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    Crying Away Stress

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    Tearful Serenity: Crying Away the Stress Some days you've just had it. You've been talked at all day by people you couldn't care less about, the lady at the convenience store snapped at you, your friend invited herself over right when you had exactly one hour to write a paper, you got caught in a traffic jam going shopping, you're starting to seriously rethink your life career ... and now there's a thirty dollar parking ticket stuck on your windshield because that darn machine wasn't accepting

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    The Crying of Lot 49

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    There are two levels of apprehension to The Crying of Lot 49: that of the characters in the book, whose perception is limited to the text, and that of the reader, who has the ability to look at the world from outside of it. A recurring theme in the novel is the phenomenon of chaos, also called entropy. Both the reader and Oedipa have the same problems of facing the chaos around them. Through various methods, Pynchon imposes a fictional world of chaos on the world of the reader, a world already full

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    The Crying of Lot 49

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    Technology has long been recognized as a mixed blessing. Its up/downside nature was illustrated nicely in Walt Disney's Fantasia by the myth of the Sorcerer's Apprentice:not only does the "magic" of the machine produce what you desire, it often gives you much more than you can use--as Oedipa Maas, the heroine of this stark American fable, discovers on her frenetic Californian Odyssey. Information which strains to reveal Everything might well succeed only in conveying nothing, becoming practically

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    excitement of those who live around them. The Crying of Lot 49, can be classified as a novel that’s oddities in plot makes for a more interesting story. Although sometimes difficult for a reader to completely understand how and why the characters do what they do, the Crying of Lot 49, exemplifies the ideas of a postmodern piece of literature, and critiques the traditional values and ideas of life. Using the model outlined by Deleuze and Guattari, The Crying of Lot 49 is a paradigmatic example of postmodern

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    Simulation of a Capitalist Society: The Crying of Lot 49 In Jean Baudrillard’s, Simulacra and Simulations he discusses how symbols and signs constitute our reality and argues that our society has lost all connections to anything meaningful and real through the proliferation of signs and how that consequently leads our existence towards a simulation of reality. Sixteen years before the publication of Simulacra and Simulation, Thomas Pynchon’s 1966 novel, The Crying of Lot 49 parodies this idea of finding

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    In both Jack Kerouac’s, On the Road, and Thomas Pynchon’s Crying of Lot 49 the characters act in a deviant manner outside of social norms. This in turn leads to a deviant sub-cultural group which competes with the institutionalized authorities for power. Deviance in both novels is usually defined as a certain type of behaviour, such as an inebriated professor babbling on in a lecture hall filled with students or a group of teenagers frolicking naked in a city park on a hot and sunny afternoon. However

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    Thomas Pynchon's The Crying Lot 49

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    By “writing” Barry refers to cultural materialist criticism itself—not the work being criticized—but it is probably safe to assume that the analysis properly reflects the analyzed in this respect. It is certainly arguable that Thomas Pynchon’s THE CRYING OF LOT 49 qualifies as “difficult to place,” and this may be its only legitimate connection offered to a cultural materialist reading. Yet similarities arise between the text and the theory that suggest, at least on some level, a harmonious ideal

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    The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon

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    outlook and actions of these characters are what usually result in regrettable decisions and added anxiety for both that character as well as the reader. Examples of these themes affecting characters in the world of fiction are found in the novel The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon, and the play Glengarry Glen Ross written by David Mamet. Throughout both of these texts, characters such as Oedipa Maas who allows these emotions to guide her in her journey of self discovery, and Shelly Levene who is

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    The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon

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    In Thomas Pynchon’s novel The Crying of Lot 49, we meet Oedipa Maas; she travels down a rabbit hole of her own making, like Lewis Carrols Alice, from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Where Alice comes to self realization, Oedipa’s life ends up falling apart as she becomes more and more isolated and ends up with no closure. She goes through her life, in this story, assigning importance to things that may not be important at all, making a picture into a puzzle. In Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures

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    There are two levels of participation within The Crying of Lot 49:  that of the characters, such as Oedipa Maas, whose world is limited to the text, and that of the reader, who looks at the world from outside it but who is also affected the world created by the text.3  Both the reader and the characters have the same problems observing the chaos around them.  The protagonist in The Crying of Lot 49, Oedipa Mass, like the reader, is forced to either involve herself in the deciphering of clues or not

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