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Free Developmental biology Essays and Papers

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    Evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo) was instituted in the early 1980s as a distinctive field of study to characterise the new synthesis of evolution hypothesis (Müller, 2007). Evo-devo is regarded as a new rule in evolutionary biology and a complement to neo-Darwinian theories. It has formed from the combination of molecular developmental biology and evolutionary molecular genetics; their integration has helped greatly to understand both of these fields. Evo-devo as a discipline has been

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    not spread out and grow a new beak to adapt to every different food source. But if the single finch did not grow a new beak, how did its beak change to adapt to its environment? The answer lies in the molecular basis of evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo biology); specifically, the expression of calmodulin and BMP-4 during the embryonic development of Darwin’s finches is the driving force behind the speciation from the finches’ last common ancestor. The correct terminology for a slight difference

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    Caenorhibditis Elegans

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    elegans). C. elegans as a model organism for research in developmental biology is introduced by Sydney Brenner (Wood, 1988). Hope’s study that “Caenorhabditis elegans is a saprophytic nematode species that has often born described as inhabiting soil and leaf-litter environments in many parts of the world” (as cited in Leung et al., 2008, p. 5). According to Leung et al. (2008), the genetic manipulability, invariant and fully described developmental program, well-characterized genome, ease of maintenance

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    What are Caenorhabditis Elegans?

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    still viable. C. elegans have two genders, hermaphrodite and male. The hermaphrodite has two X chromosomes. It is self-fertilizing, which means it can produce offspring without needing another C. elegans. This is supported by Current Topics in Developmental Biology when they describe the genotype (Ross Wolff & Zarkower, 2008). When the hermaphrodite C. elegans are young they produce and store sperm. When the C. elegans is older, it then produces oocyte. According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary site

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    The developmental stages of an organism are vital, as the outcome will influence the organism from the moment it’s born to the moment it dies. Stem cells are the first cells that make up an organism; they are pluripotent giving them the ability to differentiate into any type of cell. Paratore and Sommer suggest that during organogenesis, the ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm develop into internal organs, and early in this stage the notochord is developed inducing the formation of the neural plate and

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    Embryos

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    Mechanisms of Epiboly of ectoderm in the Xenopus Laevis embryo Introduction Epiboly is a movement of gastrulation in the amphibian embryo, whereby ectodermal precursors expand to cover the entire embryo. This process occurs in the surface and deep layer cells in the animal and marginal regions. Three rounds of cell division occur in the deep cells, while they also rearrange to form fewer layers. Superficial cells elongate by cell division while flattening, which gives them greater surface area and

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    In the introduction of her 2003 book Developmental Plasticity and Evolution, West-Eberhard presents "Six Points of Confusion and Controversy". In her fifth point entitled “Troublesome Metaphors”, West-Eberhard states that metaphors will always be deficient in their ability to relate the complex interactions between genetics, development, and the environment. While I would agree with much of what West-Eberhard says about metaphors, she makes some points that will be questioned in this essay. The

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    Human Development (Conception-Birth)

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    much it took and how much had to go right for a baby to be born. Works Cited "The Reproductive System." Modern Biology. Orlando: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 2006. 1049-065. Print. Sigelman, Carol K., and Elizabeth A. Rider. Life-Span Human Development. Australia: Wadsworth Cengage Learning, 2009. 92-101. Print. Miller, Kenneth R., and Joseph S. Levine. Miller & Levine Biology. Boston, MA: Pearson, 2012. 992+. Print. "Human Development from Conception to Birth." Society for the Protection

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    1 Introduction: “The chief function of the body is to carry the brain around.” -Thomas Alva Edison- (1847-1931). Brain development is the most intriguing process of biology as in order to functionally establish the human central nervous system (CNS) about 1011 cells must be positioned accurately and more than 1015 connections between them need to be wired together to form functional neural circuits (Kandel et al. 2000). Santiago Ramόn y Cajal (1852-1934), more than one hundred years before, in his

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    Overview of Coloboma

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    paper ... ...Willer, G.B., Smith, K., Gregg, R.G., and Gross, J.M.(2008) Zebrafish blowout provides genetic evidence for Patched1-mediated negative regulation of Hedgehog signaling within the proximal optic vesicle of the vertebrate eye, Developmental Biology 319(1):10-22 Sanyanusin P., A.McNoe L., J.Sullivan M., Weaver R.Grey. Eccles M.R. (1995) Mutation of PAX2 in two siblings with renal-coloboma syndrome, Human Molecular Genetics Vol. 4, No. 11 2183-2184 Torres M, Gómez-Pardo E., Gruss p. (1996)

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