Free Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Essays and Papers

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    Introduction In the early 1930’s, the inception of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) came about in response to overwhelming American broadcasting and a concern that Canada would be dominated by U.S culture (Manera, T., 2015, The CBC: Past, Present, and Future, paras. 2-3). The CBC is different from other broadcasters in that it is publicly funded and as a result must aim to be reflective of all Canadians and be representative of both languages. In addition to this mandate, the

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    Many people argue whether not Canada has any culture at all, and why American culture seems to have such a big influence on Canadian music, art and television. Over the years the Canadian government has tried to protect and develop talent in Canada. Once British traditions started to fade away, the influence on Canada from America became stronger. If Canada was to become a strong independent country they needed their own identity. The government support has played an important role in the arts development

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    nigger

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    Race Canada, Rookie Blue and Saving Hope are the three most watched Canadian television series in 2013 (Bell Media, 2013). These as well as many other Canadian series can largely contribute their success to the government of Canada’s implementation of Canadian content regulations. These regulations primarily came in the forum of the Broadcasting Act. The regulations have since been seen as the primary driving force of the Canadian film and video production industry. As they ensure the productions

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    American Influence Promotes Canadian Identity

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    From the start of the 1920's, Canadians have faced a considerable amount of threat towards the Canadian culture from it's American neighbours. For Canada, living so close causes a concern on Canadian identity from American implementation, however, being in a close relationship with the States, it has also promoted Canadian culture. An examination of the nation's success with CBC from America's involvement in the airwaves, Canadian nationalism is promoted through Hockey Night in Canada and the establishment

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    characterize itself as more ?Canadian? for decades. This has included numerous struggles and events such as protests, bans, and the creation of the Massey Commission, to encourage national development in the arts, and support major companies like the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) and National Film Board (NFB). However, this has not been an easy task for the Canadian government, as major influences from below the border (the United States) have been captivating the Canadian audiences by large. American

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    Identity and Culture

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    strive. History and the changes made to history are two of the main things that could create the identity and culture of a country. The Canadian Film Industry, which may further be expanded to the media industry, is a fantastic example of how the history of something in a country can shape and influence the identity and culture of the country. The history of the Canadian Film Industry allows us insight as to how the identity and culture of Canada were created. The first introduction of film into Canada

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    Policy Problem The recent Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications (CRTC) (2013c) 'Broadcasting Regulatory Policy on the Distribution of Canadian Category C national news speciality services' marks a new regulatory approach to distributing competitive news and sports programming in Canada. This policy is a response to Canadians' concerns over consumer choice due to program bundling and an inability to select news and sports programs on a stand-alone basis (CRTC, 2013c; CRTC, 2014). Based

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    foundations would have to be questioned. Such a time came in 1942 when 23,000 Japanese Canadians were interned; over 75% of them were Canadian citizens (Hickman, 72). Unnecessary fear had found shelter in the hearts of the British majority which resided in Canada at the time (ibid). It spread from heart to heart; fuelled by racism it ran rampant. Dislike turned to hatred, Canadians became a threat to other Canadians, and people of Japanese origin became enemy aliens or better known as Japs (Aihoshi

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    Public Broadcast and Democracy

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    “Constructing Canada: Do we need a public broadcaster to enhance democracy?” written by David Taras, a professor at the University of Calgary and director of Alberta Global Forum. Taras reinstates the turning point of Canada Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) and their relationship with the Canadian parliament. He addressed on the developments and struggles Public Service Broadcasters (PSB), specifically CBC, encounter in order to continue to telecast. Lastly, he explains that PSB has a major role in maintaining

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    of how this kind of thinking can work. Canadian culture is, at its core, incredibly nationalist. Canadians have an irrational fear of cultural dilution at the hands of America's exported entertainment, news, and world politics. Given the fear and righteous self-view of the dominant culture, it is an inevitability that co-cultures separated from the dominant culture by national identity are treated as sub-cultures. My mother, Molly Galloway, is a Canadian. She grew up in what would also be my hometown

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