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    Berbers in North Africa

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    Berbers in North Africa The modern-day region of Maghrib - the Arab "West" consisting of present-day Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia - is inhabited predominantly by Muslim Arabs, but it has a large Berber minority. North Africa served as a transit region for peoples moving toward Europe or the Middle East. Thus, the region's inhabitants have been influenced by populations from other areas. Out of this mix developed the Berber people, whose language and culture, although

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    The Moor in the Works of William Shakespeare

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    distinctly African, or Moorish heritage. Whether these persons were of Negro, Berber, Spanish, or Arab descent is definitely in question. The use of the term Moor also is of importance. This word is used to describe Aaron and Othello, but not to describe Caliban or the Prince of Morocco, both who come from areas classically referred to as being Moorish. The origin of the word Moor comes from the word mauri. Mauri refers to the Berbers w... ... middle of paper ... ...ntic Review. 55.4 (1990): 1-17.

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    significant player in the trans-Saharan trade. The town’s architecture is designed in such a way so that the incredible heat stays out of the city walls. The town is surrounded by date trees that help keep the town cool and within those trees the people of Ghadamès built houses of using tradition mud, lime, brick, and palm methods. The houses are all tightly packed together and are vertically built. The vertical architecture allows for more houses in a smaller space and multiple floor levels in a

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    libya

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    country has few natural resources. But the discovery of petroleum in 1959 injected huge sums of money into Libya's economy. The government of Libya used some of this wealth to improve farmland and provide services for the people. Almost all of Libya's people are of mixed Arab and Berber ancestry and are Muslims. Until the early 1900's, Libya consisted of three separate geographical and historical regions. It became a united, independent country in 1951. Libya's official name is the Great Socialist People's

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    paper research

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    for more than a thousand years. Today’s Maghreb consists of five countries: Algeria, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, and Tunisia. Most of the indigenous population regard themselves as Arabs, though there are also many non-Arabs, too. Those include the Berbers, who also regard the Maghreb as their homeland. The region’s language is predominantly Arabic, but to better facilitate international trade and business activities, major languages such as English French, and Italian are also spoken in some Maghreb

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    Role of the US in Achieving Democracy It is important that the United States makes significant efforts to encourage the progression of the road to democracy in the Maghreb. That is especially so for Tunisia, which “has made it farther down the road to democracy than any other Arab Spring country” (Coleman Apr. 2014). For that reason, it merits close and urgent support from the West, to serve as a demonstration model for the other Maghreb states and for the Arab world at large. Tunisia’s new constitution

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    Moroccan Food Essay

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    Moroccan Food: Uniqueness, Influences, and Culture Emily Pichardo Professor Ilkay Cal Poly Pomona 1 June 2015 Moroccan Food: Uniqueness, Influences, and Culture History of Culture: The Moroccan food culture is very unique and enticing through sight, smell, and taste in ways that many other cuisines cannot fulfill, all of which is due to its history and influences over the years. Morocco is located in Northern Africa right by the Mediterranean Sea. It 's location has been a great influence on both

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    St. Augustine of Hippo, Bishop and Theologian

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    St. Augustine, Bishop of Hippo, was one of the greatest theologians of his time. He is still regarded in the highest manner. He was raised in a divided home, but through time he found the truth. He was always a superb student. He fully mastered Latin; however, he never grasped Greek. He was also very crafty in speech - a black-belt of rhetoric if you will. After his teenage flings and rebellions, he found a heretical sect in which he became involved for a while. He traveled and landed in Milan for

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    Battuta’s family was made of judges, including himself, so this was a simple and ideal occupation for him. Representatives from the locations were absorbed by Battuta because he was a Qadi (judge) as well. Ibn was positively supported by the majority of people. However, as he gained more advocates, he supposedly became greedy and self-centered. Battuta was placed in a good situation to gain this trend. If Battuta continued to attract the following who desired to aid him while on the road, he ultimately

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    Libyan Insurgency Analysis

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    step in the process is to examine whether the government is corrupt and if it has the legitimacy of the people. The Libyan originally backed the rule of Qaddafi and supported his actions. The government was corrupt based on the fact that certain families and people retained most of the power. They also censored the media to control what the public knew about the government was doing to its people who even thought about change. Anyone who came to challenge his authority was not just assassinated but

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