Contemporary Music Essays

  • A Philosophical Discussion in Contemporary Music: Jane's Addiction and Bush

    2400 Words  | 5 Pages

    A Philosophical Discussion in Contemporary Music: Jane's Addiction and Bush The purpose of this paper is to examine philosophical and theological themes in the work of two modern musical groups. The alternative rock bands Jane’s Addiction and Bush will be the focus of this study. I have chosen these two artists since I have observed what I believe to be contrasting ideas in their work. Perry Farrell was the songwriter for Jane’s Addiction. His band’s release in 1988, titled Nothing’s Shocking

  • Urban Music: Urban Contemporary Music

    527 Words  | 2 Pages

    Urban Music (Urban Contemporary Music) Urban Music, also commonly referred to as Urban Contemporary Music, is an aggregate of musical genres that developed in the 1970s in the United States as a form of music radio programming. The programming category gained particular traction in the 1980s and 1990s as an alternative to both Afro-American orientated stations that featured hard soul, funk, hiphop and rap material and to mainstream, white-orientated popular music radio programming, which only featured

  • Contemporary Music and the Effects It Has on Youth

    1049 Words  | 3 Pages

    Contemporary Music and the Effects It Has on Youth In a book written on Abraham Lincoln, the author states, "Who writes the Nation’s songs shapes the nation’s souls." (1) This statement is true. A quick look back at the music of the 1960's and 70's and the effects it had on society proves the statement. The question then arises, how does contemporary music effect modern society? More importantly how does it effect the most easily influenced group, the youth? There is no doubt that much of the

  • George Lucas's Films

    845 Words  | 2 Pages

    Critics' and National Society of Film Critics' awards. Pushing the boundaries of storytelling into new directions, American Graffiti was the first film of its kind to tell multiple stories through interweaving narratives backed by a soundtrack of contemporary music. It was Lucas's third film, 1977's Star Wars that changed everything. A deceptively simple morality tale of good versus evil told across a fantastic landscape of exotic planets and bizarre creatures, Star Wars became an international phenomenon

  • Contemporary Christian Music Analysis

    1990 Words  | 4 Pages

    In this light, Contemporary Christian Music, which is commonly denoted as CCM, is a popular music that features evangelical Christian lyrics in which, according to research, is the most widely consumed form of commercial entertainments for America's 70 to 80 million evangelical Christians (Lindenbaum, 2012). As an allegorical figure in the hearts of his

  • Geoffrey Chaucer: A Near Contemporary of Malory

    1055 Words  | 3 Pages

    Geoffrey Chaucer: A near contemporary of Malory Many websites contain information on the life and works of Geoffrey Chaucer. Most of these websites provide useful information, timelines, and miscellaneous facts about Chaucer. The Geoffrey Chaucer Page is a very helpful website that contains a brief note on Chaucer and provides a timeline of the important events which occurred during Chaucer’s lifetime . A better description of Chaucer and his works is given by Anniina Jokinen’s website, Luminarium

  • Borgmann’s Technology and the Character of Contemporary Life

    1609 Words  | 4 Pages

    Borgmann’s Technology and the Character of Contemporary Life The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate Borgmann’s theory of focal things in application to Tai Chi, as well as propose the opposition to it with an exercise machine as a device in the context of Borgmann’s Technology and the Character of Contemporary Life. In addition, I will try to argue that the resolution to the bifurcation between things and devices is a specific kind of equilibrium. First, Tai Chi, the old Chinese art

  • Contemporary Social Theory

    599 Words  | 2 Pages

    Two major approaches to contemporary social theory are the Marxian materialist approach and the structural functionalist approach. The materialist approach was developed from the work of Karl Marx, who believed that the economic order shapes society. The functionalist approach was developed from the work of Comte and Durkheim, stating that is the combination of all of society’s institutions that shapes society. An organic analogy is most often used to explain structural functionalism. The analogy

  • Contemporary Performance Issue

    1008 Words  | 3 Pages

    A Contemporary Performance Issue Commuting is a perfect example of a contemporary performance issue, “traffic congestion can steal valuable time from employees’ personal lives” (Wells par. 1). The typical employee is concerned with the time lost in commuting to work and not spent at home with their family. The family could be spouse, children, pets, parents, siblings etc.…If your everyday lifestyle started with the concern and time wasted just for commuting to and from work, you already started the

  • A Comparison of Classic and Contemporary Philosophers

    2368 Words  | 5 Pages

    A Comparison of Classic And Contemporary Philosophers Why is it so important that young children in our society receive a good education? The answer to that question is very simple; because they are our future. The old saying “the youth of today are the leaders off tomorrow” holds more truth than many people realize. By giving children a good start at an early age we are only helping ourselves as well as the children. A good example of this is can be seen in our society. By the time a teacher in

