Free Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission Essays and Papers

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Free Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission Essays and Papers

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    Canada Under American Dominion

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    The dawn of the 1970s brought forth a great change in the Canadian attitude towards economic relations with the United States. The oscillation of the Canadian economy, due to the Nixon Shock of 1971, greatly contributed to the rise of Canadian awareness regarding foreign investment; particularly increased trade dependence with the United States. As this awareness gradually began to present itself as paranoia, pressures fell on the government to pursue more nationalistic policies and mandates, which

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    Policy Problem The recent Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications (CRTC) (2013c) 'Broadcasting Regulatory Policy on the Distribution of Canadian Category C national news speciality services' marks a new regulatory approach to distributing competitive news and sports programming in Canada. This policy is a response to Canadians' concerns over consumer choice due to program bundling and an inability to select news and sports programs on a stand-alone basis (CRTC, 2013c; CRTC, 2014). Based

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    nigger

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    Race Canada, Rookie Blue and Saving Hope are the three most watched Canadian television series in 2013 (Bell Media, 2013). These as well as many other Canadian series can largely contribute their success to the government of Canada’s implementation of Canadian content regulations. These regulations primarily came in the forum of the Broadcasting Act. The regulations have since been seen as the primary driving force of the Canadian film and video production industry. As they ensure the productions

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    American Influence Promotes Canadian Identity

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    From the start of the 1920's, Canadians have faced a considerable amount of threat towards the Canadian culture from it's American neighbours. For Canada, living so close causes a concern on Canadian identity from American implementation, however, being in a close relationship with the States, it has also promoted Canadian culture. An examination of the nation's success with CBC from America's involvement in the airwaves, Canadian nationalism is promoted through Hockey Night in Canada and the establishment

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    CanCon Regulations toward a Better Canada

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    media to encourage a more “Canadian” youth. Canadian television, films, and radio alike are often compared to that of American media, which contains highly identifiably American substance. Thus, Canadian identity and culture is greatly influenced by content derived from the USA. Otherwise, Canada has rich and diverse culture with its own economic systems, political ideologies and processes, ways of life and social mores (StatsCan, 2013). Therefore, it is up to Canadian regulations to motivate its

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    born and raised Canadian, I do not see many dissimilarities between the American and Canadian cultures. This may be a direct result of American pop-culture (television, books, and magazines) making its way to Canadian citizens. Now studying this case, I feel rather guilty for not taking responsibility of researching and learning more about my Canadian culture, and just adopting what I’ve been exposed to over the last several years. I now understand the motives behind the U.S.-Canadian magazine dispute

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    Mitchell likens computers as media to a frontier society (Crowley 303). New media technologies beckon more enticingly than ever. More than merely offering an improvement on existing forms of communication, new media technologies are creating what telecommunications scholar Frederick Williams calls a “virtually new medium of public communication” (Pavlik, 79). The Internet is a form of new media. Exploiting the Internet’s distribution channels will be an important challenge to publishing and other media

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    Mashall McLuhans impact

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    Marshall McLuhan and Harold Innis are two of the most influential philosophers in communication studies. While Innis took part in the “rise and fall” aspect of the media and it’s impact on society, McLuhan focused on electronic media and global village aspects of the matter. Today, I would like to discuss the impact that Marshall McLuhan has had on the world of information technology and his contributions today’s progression in media. When it comes down to media in Canada, we have learned that there

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    Canadian television has long been an underappreciated and underestimated culture medium, which has yet to make an impact on the Canadian cultural identity. It’s not that Canadian’s disregard television as a means of entertainment; but rather that many Canadian’s have ignored the domestic content on their television screens. This can be attributed to Canadian television’s “reputation for being both cheap, and cheap looking.” (Houpt, 2014); as the industry has often created dramas and reality television

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    Is Canadian Culture Doomed to Become American? As Alvin Toffler once said, “The wider any culture is spread, the thinner it gets”1. Such holds true for the American culture, which is not only a dominating factor in its own internal market and known domestically but also a dictating force in countries around the world on the global scale, and the first on their list – Canada. This issue of cultural imperialism is touched upon by Gaëtan Tremblay in his article, “Is Quebec Culture Doomed to Become

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