Free Cochlear Essays and Papers

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Free Cochlear Essays and Papers

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    cochlear implants

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    Cochlear Implants A cochlear implant is an electronic device that restores hearing for people anywhere from hard of hearing to the profoundly deaf. The cochlear implant is surgically implanted under the skin behind the ear. The surgeon puts the electrode array inside the inner ear and than inside the cochlea. The implant works by a device outside the ear, which rests on the skin behind the ear. It is held upright by a magnet and is also connected by a lead to a sound professor. What happens when

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    Cochlear Implants

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    Cochlear Implants As the life expectancy of the general population continues to increase, so has the number of people experiencing varying types of perceptual loss. One area of perceptual loss that is gaining more and more recognition is auditory functioning. The number of individuals experiencing a post-lingual hearing loss, or hearing loss after the acquisition of language, is increasing among the older adults in our society. This increase has facilitated a need for a means of managing such

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    Cochlear Implant

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    severely damaged. Ranges of technology such as hearing aids continue to expand and assist victims of hearing loss, however; the technology scientists had produced and offered to the public in the past, could only amplify sound. The development of the cochlear implant had significantly expanded ever since an Australian otolaryngologist, Professor Graeme Clark and his team of three Melbourne health professionals- audiologist Professor Richard Dowell, surgeons Dr Robert Webb and Dr Brian Pyman had successfully

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    Cochlear Implants and the Internet

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    criticism. Since my specialty is education of the deaf and hard-of-hearing (D/HH), I have been exposed to the highly emotionally charged debates on the issue of cochlear implants (CI). I was interested in finding out how easy (or difficult) it would be for hearing parents with deaf children to receive balanced and unbiased information on cochlear implants. Could they acquire the knowledge they would need in order to make informed decisions on behalf of their children on the World Wide Web? For those

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    Cochlear Implants

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    common among the deaf. My mother’s speech is very outstanding, and her lip reading is fantastic. I haven’t met many other deaf people with such great speaking ability. Growing up she would always get told, “Kerrie, why don’t you consider getting a cochlear implant?” With her being very confident, secure, and proud of who she is and the community in which she has grown up in, she refused every time the question was asked. Although she was a good candidate, she stood her ground for what she felt was

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    Cochlear Implants and Their Effect on d/Deaf Society Deafness is described as a partial or total inability to hear. It can be caused by many different factors like aging, exposure to noise, illness, or chemicals and physical trauma or any combination of these. A hearing test called audiometry can be used to determine the severity of the hearing impairment. There are several measures that can be taken to prevent hearing loss; however, in some cases due to disease, illness, or genetics, deafness is

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    Are Cochlear Implants Necessary?

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    world highly over populates the deaf communities making most deaf children feel out of place compared to the other children. The deaf culture has struggled over the years by conflict to maintain its total population due to the medical breakthrough of cochlear implants. In 1950, by Lundberg the “Powerhouse Museum” stated that Lundberg performed the first recorded attempts to stimulate the auditory nerve, the nerve that is defective causing the loss of hearing, however the patient was only able to hear

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    instance, the technology to at least partially overcome has existed since the early 80’s. While not a complete cure, as results and effectiveness vary from patient to patient, Cochlear implants seem to a simple answer available to those who affected by serious hearing loss. As of 2012, over 300,000 people have utilized cochlear implants to overcome their disability. However, deafness is not a disability alone, but comes with a unique culture and background in

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    Cochlear Implants Essay

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    learning and development (Connor et al., 2006). One viable solution to this problem takes the form of cochlear implants. An artificial cochlear unit is surgically implanted in the ear and functions by translating sounds directly into electrical impulses and sending them to the brain (Roland & Tobey, 2013, p. 1175). Despite the high success rates that they have produced, critics contend that cochlear implants should not be carried out on very young children. They cite certain physiological concerns

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    transmitting sound signals to be processed in the brain. Fortunately, a relatively recent medical innovation involving cochlear implants allows these individuals, who would otherwise be deaf, to perceive sound. Cochlear implantation is a safe procedure performed on individuals with profound sensorineural hearing loss in which an electric device is surgically embedded behind the ear. The cochlear implant acts as a transducer, collecting sound and converting it to an electrical signal that bypasses the defective

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