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    Constitutional Politics

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    Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights were written, these documents still continue to shape American political culture. The Constitution seems to be the most powerful of American historical documents, giving rise to a constitutional politics in which every aspect of the document plays a vital role. The most heated political debates are often over the constitutionality, or lack thereof, concerning the issue in question. Differing interpretations of the Constitution allow for

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    A constitutional right?

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    A constitutional Right? Carl T Bogus, the author of a 1992 article, “ The Strong Case for Gun Control”, explains to the reader of the importance and relevance of tougher and more strict gun control laws in local governments today. Bogus begins by telling of the recent rise in school shootings and violent crimes in the united states. He explains that in 1998, more than four thousand children were killed by guns, and it took a string of school related shootings to bring that fact to the attention

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    constitutional law

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    Constitutional Law Marbury v. Madison Marbury v. Madison, one of the first Supreme Court cases asserting the power of judicial review, is an effective argument for this power; however, it lacks direct textual basis for the decision. Marshall managed to get away with this deficiency because of the silence on many issues and the vague wording of the Constitution. During the early testing period when few precedents existed, there was much debate about fundamental issues concerning what was intended

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    Constitutional Analysis

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    Freedom, or Order? "The Articles of Confederation were more democratic than the Constitution of the United States." True, the loose confederation of states underneath the Articles of Confederation were more democratic than the Constitution itself, but could that comparison really be considered bad? When examining such a statement, one must consider what values are important in government; freedom or order. Too much freedom creates anarchy, whereas too much order symbolizes a tyranny. So re-examining

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    Constitutional Arguments

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    Government Paper One When the Constitution was written two factions developed during the ratification process. The Federalist's were staunch supporters of the Constitution as it was. The Anti-federalists wanted the Constitution to contain stronger restrictions on the National government and wanted a Bill of Rights added. In thinking about this paper I tried to decided what I side I would have fallen on during the Constitution debates. After some thought, I came to the conclusion that I would have

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    Is it Constitutional to Bare Arms? “A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” These are the words of the second amendment as written by our forefathers. The question weather it is constitutionally legal or not has been debated for many years. In order to understand the true meaning of the above statement one must look back at the history surrounding it. The Bill of Rights was written over two

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    The Constitutional Issue of Abortion Three Works Cited    Many people believe abortion is only a moral issue, but it is also a constitutional issue. It is a woman's right to choose what she does with her body, and it should not be altered or influenced by anyone else. This right is guaranteed by the ninth amendment, which contains the right to privacy. The ninth amendment states: "The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained

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    Constitutional Democracy

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    Constitutional Democracy The basic premise of a constitutional democracy is that government has rules and all of the people have voices. Through free and fair elections we elect candidates to represent us. The Constitution of the United States guarantees us the right to do this, and to live democratically. The framers attacked tyrannical government and advanced the following ideas: that government comes from below, not from above, and that it derives its powers from the consent of the governed;

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    Constitutional Paideia

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    Constitutional Paideia Constitutional paideia designates a form of constitutionalism that construes a nation’s constitution essentially in terms of ongoing processes of collective self-formation. This paper explores the notion of constitutional paideia as formulated by Hegel, who explicitly defines constitutionalism with categories of Bildung. The paper’s strategy is to present Hegel’ position in light of questions that can be raised about it. The paper advances three central theses: (1) in spite

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    Hegel and the Russian Constitutional Tradition ABSTRACT: This paper advances the idea that Russian constitutionalism developed through a reinterpretation of Russian history in terms of Hegel's concept of the World Spirit. Russians implicitly viewed their nation as the embodiment of Hegel's World Spirit, which would have a unique messianic mission for humanity. However, the specifics of Russia's historical development diverged from Hegel's critical stage of ethical development, in which individuals

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