Free Christian Wolff Essays and Papers

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Free Christian Wolff Essays and Papers

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    enlightenment in Germany

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    Germany is one of many countries that embraced the enlightenment during the revolutionizing and expanding 19th and 20th centuries. Many things tied into why they are thought to embrace it such as; people (philosophers and writers), historic events, art, and music from that time period. One philosopher in particular contributed greatly to this advancement, and his name is Immanuel Kant. His works such as “Answering the question: What is Enlightenment?” and his widely known; three critiques, influenced

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    What is Enlightenment? Emmanuel Kant

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    In his essay writing “What is Enlightenment?” Immanuel Kant defines enlightenment as “man’s emergence from his self-imposed immaturity” (Kant, 1). In order for us to completely understand this definition, we must first understand what Kant meant by “Immaturity”. In the writing Kant defines immaturity as “the inability to use one’s understanding without the guidance from another”(Kant, 1). Furthermore, Kant believes that this immaturity is self-imposed, and that it is the individual’s fault for lacking

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    Kate Chopin's The Awakening", Cynthia Griffin Wolff creates what Ross Murfin describes as "a critical whole that is greater than the sum of its parts." (376) By employing a variety of critical approaches (including feminist, gender, cultural, new historicism, psychoanalytic and deconstruction) Wolff offers the reader a more complete (albeit complex) explanation of Edna Pontellier's behavior and motivations than any single approach could provide. Wolff contends that locating the source of Edna's repression

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    in Kate Chopin’s The Awakening” Cynthia Griffin Wolff sees the lack of a language—for Edna Pontellier’s sexual desires in particular and female sexuality in general—as the main theme in Chopin’s novel. She particularly looks at how issues of sexuality remain unsaid in the novel, or how they are expressed in a different way, because of the lack of a language of feminine sexuality. As Ross C Murfin points out in his introduction to this essay, Wolff combines several theoretical perspectives such as

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    Socrates

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    Socrates calmly debates with each friend over the moral value and justification of such an act. “...people who do not know you and me will believe that I might have saved you if I had been willing to give money, but that I did not care.” -Crito (Wolff 37). Crito believed that by helping Socrates to escape, he could go on to fulfill his personal obligations. Also, if Socrates does not follow the plan, many people would assume that his friends did not care about him enough to help him escape or that

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    historicism, and psychoanalytic criticism. Much like Yaeger and Treichler, Wolff attributes Edna’s struggle and eventual demise to her failed search for a language that voices her (un)womanly desires. Wolff first adopts the new historicist viewpoint to situate Edna as a 19th-century southern woman, presenting a very real conflict between: the dominating values of her time and place; and her own innermost passions and needs. Wolff additionally deconstructs traditional ideals of sexuality, adultery, and

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    Wolff’s Critique of Chopin’s The Awakening The critical case study to the novel establishes a definition of a type of critical response, and then gives as close an example that fits that mode of criticism—BORING! First, the book has these forms of criticism laid out contiguously, as if they occurred only spatially and not temporally. This flattened and skewed representation of critical approaches, taking an argument out of its context (an academic debate) and uses it as if it were a pedagogical

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    which psychological framework to use.  I chose the critic Cynthia Wolff who uses a Freudian framework for analysis.  Wolff feels that Edna's problems are a result of oral conflicts, while I see the work as more of an allegory of existentialism, and Edna's problems are a result of a lack of Being. Cynthia Wolff draws the reader into the Freudian framework by pointing out how cyclic Edna's life is in relation to eating and sleeping.  Wolff claims, "If one were to plot the course of Edna's life during

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    Kant's Second Analogy

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    accordance with a causal law. Although there have been numerous interpretations of this argument, we have not been able to show that it is valid. In this paper, I develop my own interpretation of this argument. I borrow an insight offered by Robert Paul Wolff. In Kant's argument, our need to presuppose that the causal determination of each event rests not upon our need to impose a 'necessary' and 'irreversible' temporal order upon representations of the states of an object, as Kant is usually interpreted

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    Hegel vs. Kant

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    Le point de départ de la philosophie critique de Kant est la philosophie rationaliste de Leibniz-Wolff . Par l’influence de Hume et de Rousseau, qui, selon ses propres termes, le mit «sur le droit chemin», et provoqua chez lui une «révolution de la réflexion», Kant sort de son «sommeil dogmatique» en matière de contenus et de méthodes, et élabore sa propre méthode de réflexion philosophique. L'expression «critique transcendantale» qualifie le mieux la méthode d'investigation philosophique de Kant

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