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    As the Industrial Revolution was spreading throughout the United States, the construction of a more efficient cotton mill began in 1821 began in Lowell, Massachusetts. The Lowell Mill was genius - water powered and sure to duplicate over the next decade or so. The only remaining factor to complete this process would be labor workers. Luckily, most jobs in cotton factories required neither great strength nor special skills, so for the first time, women were considered as equal as men in the field

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    Working in Mills

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    Working in Mills The industrial revolution was rushing on at full steam and manufactured goods were at record demands. At a time when men were needed to dig the ditches build the bridges and do heavy manual labor there was still a need for lighter more tedious and just as perilsm jobs that required a specialized worker that of a smaller stature and with nimble hands and bodies that could navigate the crouded workspace of the "modern day" factories. The cotton mills in Lowell, Massachusetts were

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    led the South in textile production, Antebellum towns including Macon, Milledgeville, Madison, and Greensboro experimented with steam-powered cotton factories, with varying degrees of success. The steam-powered factories in Madison and Greensboro went broke in the 1850s, while those in Milledgeville and Macon survived to serve the Confederacy. Macon Cotton Factory the leading manufacturing sector of the United States in the years before the Civil War. Georgia's entrepreneurs began to experiment in

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    Child Labor

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    sometimes fatal, the era was only capable of the extraordinary profits and accomplishments it achieved because of child labor. They achieved the feats that they did because of the wide array of labor the children performed in factories, coal mines, and cotton mills. Children that worked in factories were cheaper to hire than adults and could be manipulated with physical abuse to work extensive hours and for low wages. The Industrial Revolution brought population increase which equaled to more child workers

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    historian. There are always several causes of vital events in history, which can be known as a hierarchy of causes. It is the basic understanding that if one thing happens another will lead on from it and so on e.g., if there wasn't demand for cotton, if the travel systems were not improved, or the inventions were never made the industrial revolution may never of happened. To help find these causes historians will also look at chronicles, to find out exactly when events happened. Before they

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    produce the textiles and cotton that Britain demanded and utilised their resources well. A good example of one of these factories would be Quarry Bank Mill. Quarry Bank Mill massively benefited from the growing population through these years, meaning

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    Factories and Slums in Victorian England

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    With this schedule, the workers were unable to get fully rested for the next day and continued to decrease their health. According to James, of Primary Facts, said, “In cotton mills, dust from the yarn covered the workers and got in their throats. In order to make sure that the cotton was kept strong, factory owners kept their mills warm and damp. This meant that the workers often suffered with lung and chest infections.” Not only did it tire them out to the point of exhaustion, but it also increased

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    Textile Industry Analysis

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    done by individual workers. However, as the years went by many workers were let go as their jobs were replaced by machines. Inventors came up with machines that could do all of the jobs that the workers in the mill could do but much faster. For example spinning mules which is used to spin cotton was invented by Samuel Crompton sometime between 1775 and 1779. Some people were happy with the jobs in the Textile Industry being done faster but many workers were angry as they were being let go of their jobs

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    The Start of America's Industrial Revolution

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    Concurrently, American textile companies began to offer rewards and bounties to mill workers who would emigrate from England bringing their knowledge of textile technology (World of Invention). At the same time, English-born, textile mill-trained, Samuel Slater illegally emigrated to the new country of America with secrets and memories of English textile technology. Within a year, Slater had established the first spinning mill in America, thus beginning the American Industrial Revolution. In order to

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    'enacted', (a law), and in the final sentence it states that this is 'law'. The style of writing is Old English and very formal this also indicates that it is an official document. It is addressed to the 'Masters' who were the owners of the cotton mills and factories and informed, them that they would be 'fined' if they broke the 'law'. In 1819, the date of the article, it would only have been the government that would have had the power to enforce such a regulation and punishment for non-compliance

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    were in transportation and industry. American society expanded so much in the early 1800's that it very well could have been the only time in history where this happened in such a short amount of time. From steamboats to railroads and from textile mills to interchangeable parts, the revolutions of this century were key to America's expansion as a country. First, the Transportation Revolution began early with simple roads. The National Road, from Baltimore to Illinois was finished in 1838. This road

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    The second industrial revolution: the fall of Britain, the rise of the rest Although the second industrial revolution was no longer focus on the development of textile industry, still, it accounted certain influences on the transformation on global cotton trading. It is widely believed that the second industrial revolution began in the second half of the nineteenth century and ended before the onset of First World War. The second industrial revolution also known as the technological revolution. Unlike

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    Manayunk

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    one of the oldest neighborhoods of Philadelphia which is also known as Main Street. In 1800's it was a part of Roxborough Township with very few residents (Images of America 8). This little town was formed of manufactures, laborers and farmers (the mills of manayunk 76). The town started out as "Flat Rock" in 1810, when the Flat Rock Turnpike and bridge were built connecting Roxborough Township with Merion Township. The name came from an area of flat rocks observed in the Schuylkill River, near the

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    Female Mill Workers

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    experiences of female mill workers in England and Japan are very similar through the ages of the workers, the conditions they had to work with, and the production of the mills. The ages of the feminine mill workers became a big part of the industrial revolution. In both Japan and England, the ages of the female mill workers ranged from their mid-teens to about 60 year of age. In England many female mill workers started working at a very young age, 40% began working in textile mills at the age of around

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    The industrial revolution was between the 18th and the 19th century. The time period is essentially considered to be one of the most vital moments in human development and is known as the single biggest leap in modern human evolution. To describe it simply, it was the transition from handwork to factory and machinery. During the industrial revolution, many families relocated from urban and rural conditions to the city, in hope to find a new and better life. Though all countries were affected by the

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    The Market Revolution

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    world’s major source for tobacco, cotton, and other agricultural products. A labor revolution started to occur in the United States throughout the early 1800’s. There was a shift from an agricultural economy to an industrial market system. After the War of 1812, the domestic marketplace changed due to the strong pressure of social and economic forces. Major innovations in transportation allowed the movement of information, people, and merchandise. Textile mills and factories became an important

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    with a great number of rivers and streams along the Atlantic seaboard, provided many potential sites for constructing textile mills necessary for early industrialization. The technology and information on how to build a textile industry was largely provided by Samuel Slater (1768–1835) who emigrated to New England in 1789. He had studied and worked in British textile mills for a number of years and immigrated to the United States, despite restrictions against it, to try his luck with U.S. manufacturers

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    An Analysis of The Industrial Revolution

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    A whistle blows early in the morning, signaling all mill workers to head to the factory in the darkness of the day’s dawn. The Industrial Revolution was the start of a time period in which the handmade goods were being replaced by the products of the newly, built mills that could produce more in less time for a better price. Competition between the handmade and the manufactured goods became a struggle for most Americans; they had to choose a side in the newly developing time period. Many chose to

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    Close by the giant textile mill row on row on row of drab terrace houses huddle together as if to fend off the bitter cold of a winter night in December of 1811. Night obscures the narrow streets of the industrial village of Holmeside as morning’s hesitant light pokes through the canopy of dismal clouds. Inside the mill, workers have been toiling for hours. They rose from their beds early and put on their work clothing. The lucky ones ate a crust of bread and drank the remains of yesterday’s milk

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    In August 1799, Robert Blincoe, at the age of seven, worked as a scavenger in the Gonalston Mill. He was one of the eighty seven-year-old children sold by the St. Pancras as parish apprentices. Although these children worked for fourteen hours a day, six days a week, their food consisted of only black bread and porridge. Robert Blincoe’s first job was to pick up loose cotton that fell on the floor. As easy as this job was, he was scared of the whirling motion and the noises the machine made. The

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