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Free Buddhist meditation Essays and Papers

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    Buddhist Meditation

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    Meditation is very difficult to describe and can only truly be explained once experienced. It is the practice of mental concentration leading ultimately through a sequence of stages to the final goal of spiritual freedom, nirvana. The purpose of Buddhist meditation is to free ourselves from the delusion and thereby put an end to both ignorance and craving. The Buddhists describe the culminating trance-like state as transient; final Nirvana requires the insight of wisdom. The exercises that are meant

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    A very important aspect of buddhist life is meditation. Meditation is a means of transforming the mind. Buddhist meditation practices are techniques that encourage and develop concentration, clarity, emotional positivity, and a calm seeing of the true nature of things. By engaging with a particular meditation practice you learn the patterns and habits of your mind, and the practice offers a means to cultivate new, more positive ways of being. With regular work and patience these nourishing, focused

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    small talk”(Galanti) but in this case it is respectful to the patients care. (Keown) Space The space in which a patient from the Buddhist culture occupies should be a very peaceful and calm environment with family surrounding them to have the most serene death as possible. As I stated in the paragraph above, Meditation and scriptures are very important in the Buddhist culture and having an unclouded mind. Prayers can be recited for multiple years leading up to a person death and once it comes to

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    lead me to the theme of tolerance. I gained a whole sense of respect for particular people that I found no immediate resemblance for. I stand a few weeks away from the end of the course and my classmates and I were given the opportunity to visit the Buddhist Mind Monastery as our service learning project. After getting back into the car at 3:00 pm, with a sweaty forehead and a look back at the monastery, I could not help but reflect

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    and out. Try to ignore all the worries of the world around you. By doing these simple tasks, one has practiced Buddhist meditation. The word meditation can mean many different things to certain people. For some people meditation means simply a calming of the mind, creating a peaceful state of being. It can act like a vacation or escape from the reality around us. For other people meditation can mean an extraordinary experience of some alternate state of reality creating magical states of awareness

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    Buddhist Meditation Essay

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    our minds have the power of relieving it. Buddhist meditation is the practice of transforming the mind through the cultivation of mindfulness, concentration, detachment, insight, and objectivity. My background in psychology made me interested in discussing the concept of Buddhist mediation due its immense focus on mastering the mind. It has the crucial transformative effect on the mind that leads to new perspectives of oneself,

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    Shenxiu taught that meditation could clarify the mind in the direction of sudden enlightenment, which became the fulcrum of daily meditation practice. Historically, the conflict between the disciples of Hongren in the Eastern Mountain School began to show distinctions in the perception of meditation through Shenhui’s criticisms of this form of mediation as a “gradual” form of enlightenment. In The Platform Sutra, the symbolic use of a “lamp” describes the vehicle of meditation as a way to achieve

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    Thich Nhat Hanh and Buddism

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    parents to enter the monastery in Vietnam. He received training in both Zen and Mahayana. He was named editor-in-chief of Vietnamese Buddhism in 1956. In the following years, he founded the school of Youth for Social Service, a neutral Corps of Buddhist Peace workers who went into rural areas to establish a school to built a healthcare clinics and help re-build villages. Vietnam War In 1960, Nhat hanh came to the U.S. to study comparative religion at Princeton University and a following year

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    another. While comparing Buddhist meditation and Catholic prayer by identifying what

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    Meditation

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    Meditation is an age-old practice that has renewed itself in many different cultures and times. Despite its age, however, there remains a mystery and some ambiguity as to what it is, or even how one performs it. The practice and tradition of meditation dates back thousands of years having appeared in many eastern traditions. Meditation’s ancient roots cloud its origins from being attributed to a sole inventor or religion, though Bon, Hindu, Shinto, Dao, and later, Buddhism are responsible for

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