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    Herbert R. Albert Camus: A Biography. New York: George Braziller Inc. 1980. Masters, Brian. Camus: A Study. London: Heinemann, 1974. McCarthy, Patrick. Camus: A Critical Study of his Life and Works. London: Hamish Hamilton, 1982. O'Brien, Conor Cruise. Albert Camus of Europe and Asia. New York: Viking Press, 1970. Quillot, Roger. The Sea and Prisons. University of Alabama: University of Alabama Press, 1970

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    The Great Potato Famine

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    population during the time of the blight. With the major population the potato was the main crop. The country’s population rapidly growing, it had reached about five million citizens at the time of the Union to well over the eight million mark in 1841 (O’Brien 103). With the population growing, the conditions of Irela... ... middle of paper ... ...’s position in the situation. Even before The Great Potato Famine, a cycle was beginning within the economy and government itself which in the end caused

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    intense, and has led to the emergence of two contending paradigms:  Modernization theory and dependency theory.  Upon close investigation, one realizes that both theories are problematic.  This paper is based on readings of Escobar, Martinussen, Cruise O'Brien, and Pieterse.  The purpose of this paper is to chronicle the origins and growth of development discourse, and to show how both paradigms share three flaws:  an economist approach to social change, and an ethnocentric and teleological worldview

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    William Butler Yeats, born in 1865, is regarded as one of the pioneers of poetry in the 1900s. He is most well-remembered for his work focusing on the myths, folklore and history of Ireland, his home nation, but his other pieces have also found their way into the hearts of people around the world past and present. In 1923, he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his contributions to English and Irish literature. Along with Ezra Pound and T.S. Elliot, he is one of the most famous canonical Modernist

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    How Celtic Folkore has Influenced My Family

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    Cited Browne, Ray B., William John Roscelli, and Richard J. Loftus. The Celtic Cross; Studies in Irish Culture and Literature. Freeport, NY: for Libraries, 1970. Print Desmond, Colm. Personal Interview. 3 November 2011. O'Brien, Máire, and Conor Cruise O'Brien. The Story of Ireland. New York: Viking, 1972. Print. Sims, Martha C., and Martine Stephens. Living Folklore: An Introduction to the Study of People and Their Traditions. Logan: Utah State UP, 2005. 99. Print. "The Origins

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    Causes of the French Revolution The French Revolution happened in France around the period 1789-92 (although these dates are disputed by historians), and resulted in the overthrow of the French monarchy and the Ancien Régime (the system of government). The monarchy in France had been established for many centuries, and the causes of the Revolution were deeply-rooted, including the problems with the Ancien Régime, the growth of nationalism, the influence of philosophers, and the example of the

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    the hell of 1984

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    The Hell of Nineteen Eighty-Four. ). Did Orwell realise quite what he had done in Nineteen Eighty-Four? His post-publication glosses on its meaning reveal either blankness or bad faith even about its contemporary political implications. He insisted, for example, that his 'recent novel [was] NOT intended as an attack on Socialism or on the British Labour Party (of which I am a supporter)'.(1) He may well not have intended it but that is what it can reasonably be taken to be. Warburg saw this immediately

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    Irish Famine

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    The Irish Potato Famine was a period of starvation, disease and emigration, and was known as one of the biggest tragedies from 1845 to 1847. Many people depended on potato crops to survive; however [comma] the potato crops acquired blight, a disease that caused the potatoes to rot while still in the ground. No good crops could be grown for two years [comma] causing Irish tenant farmers unable to pay rent and was forced off their land causing over 21,000 people to die of starvation. The Irish Potato

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    Analysis of Seamus Heaney's North

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    Analysis of Seamus Heaney's North The poet Keats wrote that “the only means of strengthening one’s intellect is to make up one’s own mind about nothing – to let the mind be a thoroughfare for all thought, not a select body”. That this may be an admirable aim for a poet, and especially so for one writing against a background of ethnic violence, is not in doubt. It is, however, extremely difficult to remain neutral when one identifies oneself with an ethnic party involved in conflict. It is my intention

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    Eamon De Valera

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    Eamon de Valera, although born in New York City, in the United States of America, devoted his life to help the people of Ireland. As he once said it, “If I wish to know what the Irish want, I look into my own heart.” De Valera loved Ireland and its people with a deep and lasting passion. It was he, probably more than any other person in their history, who helped that country win freedom from British rule and then shaped its history well into the twentieth century. De Valera’s mother, Catherine Coll

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