Free Carol Gilligan Essays and Papers

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    What is Feminism?

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    the gender gap and the idea that men are superior to women decreased or even abolished. Carol Gilligan is one woman who has contributed much time and effort to the feminist theory. Her beliefs and ideas are based upon difference feminism. In this essay I will tie the ideas and beliefs of Carol Gilligan with information from our text, the packet read in class and the book, Faces of Feminism. Carol Gilligan is a lecturer and assistant professor at Harvard University as well as a psychologist. She

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    relate to instances where I have supported a belief, regardless of the criticisms that arise, all because my choice is based upon personal morals. The same can be said regarding Debra J. Dickerson as she expresses in her novel, An American Story. In Carol Gilligan’s “Concepts of Self and Morality,” she states, “The moral person is one who helps others; goodness in service, meeting one’s obligations and responsibilities to others, if possible without sacrificing oneself” (170). After considering this

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    Psychology is defined by Merriam-Webster, as the science of mind and behavior. It is a study of how an individual's psyche can be created, developed, altered or destroyed. Carol Gilligan, a Harvard Graduate School professor, for many years has analyzed the psychological theory and development, specifically in a book entitled In A Different Voice. Through years of history women have been subjugated. They are seen as vehicles for reproduction and sexual objects. Yet this is a mentality that is

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    Carol Gilligan (1982) sparked a heated academic debate with her popular book In a different Voice: Psychological Theory and Women's Development. In this book Gilligan departs from the traditional sequential stage modals advocated by luminary psychologists such as Piaget (1925) and Kohlberg (1969) and develops her own moral orientation model. Gilligan criticises these theories as she claims they are insensitive to females 'different voice' on morality and therefore result in women achieving lower

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    roles in making that decision. Foley's examples and her in-depth analysis of the Odyssey all support her thesis as I have interpreted it to be. There are, however, problems in her comparison of the Odyssey and outside texts (especially that of Carol Gilligan), inconsistencies in citations and style, and examples that either have little or nothing to do with her thesis. The largest problem with this essay that I could find is the ignorance of a few facts that could possibly be construed as being in

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    interview with Carol Gilligan” (1992), she investigates the difficulties faced by girls as they enter their early teens, including the patterns of how a girl “loses her voice and connection with others” (19, Gilligan 1992) as she ages. I wonder if there is a correlation between these girls’ lack of confidence and support with the societal pressures to be the perfect girl who “give[s] up [her] own experience [in order to] tune into the way other people want [her] to see things” (20, Gilligan 1992). Do

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    Carol Gilligan Carol Gilligan—born November 28, 1936, is a highly esteemed feminist, psychologist, and author. She graduated from Swarthmore College summa cum laude in 1958; she then went on to receive her Master’s degree in clinical psychology from Radcliffe College; during this time she also married her husband Jim Gilligan. She then made the transition into working towards her PhD in social psychology at Harvard University. She wrote her dissertation over an analysis of motives. Upon graduation

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    Breaking Bad

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    In many ways the inception of television has been a growing phenomenon in our history, cultivating many moments that changed the view of how we preserve what influences us. Television has since become so important in people’s lives showcasing films, news, shows, commercials, etc. estimating a whopping 96% universal presence in U.S. households (Croteau, 2014) one can wonder if what is shown on television is a product of the environment or the product of the viewer. This brings me to two major themes

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    t.v show

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    meticulous precision, portraying a character that is hastily rotting inside. The audience is treated to a set-up where so many things are interconnected. An example is where Fring’s laptop was confiscated by the police, loaded with incriminating material (Gilligan). When finding out how to repossess it, the series connects us to yet another of its suits: the painstaking demonstration of a plot unfolding, taking into account all mistakes, arguments and false-starts that such undertakings involve. The series

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    Walter as he changes from a compliant and empathetic father to a cold, merciless drug kingpin through the wrong decisions he makes in life. Vince Gilligan made the show with a dream of having the hero turn into the adversary as the show advances and to investigate the subject "actions have consequences." In giving Bryan Cranston a part as Walter White, Gilligan picked a performing artist whose livelihood bend dovetails uncannily with his character. As Walt changes from such a family man himself into a

