Biblical Exegesis

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  • Biblical Exegesis

    1094 Words  | 5 Pages

    Biblical Exegesis First I will give you a background of exegesis. Webster's New World Dictionary(1990), defines exegesis as, the interpretation of a word, passage, etc., esp. in the Bible. This definition is a worldly. To understand the true meaning and background I looked in John H. Hays book called, Biblical Exegesis, for the answer. He says that the term "exegesis" itself comes from the Greek word exegeomai which basically meant " to lead out of." When applied to texts, it denoted

  • Biblical Exegesis

    1435 Words  | 6 Pages

    First I will give you a background of exegesis. Webster's New World Dictionary(1990), defines exegesis as, the interpretation of a word, passage, etc., esp. in the Bible. This definition is a worldly. To understand the true meaning and background I looked in John H. Hays book called, Biblical Exegesis, for the answer. He says that the term "exegesis" itself comes from the Greek word exegeomai which basically meant " to lead out of." When applied to texts, it denoted the "

  • Biblical Exegesis of Psalm 89

    1476 Words  | 6 Pages

    The Hebrew Bible, better known as the Old Testament, is a collection of tomes that form part of the Biblical canon. Many scholars around the world do not think that a single author wrote the books contained in the Hebrew Bible, but rather that it represents centuries of stories frequently compiled after the events they describe . The stories were created with visions for the future, in order to allow audiences insight into communities and beliefs that were common thought during their era. The stories

  • Orthodoxy And Orthopraxy Essay

    1340 Words  | 6 Pages

    lives. This confusion gives rise to a fresh look at biblical exegesis and its relationship to orthodoxy, and orthopraxy. With the rise of contemporary thinking within the church, researchers can look at this dynamic, with the hopes of producing useful results to answer these questions. In order for researchers to assure accuracy in interpreting their results, they must consider the relationship of orthodoxy and orthopraxy with biblical exegesis, contemplate diminishing their personal biases concerning

  • The Bible and Understanding Scripture

    812 Words  | 4 Pages

    will unfold all the messages throughout the Bible. A reader of the Bible can pertinently understand the words of scripture; once the foundation of interpretation and forms of the different types of literature are understood with a solid form of biblical translation available. Correct interpretation of the Bible is of extreme importance to understand the Bible. When a person reads the Bible they begin to internally interpret the Bible. Interpreting the Bible independently is not an issue, but allowing

  • The Concept Of Intertextuality

    1026 Words  | 5 Pages

    what is said in the biblical text. The triune communicative action continues through the subsequent work of the Spirit in the church over time and space. Similarly, Seitz also maintains a Trinitarian understanding of divine discourse. He says, “As the Son and the Father are one, so, too, is the witness to them from the Old and New Testaments, which witness is perceived by eyes of faith through the work of the Holy Spirit.”101 Intertextuality One of the burgeoning areas in biblical interpretation is

  • How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth

    2579 Words  | 11 Pages

    who want to learn more about what the Bible has to offer. The authors present distinct principles for interpreting different genres found in the Bible. The book has sold over a half a million copies and is one of the most popular books regarding biblical interpretation. Fee is a seminary professor of New Testament studies at Regent College. He has authored several New Testament commentaries and is the general editor of the New International Commentary series. Fee has also contributed significantly

  • Henri De Lubac: Christian Theology

    789 Words  | 4 Pages

    research in this area had lead into de Lubac furthering his studies in the medieval exegesis; as well as, his study in ecclesiology. Some of de Lubac’s work and publishing’s had lead him in troubling situations, in particular his work on the idea of ‘supernatural’ and his publication ‘Surnaturel’. De Lubac’s study and writings of ecclesiology have influenced the Second Vatican Council, and his writings on medieval exegesis helped him regain his acceptance into Christian society. Henri de Lubac’s perspective

  • The Teaching Ministry Of The Church Case Study

    2029 Words  | 9 Pages

    The Teaching Ministry of the Church: a. How do you judge something as biblical or not biblical? What do you think of the thought experiment suggested by the author of this chapter? (Respond as if the author of the book you are teaching is in your audience.) We can judge something as biblical or non-biblical by comparing it to the standard, the Holy Bible. We have many tools to assist us in discerning whether something is biblical, but the most important is prayer or talking to God. We must not be

  • How To Read The Bible For All Its Worth Summary

    1758 Words  | 8 Pages

    study the Bible, while accepting that there is value in both formal equivalence and free translations, such as The Message Version, in helping one understand scripture. When reading this chapter, it is clear that the authors affirm the use of other biblical translations, but you also notice there is a strong support for dynamic equivalence and for the New International Version (NIV), The New Revised Standard Version (NRSV) and Today’s New International Version (TNIV). Analysis Starting in chapter

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