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    Brain Death

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    declaring what is and what is not brain death. In today’s society, many people, including medical professionals, judges and attorneys struggle to identify what exactly constitutes as brain death. According to, Smith“ the concept of brain death came about during the 1950’s when, as a consequence of developments in critical care, clinicians were faced for the first time with the prospect of an apparently ‘alive’ patient sustained by mechanical ventilation long after brain function had ceased”(Smith, 2011)

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    The Definition of Brain Death Guadalupe Monroy Ms. Taiya & Ms. Reed March 3, 2014 Brain Death The concept of brain death is not something that can be easily determined at just a glance. It is an intricate course of tests and time to determine if the process of brain function is evident. An important series of questions to ask yourself is, “what constitutes brain death,” “how is it defined, “and “what happens afterwards?” Brain death is not to be confused with a coma because they are entirely

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    The brain has many different parts to it which help one function through daily life; parts such as the cerebrum which controls voluntary movement and regulates functions such as thinking, speaking and the ability to recall information. The cerebellum controls the balance and coordination and finally the brain stem, which consists of the medulla oblongata and the spinal cord which controls all involuntary functions such as breathing, heart rate and blood pressure. The brain stem is also able to carry

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    What is brain dead? Everyone will always say that it’s a person whose brain is no longer functioning right? That’s not always the case though, even after brain death, a person’s heart still may continue at a very slow steady beat. Many misunderstandings and different stories make it easy to understand why there is still a good deal of controversy about the relationship between determining death and organ donation. When your heart stops, it is normally involved with cardiac arrest. In cardiac arrest

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    Brain Death in Organ Donations

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    concerning brain death within organ donations. This means whether the person is actually alive or dead when the doctors decide to harvest the organs. Some people and even organizations argue why it is they believe an individual is alive during the process while others argue why the donor isn’t alive. This essay shows the different positions of people and organizations regarding brain death. Dr. Paul A. Byrne, a neonatologist and a Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, claims that brain death is not true

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    Euthanasia of Brain Death Patients: Is it Ethical? Euthanasia is a huge ethical dilemma within healthcare today. Many times it is unethical to euthanize a human being. However, I want to discuss the case of brain dead patients. Is it ethical to euthanize a person that no longer has a chance to live the life the used to have or even the chance to wake up ever again? Euthanasia should be ethically acceptable in a case where the person is diagnosed with brain death because it prevents the patient

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    Of all the deaths that transpires in the United States, one to two percent of them are initiated by brain death ("Organ Donation and Brain Death”). That would mean that approximately 6,411,258 people perish from brain related incidents. For many years, brain death has been a controversial topic in the medical field. No one person wants to have the daunting task of telling a family their loved one will not subsist. In most cases, the patient does not survive. However, the person’s circumstance depends

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    Death in Emily Dickinson's "Because I Could Not Stop for Death," "I Heard A Fly Buzz-When I Died," and "I Felt A Funeral In My Brain" Emily Dickinson's poems "Because I Could Not Stop for Death", "I Heard A Fly Buzz-When I Died", and "I Felt A Funeral In My Brain" all deal with one of life's few certainties, death. Dickinson's intense curiosity towards mortality was present in much of her work, and is her legacy as a poet. "Because I could Not Stop for Death" is one of Emily Dickinson's

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    Introduction: At least, 2.4 million traumatic brain injury (TBI) related hospital visit each year in USA and WHO predicting that TBI will be the third leading cause of death and disability worldwide by 2020 (Hyder, Wunderlich et al. 2007, Centers for Disease and Prevention 2013). Approximately one percent Americans older than 60 years old are diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease (PD)(Gazewood, Richards et al. 2013). Millions of them have to adapt to the extensive long-term disability, but its impact

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    The story “To Build A Fire” written by Jack London has two nearly identical versions published in 1902 and 1908 respectively. The latter is better-known and more thought-provoking because of the antagonist’s death. To begin with, the adventure took place on an extremely cold day in Klondike, consisted of a man and his dog. The man was not afraid of cold and felt confident about travelling alone at fifty degrees below zero. However, he broke through a thin skin of ice unexpectedly and wet himself

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