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    Families in the Call to Home by Carol Stack The families in the Call to Home by Carol Stack do not fit with the normal American household described by Haviland. A normal American household includes the parents and the children only. An aunt raising her nieces and nephews with her own children while their parents are living up North is not considered a normal household. Parents and children are separated with part of the children living with one parent and the others are living with grandparents

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    The Character of Carol Kennicott in Main Street The protagonist in this story is Carol Kennicott. She is a young woman attending college in St. Paul Minnesota. She wants to go somewhere in her life. She has gone out and gotten a college education so that she won’t have to be a house wife. She has an outgoing personality and is continuously trying to change the things around her. She meets a man named William Kennicott. They fall in love and move to the small town of Gopher Prairie. While

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    Carol Ann Duffy's Revision of Masculinist Representations of Female Identity Carol Ann Duffy is one of the freshest and bravest talents to emerge in British poetry —any poetry — for years', writes Eavan Boland (Duffy, 1994, cover). This courage is manifest in Duffy’s ability and desire to revise masculinist representations of female identity and her engagement with feminine discourse, a concept which, as Sara Mills points out: has moved away from viewing women as simply an oppressed group, as

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    The Role of the Nativity in "Magi" and "Carol of the Brown King" What were the Three Wise Men searching for when they followed the North Star? They were obviously seeking the Christ child, but they were also searching for the truth and righteousness that he represents. Sylvia Plath in her poem "Magi" and Langston Hughes in his poem "Carol of the Brown King" discuss the merit of their respective minority groups through allusions to the nativity. Plath uses the journey to discuss both the ignorance

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    The Poetics of Carol Muske and Joy Harjo

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    The Poetics of Carol Muske and Joy Harjo I began a study of autobiography and memoir writing several years ago. Recently I discovered two poets who believe that recording one’s place in history is integral to their art. Carol Muske and Joy Harjo are renowned poets who explore the intricacies of self in regards to cultural and historical place. Muske specifically addresses the poetics of women poets, while Harjo addresses the poetics of minority, specifically Native American, writers. Both poets

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    ‘Valentine’ and ‘Stealing’, By Carol-Ann Duffy FOR IDEAS ONLY, DO NOT COPY In ‘Valentine’ and ‘Stealing’, Carol-Ann Duffy uses an extended metaphor which helps the reader relate to what the poet is trying to get across, and to understand what the feelings are of the narrator. Both poems also focus on the thoughts and emotions of the ‘speaker’, both are structured as conversational pieces, meaning you could just use it to talk to someone, and could imagine the reactions of the person they’re talking

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    Throughout the course of our lives we will experience the deterioration of a loved one due to illness or aging. This may cause us to make a choice of how and where we choose our loved one to die. Authors, Carolyn Jaffe and Carol H. Ehrlich, in their book All Kinds of Love, illustrate how the relationships between doctors, patients', family, friends, hospice volunteers, and hospice nurses all play an important role during he patients last days as they try to reach a "good death". In the book's foreword

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    Alfred Burt

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    Alfred Burt is most recognized for writing many Christmas carols that we love and sing today. He was born in Marquette Michigan on April 22, 1920. Early in his childhood he moved to Pontiac Michigan after his father became pastor of a church. From an early age he had shown an interest in music, and began practicing on a cornet when he received it as a gift from his parents. Soon enough he began to explore playing other instruments such as the piano and trumpet. With his musical skills, he was

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    Analysis of Carol Tavris' “In Groups We Shrink From Loner’s Heroics” “Something happens to individuals when they collect in a group. They think and act differently than they would on their own. (17)” States Carol Tavris in her article, “In Groups We Shrink From Loner’s Heroics”. Tavris believes people who are in groups tend to act in a more sluggish manor than those alone. She states many examples of this theory in her article, including the story of Kitty Genovese which is stated in the first

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    Carol Tavris' In Groups We Shrink From Loner’s Heroics “In Groups We Shrink From Loner’s Heroics” is an essay about how people in groups behave together. The author of this essay believes that when people are in groups they will do nothing to help a person in distress and that they cannot think for themselves. “In Groups We Shrink From Loner’s Heroics”, by Carol Tavris was ineffective because it used logical fallacies, overused pathos, had weak references to logos, and used inductive arguments

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