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    Reasons why Wolves Tend to Live in Packs

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    The largest member of the canine family is the wolf, the ancestor of almost all dogs known today. The males can get up to 95-99 lbs. and the females can get up to 79-85 lbs. Wolves tend to live together in groups called packs, a group of animals living and hunting together, a pack on average consists of 5-11 wolves at a time. There are 1-2 adults, 3-6 juveniles, and 1-3 yearlings, and sometimes you will find one or more families grouping together to make a bigger pack. Wolves are very territorial

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    Introduction: Competition is a mutually undesirable interaction, be it within the same or different species. It is a major ecological force and transpires naturally amongst sympatric organisms and arises due to a scarcity in resources that organisms need in order to subsist and reproduce (Miller 1995, Cartar et al. 2014). It is this scarcity of resources that ultimately becomes a selective factor that dictates the survival of a species. Conversely, a surplus of resources affords an opposite effect-

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    There are several interactions that happen between species. They include competition, mutualism, predation, parasitism, and disease. Each one of these can affect organisms either in a positive or negative way. These are all important for organisms to evolve and become the best fit of their species. Without these interactions species would never change and would die out very easily when faced with tough environments. Competition is always over the supply of a limited resource. There are two types

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    Competition

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    INTRODUCTION: Competition occurs between any organisms living in a mutual habitat. Whether it is for food, water, shelter, or a mate, competition can be harmful or helpful to each organism. There are two basic types of competition; intraspecific and interspecific. These terms refer to competition within a specific species and the competition between different species, respectively. In this lab, we conducted 3 basic experiments. Our goal was to observe the effects of the competition in each instance

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    Interactions between organisms are called a biological interaction. Within these interactions, there are positive but also negative interactions that can be beneficial to some, harmful to the other and even neutral for the organism. The interaction between organisms can be break down to three big categories and amongst those categories, it can be break down to small subcategories. First major relationship between organism that is most common and what defines the law of nature is prey-predator relationship

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    Genetics: The Concept of Epistasis

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    In fact, genes interact with each other. Epistasis is a phenomenon based on the concept of gene interaction whereby, the effect of a specific gene on the phenotype of an individual is either masked or reinforced by one or more different genes (Natural Standard, 2013). It is important to underline that epistasis involves the interaction between different genes and that the result of this interaction is related to the susceptibility to various human diseases (Nagel 2005). An example of such human

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    Biological Teleology in Contemporary Science

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    Biological Teleology in Contemporary Science Continuous controversies about how Aristotle's teleological biology relates to modern biological science address some widely debated questions in contemporary philosophy of science. Three main groups of objections made by contemporary science against Aristotle's biology can be identified: 1) Aristotle's biological teleology is too anthropomorphic; 2) the idea is tied too substance based; 3) Aristotle's final ends contradict the mechanistic spirit of

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    Morality's Biological Nature

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    Morality's Biological Nature: Implications for the Attribution of "Good" and "Evil". "A man who has no assured and ever present belief in the existence of a personal God or of a future existence with retribution and reward, can have for his rule of life, as far as I can see, only to follow those impulses and instincts which are the strongest or which seem to him the best ones. . . . If he acts for the good of others, he will receive the approbation of his fellow men and gain the love of those

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    Metaphor, Sociobiology, and Nature vs. Nurture: The Biological Battle of the Century Ladies and Gentlemen! I am proud to present one of the biggest and longest-running biological battles of the century! Tonight we recap the surprising nature vs. nurture fight. The following pages will explain the highlights, but if you want to learn about this war in its entirety, you’ll find the blow-by-blow account available to the public in Connie Barlow’s collection, From Gaia to Selfish Genes, in a chapter

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    A Biological Look at Suicide

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    Efficiency Above All: A Biological Look at Suicide "And let me ask you this; the dead, where aren't they?" – Franz Wright, New Yorker Magazine, Oct. 6, 2003 "Dear Mom and Dad," the letter begins benignly, "Thank you for all of your commitment. But I am not a suitable daughter, and you will all be better off without me. Please realize I have done this for your own good." Nothing more. And beside it, Mr. and Mrs. A find their daughter, dead by her own hand. So begin the episodes of anguished

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