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    Elizabeth Cady Stanton

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    Elizabeth Cady Stanton Elizabeth Cady Stanton was known as the "Daughter of the Revolution," which dealt with women's suffrage (Ward 92). Stanton was born on November 12, 1815, to Daniel Cady and Margaret Livingston. Daniel, her father, held the position of judge of Johnstown, New York. Unfortunately for Daniel, Margaret gave birth to only three sons, two whom died shortly after; one at birth and the other after graduating from Union College . Stanton engaged herself in Greek studies and mathematics

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    Elizabeth Cady Stanton

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    Elizabeth Cady Stanton I was once called the most dangerous woman in America because I dared to ask for the unthinkable- the right to vote. I challenged my culture's basic assumptions about men and women, and dedicated my life to the pursuit of equal rights for all women. My name is Elizabeth Cady Stanton. I was born in Johnstown, New York, on the 12th of November, 1815. My father is the prominent attorney and judge Daniel Cady and my mother is Margaret Livingston Cady. I was born the seventh child

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    Elizabeth Cady Stanton

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    of the rights they have today to Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s relentless efforts and life-long work and advocating for Women’s Rights. Stanton wasn’t only a suffragist, she also strived for women to get women to be able to divorce their husbands. She wanted women to try to keep themselves from getting pregnant. She wanted women to have "sexual freedom" and be able to marry whoever they choose, regardless of race. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was born Elizabeth Cady on November 12, 1815 in Johnstown New York

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    Political Romantics of Elizabeth Cady Stanton Romantic persuasion enters all genres of literature. At the time of the American Renaissance romanticism became a prominent aspect of writing. It was a time of change not just in literature, but in the political arena. The political turmoil of the time created a new venue for writers with views of a utopian society. These author's, with their ideals, became a catalyst for the continuing changes of today. This cunning use of language, whether intentional

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    Elizabeth Cady Stanton was born in November 12, 1815, in Johnstown, New York. Her parents were Margaret Livingston and Daniel Cady, who were important citizens. Daniel Cady, in particular, was notable for being a lawyer, state assemblyman, and congressman, who supported his daughter’s education. Unlike many women of her time, she went to primary school at the Johnstown Academy and attended Emma Willard’s Troy Female Seminary, an all girl’s boarding school that taught grades 9-12. In addition, she

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    Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Women's Rights Movement Elizabeth Cady Stanton was born November 12, 1815, in Johnstown, New York. She was the fourth of six children. Later she would meet and marry Henry B. Stanton, a prominent abolitionist. Together they would have seven children. Although Elizabeth never went to college she was very learned in Greek and mathematics. During her life, Elizabeth was a very important person to the women's rights movement. This paper will present to you the

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    Elizabeth Cady Stanton, leader in the woman’s rights movement, was born on November 12, 1815 in Johnstown, New York. She is the daughter of Daniel and Mary Cady and married her husband Henry Stanton in May 1, 1840. Elizabeth Stanton and her husband had seven children. When she was 15 in 1830, being a woman, you were not allowed to do many things like attend men’s colleges, pursue certain occupations, were denied the right to vote, and to hold public office. According to Andrea Cooper, “Once you marry

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    negative. "Hardship often prepares an ordinary person for an extraordinary destiny" C.S. Lewis. Elizabeth Cady Stanton influenced her time for the better, her work towards women’s rights allowed her to become known as an extraordinary women’s rights leader. She, along with many other female leaders, began the Women’s Rights Convention, the initial workings to join women together under their cause. Cady Stanton was heavily involved in the Women’s Rights Movement, informing women of the needed equality

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    really matter. You should fight and stand up for what you believe in, what you have determine as foundation principles of your life and never give up whenever it gets tougher. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was born on November 12, 1815 in Johnstown, New York. She was the middle daughter of Daniel Cady and Margaret Livingston Cady, a prominent couple in Johnstown. Elizabeth was one of the 11 children but five of her brother and one sister died in an early age. Stanton was raised by her parents as a substitute

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    Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Women's Rights Movement Elizabeth Cady Stanton was an important element of the Women’s Rights Movement, but not many people know of her significance or contributions because she has been overshadowed by her long time associate and friend, Susan B. Anthony. However, I feel that she was a woman of great importance who was the driving force behind the 1848 Convention, played a leadership role in the women’s rights movement for the next fifty years, and in the words

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