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    Drawing The Boundaries Of The Ethical Self

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    Drawing The Boundaries Of The Ethical Self This paper evaluates some philosophical views regarding the self who is an ethical deliberator and agent-specifically the traditional atomistic individualist self and the expanded biocentric self of deep ecology. The paper then presents an alternative manner of thinking about the ethical self which avoids some of the philosophical difficulties of the foregoing views. This alternative draws on the recent work by Val Plumwood and Donna Haraway. Haraway's

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    Historical Development of Self Concept Theory The development of idea of self or self-concept can be traced back into the times of classical philosophy, as traced by Hattie (1992). A sense of self was related to Greek philosophers such as Plato and Aristotle to identity, individuality and the knowledge of self (). Further, Renaissance philosophers promoted a sense of “self” and “knowing self” as the basis of existence through their debates. Hume (1711-1776) brought about a diversion from the intellectual

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    Self Esteem and Culture Self esteem is all about how much people value them self, the pride they feel in themselves, and how worthwhile they feel. Self esteem is important because feeling good about yourself can affect how you act. A person who has high self esteem will make friends easily, is more in control of his or her behavior and will enjoy life more (Heine). To begin you must understand that there is a difference between high self esteem, arrogance, and pride. Arrogance is a negative trait

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    sense of who we are. This self concept involves such things as our traits, our values and morals, and our interests. As this sense of self forms, it becomes increasingly necessary for us to preserve the idea of who we think we are and thus create harmony within our cognition; we want to uphold a consistent self-image, and often times a positive one. That being said, of course, we face every day situations which challenge this, and we sometimes do things that go against our self-image, causing discomfort

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    Importance of Self-Image in the Loman Family

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    play depicts America as the land of opportunity as well as a place where the society has acquired a new set of values that threatens to destroy those who cannot abide by new changes. This paper discusses the importance of self-image in the Loman family and how the conceptions of self-image fuel the destruction of the characters. To begin with, the plot structure of the play does not follow a logical sense of development; rather the progression has an aesthetic appeal, which is similar to the concept

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    behaviors. An individual consists of three different concepts within their self. These would be self-efficacy, self-esteem, and the self-concept. These concepts interact and develop who someone is and how they are perceived in the social world. As the self becomes more defined through self-esteem, efficacy, and concept, ones insight on them selves can become much clearer. Social surroundings affect the awareness of the self, and differences in the environment such as age, health, and socioeconomic

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    five

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    research articles that investigates this motive. I am starting with a brief overview of Fiske’s social needs model. His model can be very easily remembered by using the acronym BUC(k)ET. This stands for Belonging, Understanding, Controlling, Enhancing Self, and Trusting. The model is intended to and is designed specifically to explain how we will behave in social situations. The core social motive is belonging and is considered the essential core. According to Fiske we must be able to interact with others

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    she presents the reader with a somewhat unstable and sometimes scary family situation. Through her narrative, Borich proves that this type of environment is destructive for a growing girl. With most of her family, Barrie is unable to be her true self. Her mother is not comfortable with Barrie’s lesbianism. In Slouching towards Chicago, Barrie has a conversation with her mother that reveals her mother’s attitude towards her sexuality. Her mother asks her if she’d ever “do things” with women (21)

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    Self Identity

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    John Knowles uses the theme of self-identity throughout his book, A Separate Peace, using two boys to not only challenge each other as friends, but as who they truly are . The book starts off with Gene visit Devon, his old prep school, 15 years after graduating, looking around the school's campus and remembering all the events that had happened over the years spent there. While looking around the campus, he takes into view an old tree which brings back memories of his friend Finny, remembering all

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    internal conflicts if you completely lose your self identity. Some would argue that being yourself will make you happier by not pretending to be someone you’re not. Others insist that being yourself will separate you from everyone and always feel lonely. On the other hand, I believe being true to ourselves will enable people to see our real identity without a disguise. People will see what we are really like on the inside and they can appreciate our real self. In American Born Chinese, Gene Yang argues

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