Free Constitution Essays and Papers

Sort By:
Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays

Free Constitution Essays and Papers

Page 5 of 50 - About 500 essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Constitution

    • 670 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The Constitution of the United States was created on September 17, 1787, but not everyone agreed that it should become the law of the land. Authors of the Constitution, James Madison and Alexander Hamilton, published The Federalist Papers to promote ratification of the Constitution by the States. The Federalist were committed to ensuring the Constitution was ratified. However, they were not without opposition. The Anti-Federalist opposed the Constitution and believed that it would cause the new

    • 670 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    established history and structure together with dialogs about interpretive inquiries confronted by high-court judges in diverse nations. The field of relative constitutionalism still needs reading material for specialists. To that end, INTERPRETING CONSTITUTIONS offers expositions depicting the shapes of sacred elucidation by high court judges in six nations: the United States, Canada, Australia, Germany, India, and South Africa... Be that as it may the authoritative parallelism does consider simple, recognizable

    • 863 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    the constitution

    • 1483 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The United States Constitution was adopted on September 17, 1787 by the constitutional convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It is the supreme law of the United States. After declaring its freedom from Great Britain after the Revolutionary War, America was in need of creating a government separate from the rule of the king. This task was not an easy one to accomplish. The first attempt at constitution, the Articles of Confederation, failed miserably. The constitution that was established in 1787

    • 1483 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    They are Native Americans who are trying to build better lives for themselves but are stopped in there tracks by the state supreme court. Proposition 5 passed in November of 98, which would allow more gambling in the Indian reservations. The proposition was ruled to be unconstitutional. Now the Indians are rebutting the fact that they are sovereign and the ballot was passed. Under existing law, Indian tribes operate as semi-sovereign nations, and are liable under federal law only. Recently, the

    • 2852 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Constitution

    • 1031 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 5 Works Cited

    The preamble introduces the constitution. It states that the government comes from the people. Its general purposes are in order to form a more perfect union we have to “Establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity.” (Remy, United States Government, McGraw Hill companies, Ohio, 2002) Its purpose is to make a good government and good laws, have peace in our homes, national

    • 1031 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 5 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Confederation and Constitution After the American Revolution, a new government had to be established. The Constitution that was written took power away from the people. It led to rebellions from poor people and farmers. Daniel Shays, a former Revolutionary Army captain, led a rebellion with farmers, against laws which were not fair to the poor. They protested against excessive taxes on property, polling taxes which obtained the poor from voting, unfair actions by the court of common requests

    • 1651 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    A Plan in the Making Some people have always wondered whether the making of Constitution of the United States was, in fact, supposed to happen at the Constitutional Convention or if it was even supposed to be drawn up in the way it was. In this essay, I will summarize to different views on what went on at the Constitutional Convention and how the Constitution of the United States come about. I want to emphasize that none of these views or theories discussed in this essay are my own. The convention

    • 920 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Constitution

    • 856 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited

    powerless to enforce any laws that they might have passed. Under the Articles of Confederation, each state printed its own money and there was no nationwide economy. Eventually the Articles of Confederation was replaced by the United States Constitution, which is still the governing document of the United States today. As the weakness that the Articles possessed became apparent, people began wanting changes in their government. Eventually as more interest was gained by more states, meetings were

    • 856 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Interpreting the Constitution

    • 1876 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 5 Works Cited

    1801 and 1825. Those who were in favor of states rights and a strict construction of the constitution fell under the leadership of Thomas Jefferson. These Jeffersonian republicans, also known as anti-federalists, believed in strict adherence to the writings of the constitution. They wanted state’s rights and individual rights, which they believed could only be granted under strict construction of the constitution. Thomas Jefferson, the third president, and James Madison, his successor, were close friends

    • 1876 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 5 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Constitution

    • 1436 Words
    • 3 Pages

    revising the constitution. Observed in historical context, ratification of the Constitution as is, voting against ratification, or voting to ratify only upon amendment with a bill of rights, depends on several factors. Some of these factors include individual state of representation, opinions on strength of national government, economic status, maintaining army in peacetime, executive branch power, and inclusion of a bill of rights. Anti-Federalists did not want to ratify the Constitution based on these

    • 1436 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays