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    Conceit and Misfortune in Oliver Goldsmith’s The Vicar of Wakefield From three hundred years of Ireland’s history, The Penguin Book of Irish Fiction1[1] collects a combination of complete works and samples of the works of many great Irish authors. Among the authors included in this volume is Oliver Goldsmith, an Irishman of great diversity in his writings and remembered perhaps as well for his individuality, character and generosity as for the various poems, essays, and works of fiction that

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    Metaphysical Conceit in the Poetry of John Donne Many of John Donne's poems contain metaphysical conceits and intellectual reasoning to build a deeper understanding of the speaker's emotional state. A metaphysical conceit can be defined as an extended, unconventional metaphor between objects that appear to be unrelated. Donne is exceptionally good at creating unusual unions between different elements in order to illustrate his point and form a persuasive argument in his poems. By using metaphysical

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    employ Petrarchan conceit to praise their lovers. Applying this type of metaphor, an author makes elaborate comparisons of his beloved to one or more very dissimilar things. Such hyperbole was often used to idolize a mistress while lamenting her cruelty. Shakespeare, in Sonnet 18, conforms somewhat to this custom of love poetry, but later breaks out of the mold entirely, writing his clearly anti-Petrarchan work, Sonnet 130. In Sonnet 18, Shakespeare employs a Petrarchan conceit to immortalize his

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    by looking to his conception of the origin of the most rudimentary institutions of humanity, primordial piety— fear of the mythic other— is shown to be the origin of poetic wisdom. And, by focusing on the necessity of surmounting the conceit of scholars and the conceit of nations for a science of universal history, philosophical piety— openness to the wholly Other— is revealed as the ground of philosophical wisdom. This paper sets out to show how Vico’s science of the principles of humanity is, at

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    Donne uses a spherical image as the central metaphor in his poem. When Donne uses irony, paradox, and hyperbole including the use of round images such as: coins, globes, and tears he strengthens the spherical conceit.  By comparing two "seeming" opposites like tears and love as his conceit, Donne uses the spherical image as the central paradox in "A Valediction: Of Weeping." Donne opens the poem with the speaker crying while talking to his lover before his departure abroad.  His first spherical

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    F. Scott Fitzgerald in Hollywood

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    Years later, Fitzgerald commented on this time in Hollywood, At that time, I had been generally acknowledged for several years as the top American writer both seriously and, as far as prices went, popularly. I...was confidant to the point of conceit. Hollywood made a big fuss over us and the ladies all looked very beautiful to a man of thirty. I honestly believed that with no effort on my part I was a sort of magician with words...Total result - a great time and no work. I was to be paid only

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    LIVING TO DIE

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    energy, and right before winter when everything is dead and ceased to be. He goes on to say 'That time of year thou mayst in me behold when yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang upon those boughs which shake against the cold"(579). Shakespeare uses conceit to elaborately compare his furtherance of age to the aging tree in the fall. Just as the tree is helpless and naked to the elements, Shakespeare is naked and helpless in the hands of time. Furthermore, Shakespeare portrays the fact that his death

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    poem, Donne's focus is on the exploration of the new world, which he then twists around to imply that his entire world is formed between his mistress and himself. "[Love] makes one room an everywhere." (l. 10) His poetic conceit (conception) is an explication of the emotional conceit (vanity) underlying love. A clearer example of the universalization of love is seen in "The Sun Rising" with the lines "She is all states, and all princes I,/Nothing else is." (ll. 21-22) With the equal weight of both his

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    Pride

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    performing the same demeaning drills as they are. The sergeant’s years of hard work and service would not be taken seriously if he were to lower himself to the level of their recruits therefore lowering his sense of pride. Too much pride can lead to conceit or what we commonly call a big head. By 1340 AD, pride was comparable to arrogance. (OED 1) Later during the Middle Ages there were seven...

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    Egotism and Love in Shakespeare's Sonnet 42

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    young man and the poet in the choice of diction that is used. The first line of the sonnet "That thou hast her," uses strong alliterative qualities in the stressed first syllables of each word. In doing so, the imagery that is created is one of conceit and arrogance on the behalf of Shakespeare. Generally, a man who has been cuckold by the infidelities of his mistress is not so swift to forgive his betrayer. Instead, he narcissistically tells the friend that the affair is "not all [his] grief"

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    Metaphysical Conceit

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    Metaphysical Conceit Metaphysical Conceita highly ingenious kind of conceit widely used by the metaphysical poets, who explored all areas of knowledge to find, in the startlingly esoteric or the shockingly commonplace, telling and unusual analogies for their ideas. Metaphysical conceits often exploit verbal logic to the point of the grotesque and sometimes achieve such extravagant turns on meaning that they become absurd (e.g. Richard Crashaw's description of Mary Magdalene's eyes as "Two

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    Elizabethan Sonnets

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    In Elizabethan Age, the sonnets had advanced into a form with new metric and rhyme scheme that was departing from Petrarchan sonnets. Yet, Elizabethan sonnets still carried the tradition of Petrarchan conceit. Petrarchan conceit was a figure used in love poems consisting detailed yet exaggerated comparisons to the lover's mistress that often emphasized the use of blazon. The application of blazon would emphasize more on the metaphorical perfection of the mistresses due to the natural objects were

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    The Metaphysical Conceit

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    (Donne). It is the very nature of the metaphysical conceit: to remove itself from the world of the tangible yet project an image far more moving than its literal counterpart. It is to go above and beyond the world of the immediate, to transcend the physical and stay bound to its origin, its comparison, while floating in the dreamy ether. The quote featured above serves as an accurate catch-all for what threads compose the complex weave of conceit: purely earthly knowledge, pure reason and sense, cannot

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    The Failure of Crace’s Quarantine Quarantine is the latest installment in a sub-genre of literature where the central conceit is to tell a story from the point of view of the minor characters in a famous tale, with the more renowned stars of the originals taking in subordinate roles.  Quarantine he tells the story of Christ's forty days in the wilderness, but with Jesus shunted to the periphery, in favor of several other pilgrims.  In particular, the novel focuses on a trader, Musa--dishonest, loutish

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    Gluttony in Doctor Faustus

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    surfeits our senses with images of gluttonous, swollen, and surfeited allusions.  In fact, Faustus appears to be a fathead because his head has become swollen in self-conceit due to his attempt to understand more than it is within the power of humans to know.  According to Marlowe (23-24), "Till swoll'n with cunning, of a self-conceit,/His waxen wings did mount above his reach/And melting, heavens conspired his overthrow!/For falling to a devlish exercise/And glutted now with learning's golden gifts/He

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    Hamlet

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    portraying him. “O, what a rogue and peasant slave am I!/Is it not monstrous that this player here,/But in fiction, in a dream of passion,/Could force his soul so to his own conceit/That from her working all his visage wann’d,/Tears in his eyes, distraction in’s aspect,/A broken voice, and his whole function suiting. With forms to his conceit?” In this soliloquy, he is questioning how other people become emotional. He asks what Hecuba means to the mere actor on stage, who cried because of her. He wonders

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    so emotional over a speech that he is reading, while Hamlet, who is actually in the real situation, is passive in his emotions, "Is it not monstrous that this player here, but in a fiction, in a dream of passion, could force his soul so to his own conceit." (2:2:520). In Act IV Hamlet expresses admiration for Fortinbras' courage and ambition to succeed and to fight for his name and honor, (".led by a delicate and tender prince, whose spirit, with divine ambition puffed." (4:4:48). Although both comparisons

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    Determining One's Fate

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    novel whose point of view is limited first or third person and whose solution is kept till the end. The autobiographer's conceit is to indicate the clues which might have revealed his character even then if only one had been an imaginative enough "reader" to see these clues, clues such as his preference for observation and his interest in art. James supports the conceit that he was always a writer by sometimes referring to "Fate" which seems, at first, to be at odds with James's acknowledgement

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    Kafka's Hunger Artist

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    Kafka's Hunger Artist Kafka, in his masterpiece "The Hunger Artist," suggests that humans can never satisfy their desires. This is illustrated through the metaphorical hunger artist for whom nourishment is not being nourished at all. The viewing public's interest is derived from their desire to see the hunger artist cheating, but to view this would put an end to that desire. Finally, Kafka presents this idea while the artist is at the circus and describing when people wish to view the starved

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    of suspension” (49).” The flower he wore shows that he does not care about school or his teachers: his teachers felt “that his whole attitude was symbolized by his shrug and his flippantly red carnation flower” (50). The principal also noted his conceit as he left the meeting and bowed which was described to be “a repetition of the scandalous red carnation” (51). It is almost as if the flower is his strength and reminds him of his ne...

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