Free Cinematic Interpretation Essays and Papers

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Free Cinematic Interpretation Essays and Papers

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    Michael Hoffman's Adaption of A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare Michael Hoffman’s 1999 adaptation of William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream received more acclaim then most adaptations previous to it. The well-known cast of actors, as well as the incredible visual effects used are the two most likely reasons for the film’s appeal to the masses. Even though the film’s casting and special effects brought people into the theaters to see the film, it isn’t what kept them there

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    hold a third dimension as well. Accompanying the vision of the future, and the aliens, and the spaceships is a deeper, moral message aimed towards its audience. The first notable motion picture to show this, and regarded as one of the greats in cinematic history, was ‘Metropolis’ (Fritz Lang, 1927) a full153 minutes long, compared to Le Voyage’s measly 14. Not only was Metropolis a technical triumph for its time, it holds a meaning and a stor... ... middle of paper ... ...tands the test of

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    If you were to ask many video game enthusiasts about their favorite female video game heroines, the answers you’d get would be very varied - some will say Lara Croft of the Tomb Raider series, others say Alyx from the Half-Life series, few say Jade from Beyond Good & Evil, a handful will vouch for Chell from Portal, and a lot of old-school folks might just say Ms. Pac-Man. However, there is another video game heroine who has managed to reach into the hearts of gamers, both male and female, proving

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    The Mass-Western Protagonist

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    isolation—unnecessarily using words—and later, of course, by getting killed by the bandi... ... middle of paper ... ... the typical Western protagonist becomes as unreal as a fairy-tale character. And the point of the various deconstructivist interpretations of the Western seems to be just that, that the Western genre is as limited and ritualized as any other. In fine, the cowboy-hero becomes progressively weaker as genre self-consciousness increases. Within his own world, Pat Brennan is nigh-invincible;

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    in its cinematic technique as well as its carefully executed plot, which exposes the psychological decomposition of the two murderers as their deed is gradually discovered. However, the aspect of the real case that is not explicitly addressed in the film as a result of the censorship codes at the time, but one of the primary reasons that Hitchcock was initially attracted to the project, is the homosexuality of the two young men, a factor which becomes pivotal to a Freudian interpretation of the film

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    The Short Life of Anne Frank by Gerrit Netten

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    In this essay, I will aim to discuss and analyse my chosen documentary ‘The Short Life of Anne Frank’ by Gerrit Netten, with cinema dramatization of real events ‘The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas’ by Mark Herman. I will be focusing on how each director uses techniques to show true aspects of real life, and how this persuades the audience into believing that they are witnessing something accurate, and true to the directors intention. Gerrit Netten’s 2001 documentary ‘The Short Life of Anne Frank’

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    Latinos, Politics, and American Cinema

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    Latinos, Politics, and American Cinema Feature films in the United States influence American viewers' attitudes on a wide variety of topics. Americans attitudes toward politics are shaped by films, and specifically the politics of racial interaction. The history of modern feature films begins with Birth of a Nation (1915), a film that misrepresents the Black race by justifying the existence and role of the Ku Klux Klan in American society. From this racist precedent, producers and directors understood

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    The Irrelevant God in A Farewell to Arms A Farewell to Arms begins with a god's-eye-view, cinematic pan of the hills surrounding Gorizia-the camera of our mind's eye, racing forward through time, sweeps up and down the landscape, catching isolated events of the first year in the town as it goes. The film ultimately slows to a crawl, passing through the window of a whorehouse to meet the eyes of Frederic Henry watching the snow falling. As we attach ourselves to Frederic Henry's perspective we

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    Jones, Laura, adapt. The Portrait of a Lady. By Henry James. Dir. Jane Campion. Videocassette. PolyGram, 1997. Nadel, Alan. "The Search for Cinematic Identity and a Good Man: Jane Campion's Appropriation of James's Portrait." Henry James Review 18.2 (1997): 180-183. Volpe, Edmond L. "James's Theory of Sex." Twentieth Century Interpretations of The Portrait of a Lady: A Collection of Critical Essays. Ed. Peter Buitenhuis. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1968. Walton, Priscilla L

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    Love, Death and Transformation in Ginger Snaps On the surface, Ginger Snaps can be easily dismissed by critics as a typical B-rated teen-turned-werewolf movie. What distinguishes this movie from other horror films, however, is its subversion of the traditional perspective of its genre. The transformation in the film is suffered by Ginger Fitzgerald, a sixteen-year-old girl. This lycanthropy coincides with Ginger's first menstrual period, making the subject matter metaphorical for the often fearful

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