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    birth control

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    about it then many unplanned pregnancies can result. What most people don’t consider is if young teenage girls are even close to being mature enough to be using birth control. Teenagers should be allowed to get birth control but with parents consent: it stops many unwanted pregnancies and teens need to be well informed about birth controls. Teenagers- Each year about 750,000 teenage girls get pregnant. Most would actually admit that they were not ready for sex and wish they had waited longer ( Seventeen)

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    Birth Control

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    Birth Control A. Condom 1. Description 2. How does it work? 3. How effective? 4. Where available? 5. Advantages/disadvantages of use. 6. Your opinion B. Diaphragm 1. Description 2. How does it work? 3. How effective? 4. Where available? 5. Advantages/disadvantages of use. 6. Your opinion C. Tubal Ligation 1. Description 2. How does it work? 3. How effective? 4. Where available? 5. Advantages/disadvantages of use. 6. Your opinion D. Vasectomy 1. Description 2. Where available

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    Birth Control

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    for Disease Control conducted a study on contraceptive use; their findings concluded “four out of five women have used birth control pills” during one point of their lives (Basset). Birth control pills have been around for over six decades, and their popularity has significantly increased during the past decade. Thousands of sexually-active women are turning to birth control pills as a way to prevent unplanned pregnancy, regulate periods, and to control acne. Nonetheless, birth control pills are synthetic

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    Birth Control

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    Birth Control Birth Control is defined as various ways used to prevent pregnancy from occurring. Birth Control has been a concern for humans for thousands of years. The first contraception devices were mechanical barriers in the vagina that prevented the male sperm from fertilizing the female egg. Other methods of birth control that were used in the vagina were sea sponges, mixtures of crocodile dung and honey, quinine, rock salt and alum. Birth Control was of interest for a long time, but women

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    To Control or to Not Control: The Government and Birth Control Health care and what people are legally allowed to do with their bodies have created controversy galore throughout history. A particular point of debate is the topic of birth control and the government. A dangerous couple, it raises the question of who should have control over contraceptive laws and what controls involving them should be put in place? Currently, under the Obama Administration, the Affordable Care Act and “Obamacare” have

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    What Is Birth Control?

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    forms of birth control. Birth control is any method used to prevent pregnancy. Some of the methods used are condoms, IUDs, birth control pills, pull-out method, vasectomy, and tubal ligation. With so many methods of birth control available and so many factors to consider, choosing one can be difficult. It can be difficult because every type of birth control has some kind of side effects. Without doing the research on her own how would she know the side effects that comes with the birth control. It shouldn’t

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    unregulated policies, the most prominent of these, the birth control movement. The documents from chapter six of Constructing the American Past show that at its core, the birth control debate was a multifaceted social dispute with, religious political and racial influences. Margaret Sanger’s monthly publication The Woman Rebel released its first issue in 1914, creating a nationwide dispute concerning the publication and distribution of birth control devices. However, Sanger’s initial goal went beyond

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    Male Birth Control

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    both sexes responsibility to practice “safe sex”. Introducing the birth control pill for women in the 1960s created a huge controversy between sexual conservatives and the women who would benefit from the pill, but the responsibility still remained in the hands of women. However, as medicine has advanced and the possibility of a male birth control pill has amounted, many wonder if the same issues would arise if a male birth control pill did in fact become available. In order to understand the effects

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    Birth Control

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    The practice of birth control prevents conception, thus limiting reproduction. The term birth control, coined by Margaret SANGER in 1914, usually refers specifically to methods of contraception, including STERILIZATION. The terms family planning and planned parenthood have a broader application. METHODS OF BIRTH CONTROL Attempts to control fertility have been going on for thousands of years. References to preventing conception are found in the writings of priests, philosophers, and physicians

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    The Birth Control Pill

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    The birth control pill, or the oral contraceptive, has been used since the 20th century as an effective form of preventing unwanted pregnancy in women. Even though “the pill” is beneficial in more ways than just preventing pregnancy, there is still a stigma towards women who use oral contraceptives that they should be shamed and characterized as promiscuous beings. Contrary to popular belief, birth control can prevent cancerous tumors from developing, can regulate hormone levels, and can, of course

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