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    Thomas Carlyle

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    Thomas Carlyle Thomas Carlyle was a Scottish essayist and historian; his writings helped him to become one of a select group of sages that earned the respect of the serious minded Victorian public. His writings consisted of historical events, political and economic situations, and he also wrote books about religious and biographical topics. Thomas Carlyle was born in Ecclefechan, Annandale on December 4, 1795. His father, James Carlyle, was a profound Calvinist and was part of his early influence

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    Thomas Carlyle

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    Thomas Carlyle was born in Ecclefechan, Scotland on December 4, 1795. Thomas Carlyle had a very small family. Thomas Carlyle had a father who indeed liked to use his talents to benefit the citizens of Scotland. One of his talents was building and creating certain objects. Thomas’s father used that skill later on in his life and became a stone masonry. In this field Thomas’s father created things such as tombs, monuments and even cathedrals. His father was also a Calvinist .Thomas Carlyle had a stepmother

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    Tennyson, Browning, Arnold and Carlyle

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    Tennyson, Browning, Arnold and Carlyle Thomas Carlyle writes in Characteristics that, "The healthy know not of their health, but only the sick"(923). He extends this medical/biological aphorism to the social and ideological world of Victorian England. Carlyle thoroughly goes over the question, What is the state of England? He finds that England is in a state of transition, and while the old is no longer useful to the society, the new has not yet been clearly defined. This void contributes to

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    sacrifice of self-interest and personal development. Queen Victoria did little to promote the advancement of women during this time. There were however influential Victorian English writers, for example, John Stuart Mill, Lord Tennyson and Thomas Carlyle, who acknowledged the plight of women and wrote in order to promote awareness and to perhaps initiate reform. Of the three aforementioned writers, Mill is the most vocal on the subject of equality for women. In 1869 John Stuart Mill wrote The Subjection

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    Britain were clearly reflected in the pamphlets, essays, lectures, and books of Carlyle, the greatest figure in the general prose literature of his age and one of the greatest moral forces of the nineteenth century. Thomas Carlyle (1795-1886), Scottish historian, critic, and sociological writer was born in the village of Ecclefechan, Dumfriesshire as the eldest child of James Carlyle, stonemason, and Margaret Carlyle. The two great influences on his thought and work were the Bible and the modern

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    change came prosperity, wealth, and support. However, along with the good came the negative. The negative was the people who were traditional. They did not want change because they liked their world the way it was. One of these people was Thomas Carlyle. He was tremendously pessimistic towards the change of the nineteenth century and he wrote an essay titled The "Mechanical Age" explaining why. His former friend, a supporter of change, John Stuart Mill also wrote a paper. Mill's paper was aptly

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    theologian Carlyle, "comes thy strength."[1] I believe Carlyle is describing one of two kinds of silence. On one side, silence can be negative and harmful. This is the silence of oppression, a controlling force which leaves victims voiceless and the needy helpless. This is not what Carlyle means by his silence. He is invoking a different force. His silence has agency; it is the silence of resistance, of overcoming, and of strength. Today I will examine the sophisticated silence of which Carlyle writes

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    A Tale of Two Cities- A Historical fiction

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    as well as the events, which occurred during the revolution. Dickens may not have been totally accurate with his historical information, but he vividly portrays the atmosphere of England and France during this period. The French Revolution, by Carlyle, was the main source of Dickens’ information for his novel with the two settings, London and Paris. Adopting Carlyle’s philosophy of history, Dickens created A Tale of Two Cities with a tightly structured plot, developed through a series of amazingly

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    the narration of the historical episodes (Lodge 134; Friedman 489). And yet, Dickens's outlook on revolutionary violence differed significantly from that of Carlyle. As Irene Collins points out, Dickens "dislikes the violence of the revolutionaries, both in its popular form (the mob) and in its institutionalised form (the Terror). Unlike Carlyle, he can no longer see justice in the violence" (53). Moreover, it is Dickens's novel, rather than Carlyle's history, which is responsible for the popular image

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    Victorian Thinkers: The Victorian Sage

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    Matthew Arnold, Thomas Carlyle, John Ruskin and William Thackeray are among the Victorian thinkers to earn the title of “sage.” To some degree, the Victorian sages were respected and enjoyed by people from all social classes. They were certainly considered intellectuals and trailblazers of alternative viewpoints. They passed their message through public speaking, periodic columns in newspapers, poetry, and in novel-form. It is a difficult task to describe them as a group because they were each so

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