  • Identity, Perception, Action and Choice in Contemporary and Traditional

    3060 Words  | 7 Pages

    Identity, Perception, Action and Choice in Contemporary and Traditional "No-Self" Theories ABSTRACT: The ego is traditionally held to be synonymous with individual identity and autonomy, while the mind is widely held to be a necessary basis of cognition and volition, with responsibility following accordingly. However Buddhist epistemology, existential phenomenology and poststructuralism all hold the notion of an independent, subsisting, self-identical subject to be an illusion. This not only raises

  • Emilias Contemporary Stand

    829 Words  | 2 Pages

    Emilia’s Contemporary Stand In equation with the Elizabethan era, Shakespeare offers us a male dominated society in his renowned tragedy, Othello. Consequently, this definitely persuades a negative attitude and demeanor towards the women of the times. The female characters in the play: Desdemona, Emilia, and Bianca; play relevant roles in contributing to one’s understanding of this exhausted Elizabethan view. In contrast to the larger portion of the play, Emilia, spouse to the scandalous Iago

  • Contemporary Cosmology and Philosophy and the Beginning of the Universe

    3892 Words  | 8 Pages

    Contemporary Cosmology and Philosophy and the Beginning of the Universe ABSTRACT: Since the 1970s both in physics and cosmology, there has been a controversy on the subject of the ‘beginning of the universe.’ This indicates that this intriguing problem has reached scientific consideration and, perhaps, a solution. The aim of this paper is to try to answer the question as to whether the origin of the world has slipped out of the hands of philosophers (and theologians), and passed in its entirety

  • Dis/located Identities: Swinging and Contemporary Sexual Space

    3326 Words  | 7 Pages

    Dis/located Identities: Swinging and Contemporary Sexual Space A committed relationship without monogamy sounds like a contradiction in terms to those raised in America, or most any country at this point in history. The nature of commitment suggests that it requires a single partner and the promise to remain faithful to that person. Swingers choose a slightly different route and yet it is one that can involve more trust and openness than monogamous relationships offer. Swingers [1] are couples

  • Contemporary American Class Structure

    1330 Words  | 3 Pages

    Contemporary American Class Structure Social class is defined as 'people having the same social or economic status' (Wordnet). In contemporary American society, social class is based on the amount of money and property you have and also prestige. Prestige is given to a person through the line of work or the family that they come from. For example, upper-upper class member Jennifer Lopez reeks of prestige not only because she has millions of dollars in her bank account, but she has very expensive

  • Contemporary Themes of The Merchant of Venice

    1000 Words  | 2 Pages

    Contemporary Themes of The Merchant of Venice One of the many elements that make up a classic, is that the book, novel or play can be read in any generation, decade, century or in any part of the globe at any time and have relevance to the reader. The themes of the work should be universal, so that the reader can take something and create a parallel to an event or situation in his or her own life. The Merchant of Venice has elements that make it a classic. The Merchant of Venice has many

  • Mathematical Models of Spacetime in Contemporary Physics and Essential Issues of the Ontology of Spacetime

    3252 Words  | 7 Pages

    Mathematical Models of Spacetime in Contemporary Physics and Essential Issues of the Ontology of Spacetime ABSTRACT: The general theory of relativity and field theory of matter generate an interesting ontology of space-time and, generally, of nature. It is a monistic, anti-atomistic and geometrized ontology — in which the substance is the metric field — to which all physical events are reducible. Such ontology refers to the Cartesian definition of corporeality and to Plato's ontology of nature

  • contemporary diversity in the structure of the family

    2655 Words  | 6 Pages

    Q: Examine the sociological evidence concerning the idea that there is contemporary diversity in the structure of the family. The family is often seen as the corner stone of society. In pre-modern and modern societies alike it has been regarded as the most basic unit of social organisation and one that carries out vital tasks, such as the socialisation of children. Functionalists’ approaches to the family are based on the assumption that society operates on the basis of consensus and that there

  • The Contemporary Conflict of Values

    3338 Words  | 7 Pages

    The Contemporary Conflict of Values The conflict between values is the source of many conflicts and problems today. In contrast to the traditional conflict of values, the contemporary conflict is distinguished by these features: (1) extensiveness; (2) complicatedness; (3) profoundness; and (4) continuousness. The plurality and relativity of values is the primary cause of contemporary conflicts. The origin of pluralism lies in an interrelated trio of aspects: commodity economy, democratic politics

  • The Significance of System Cybernetics for Contemporary Philosophy- Post-Modernity in System Cybernetics

    3250 Words  | 7 Pages

    The Significance of System Cybernetics for Contemporary Philosophy- Post-Modernity in System Cybernetics ABSTRACT: I call the union of cybernetics and systems theory 'Systems Cybernetics.' Cybernetics and systems theory might be thought of a major source of today's striking development in cyber-technology, the science of complex adaptive systems, and so on. Since their genesis about the middle of this century, these two have gradually come to be connected with each other such that they have