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    Campaign Finance Reform

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    is not brought up in dinner parties. The subject of campaign finance reform sounds so dull, but it is necessary to understand that reform helps to keep the society flowing smoothly. Therefore, what is the current status of campaign finance reform? In 2002 the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act was passed by Congress. It was also known as the McCain-Feingold Act (Sidlow, 2013, p.213). It banned soft money at federal levels and regulated campaign ads from interest groups because the enormous amount

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    Madness is finishing something again and again, however, needing an alternate consequence. That really well depicts campaign fund change in America. The more awful the framework gets, the more the U.S. manages it. The more America directs it, the more regrettable it gets. Everything began in 1974, when Congress capped campaign contribution limits and spending. Reason for the cap was that more diminutive gifts and less spending might decrease the ruining impact of cash. A less clear motivation, obviously

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    Campaign Finance Reform

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    Campaign Finance Reform The politics is a stage for many different characters of whom each is trying to convince their audience to give them the loudest cheer and the grand applause. Politicians who played the acts will do their best and sometimes will do everything to win the hearts of their audience and that means to win at all cost. Politics involves money for it is the way to make campaign possible that is why there are campaign managers and campaign funds to whoever will run for any office

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    and spend within a campaign. In order to enforce fairness between candidates, Congress created the Federal Election Committee (FEC), making the government the superior source of funds for Presidential elections. The FEC restricts the amount of money an individual can donate to a candidate and the amount that can be indirectly contributed. Some would object to these limits because they feel that government money could be better spent on other issues rather then on the campaign and supporters should

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    Campaign Finance Reform has become an increasingly discussed topic due to the events that have occurred throughout the 2016 election thus far. Democratic Presidential Candidate Bernie Sanders and Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump have both used the Campaign Finance Reform (CFR) debate as a means to garner additional support from people who feel that “big money” i.e. corporations and the super wealthy, have influenced politics for far too long. “Big money” in politics is an issue that

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    In a country where democracy is at the heart of all citizens, these citizens need to have a stronger voice when it comes to elections. This is why the implementation of an amendment that reforms the financing of campaigns is disputed greatly among scholars and political officials alike. The Supreme Court has ruled that corporations are entitled to first amendment rights, but the basis of this ruling is unclear. Unfortunately the overturning of such a ruling would not even guarantee a restored democracy

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    Campaign Finance Reform

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    Campaign Finance Reform The Democratic and Republican presidential nominees for 1999 raised an astounding 126 million to finance their campaigns in the primaries (Godfrey). The U.S. national political parties raised a record 107.2 million dollars in soft money contributions in 1999 (Campaign Finance Reform). During the 1995-96 elections, public citizens estimated that an astounding 150 million dollars was spent on "phony" issue ads designed to support or oppose congressional and presidential

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    Campaign Finance Reform

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    Campaign Finance Reform With the introduction of “soft” money in politics, elections no longer go to the best candidate, but simply to the richer one. Soft money is defined as unregulated money that is given to the political parties that ends up being used by candidates in an election. In last year’s elections, the Republican and Democratic parties raised more than one-half of a billion dollars in soft money. Current politicians are pushing the envelope farther than any previous administrations

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    Campaign Finance Reform

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    Campaign finance reform has a broad history in America. In particular, campaign finance has developed extensively in the past forty years, as the courts have attempted to create federal elections that best sustain the ideals of a representative democracy. In the most recent Supreme Court decision concerning campaign finance, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, the Court essentially decided to treat corporations like individuals by allowing corporations to spend money on federal elections

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    Campaign Finance Reform and the Necessity of Democracy One of the major notions of the American system of government is that it is a government by the people, for the people. The system is supposed to take into account the opinions and desires off all those who fall under its jurisdiction. This is said to be accomplished by a representative democracy, where citizens elect one of there own to speak for the group (Hastings, 04). Therefore, it is reasonable to infer that any eligible man or

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