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    treated as second class citizens. The Civil Rights Movement was ongoing and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was being enforced. Unlike my parents, aunts and grandparents, when I got older I only heard of the Civil Rights Movement and Act of 1964 in school, and did not know that I was reaping the benefits from it until I was old enough to understand. Unlike the generation before me, I didn't have to deal with laws that did not protect their individual's rights, resulting in them being discriminated

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    Civil Rights Act of 1964

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    The Civil Rights Act of 1964 resulted from one of the most controversial House and Senate debates in history. It was also the biggest piece of civil rights legislation ever passed. The bill actually evolved from previous civil rights bills in the late 1950’s and early 1960’s. The bill passed through both houses finally on July 2, 1964 and was signed into law at 6:55 P.M. EST by President Lyndon Johnson. The act was originally drawn up in 1962 under President Kennedy before his assassination.

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    The Civil Rights Act of 1964

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    Before the Civil Rights Act of 1964, segregation in the United States was commonly practiced in many of the Southern and Border States. This segregation while supposed to be separate but equal, was hardly that. Blacks in the South were discriminated against repeatedly while laws did nothing to protect their individual rights. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 ridded the nation of this legal segregation and cleared a path towards equality and integration. The passage of this Act, while forever altering

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    called “boy”. This concept should have been achieved by the Civil Rights Act of 1964, but through the eyes of many African Americans it wasn’t. The cultural movement during the 1960’s, the civil rights movement, and the changing views and opinions of many Americans brought about the legislative changes of the times, especially the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The white conservative government of the era operated at a sluggish pace on civil rights legislation leading to controversy and criticism. Along

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    Civil Rights Act Of 1964

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    Civil right laws provide numerous examples on which individuals are protected by law. This paper provides simple examples of civil and criminal protection laws, by briefly describing a few civil right laws and the ways these laws may be utilized to improve or understand citizen rights. First, the student describes the sexual harassment law, which is explained in a simple manner but is violated none the less. Second, the student explains defamation, intimidation, discrimination and at-will employment

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    The American Civil War ended in 1865, the Emancipation Proclamation freed the slaves, yet a century later, the United States was not an equal country. The Emancipation Proclamation may have freed the slaves from their masters, but it did not ensure freedom in society. African Americans faced abuse, segregation, and discrimination in every corner. Some African Americans moved to the North, it had been an escape from slavery before, yet the North was no longer a safe haven, African American faced the

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    Civil Rights Act of 1964 Civil Rights has played an enormous role in America today. It provides political, social, and educational freedom. Civil Rights gives all people the right to live freely. The Civil Rights movement began in the 1950’s to ensure all people were treated equally, despite their race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. Although Abraham Lincoln ended slavery on January 1, 1863, African-Americans still had far to go in order to be treated equal. The Act of 1964 changed the

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    Civil Rights Act of 1964 The Civil Rights Act of 1964 banned discrimination on the basis of race, sex, religion, or national origin by employers, and unions, and established the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Discrimination was not fully abolished, however, it opened the door to further progress. This further progress would result to an enactment of various other acts to help support the rights and cases of African-American people. The main goal of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

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    embody during the 1960’s. The Civil Rights Act of 1964, one of the laws made to benefit the southern black population of the U.S and all people of color suffering in America, was pressured by President John F. Kennedy and ratified by President Lyndon B. Johnson. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 impacted history by granting people of color freedoms, significantly desegregating the south, and inspiring acts and laws, such as the Voting Rights Act and the Fair Housing Act, that would not be possible without

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    Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

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    "Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is the single most important piece of legislation that has helped to shape and define employment law rights in this country (Bennett-Alexander & Hartman, 2001)". Title VII prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, age, gender, disability, religion and national origin. However, it was racial discrimination that was the moving force of the law that created a whirlwind of a variety of discriminations to be amended into Title VII. Title VII was a

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