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Free Creole language Essays and Papers

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    Creole Language Essay

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    Creoles are a form or variant of a language that should be accepted by national governments and societies. Creoles and pidgins are variants of a language, often having English, French or other European languages as the “mother-language” that dominate the spoken language of a society. While creoles are established languages, such as Gullah and Papiamentu, pidgins are unofficial versions that are devised to speak with an unfamiliar language. When a pidgin language is taught to a younger generation

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    Essay On Creole Language

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    reflect what the culture that I live. I may not speak a creole language, but I have experienced the culture just the same. Words like, boudin or andouille, are not familiar to visitors or tourists to the state, but it’s something that feeds into the culture’s heritage. I have spoken with my fair share of people across the parishes, from New Orleans to Shreveport, and each place has their own style of language. Subsequently, creole languages should not be looked down as they have previously. Sometimes

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    Creole Language Analysis

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    Althusser, speaks to the hegemonic aspect of the state and the binaries of ruling class verses the working class. Regarding languages, the ruling class tends to focus more on the use of the standard English or the Queens language in most Anglophone Caribbean countries, whereas, the use of dialect or creole is seen as the language of working class. Therefore, the ruling class imposes its functions and practices on the working class as a means of control. In addition, Althusser divides the State into

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    All islands in the Caribbean share a similar colonial history which has caused creolization of languages, communities and culture. These creole language function as symbols of identity to those that are mainly of African and indigenous decent. This research paper written by Diana Ursulin Mopsus of the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras, entitled, “The Attitudes Toward Caribbean Creoles of European Descended Communities in Martinique and St. Croix” has the Caribbean as its target audience. The

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    Kate Chopin Blending the best elements from the French-Acadian culture and from the Old South, the Creole culture of Louisiana is one the richest and most fascinating areas for study. Kate Chopin and Alice Dunbar-Nelson are both writers who have brought this place and the people who live there to life through their writing. Because of their strong literary ties to Louisiana and the Creole culture, Dunbar-Nelson and Chopin have both, at times, been classified as "local-color" writers, a term

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    Theme of Isolation in The Awakening

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    the number of people who can understand her newfound language shrinks" (Ward 3). Edna's awakening from a conforming, Victorian wife and mother, into an emotional and sexual woman takes place through the use of self-expression in three forms: emotional language, art, and physical passion. The first form of self-expression Edna learns is the emotional language spoken by the Creole women. These "mother-women" of Grand Isle freely use language to express their frank emotions and illustrate the

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    Sargasso Sea." Critica 2.2 (Fall 1990): 193-206. Erwin, Lee. "'Like in a Looking Glass': History and Narrative in Wide Sargasso Sea." Novel 22.2 (1989): 207-16 Gregg, Veronica Marie. Jean Rhys' Historical Imagination: Reading and Writing the Creole. : North Carolina Press, 1995. Rhys, Jean. Wide Sargasso Sea, A Norton Critical Edition. (background and criticism), ed. By Judith L. Raiskin New York: W.W. Norton, 1999. Thomas, Sue. The Worlding of Jean Rhys. Westport, Conn. : Greenwood

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    Culture

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    such as Spain, Great Britain, and France, who brought African’s as slaves to work the fields. As a result of this combination of different cultures, Dominica contains characteristics that combine to make what is called Creole. This Creole is the mixing of these cultures in language, music, art, food, architecture, religion, dance, dress, and sports. France has had the most noticeable affect on Dominica, which is seen through the majority of Dominicans practicing Roman Catholicism, the French based

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    Kate Chopin's The Awakening Kate Chopin's novella The Awakening tells the story of Edna Pontellier, a woman who throughout the novella tries to find herself. Edna begins the story in the role of the typical mother-woman distinctive of Creole society but as the novelette furthers so does the distance she puts between herself and society. Edna's search for independence and a way to stray from society's rules and ways of life is depicted through symbolism with birds, clothing, and Edna's process of

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    Colonialism in the Caribbean

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    as a Socio-Cultural Area addresses the current cultural Caribbean with an eye on the past. For example, when discussing the emergence of creole culture Mintz specifically points out that this was almost exclusive to the islands colonized by the Spanish. According to Mintz, the Hispanic Caribbean was "settled by Europeans who had come to stay and to become "creoles"; nowhere and at no time in the Hispanic islands did African slaves ever outnumber freeman of European origin" (Mintz 28). Therefore, contemporary

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