words  | 2 Pages

    Poliomyelitis was declared an epidemic in the early 1950s in the United States. It caused primarily children and young adults to develop paralysis, led to social stigma around being crippled. To this day there is still no cure for this disease, poliomyelitis can only be prevented with vaccination. Poliomyelitis is a virus that infects the nerves of the spinal cord, and brain which leads to paralysis and or death (Piddock, 2004). Poliomyelitis is best known today as Polio, and Infantile Paralysis

  • The Censoring of J.D. Salinger´s The Catcher in the Rye

    672 Words  | 2 Pages

    Salinger, has been a target of controversy, debate, and discernment. This astounding novel is centered on a boy, Holden, who is writing his story within the confines of a psychiatric hospital. Through the recount, Holden encounters serious obstacles that are hard to deal with as a 17 year old. With prostitutes, teen sex, profanity, and other irrational behavior, one would understand the debated opinions of the novel. What is not understood, however, is how the story itself can be gained from. The Catcher