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    Battle of Hattin

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    In 1187, 88 years after the fall of the Jerusalem to the Crusaders, the Franks were defeated in a disastrous battle at Hattin. This battle pitted bitter rivals in Saladin and his Muslim army and the Frankish army under King Guy of Jerusalem. After several days of skirmishes and a day of intense fighting Saladin would emerge victorious. Almost all of Guy’s army of around 20,000 Christians would be killed or captured including Guy himself, though he would be released later. What caused this terrible

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    Hattin: Trapping a Victory On June 26, 1187, the Muslim Sultan Saladin crossed the river Jordan with 20,000 of his followers - an army consisting of roughly 12,000 light horsemen and a number of footmen to a location south of the Sea of Galilee where he and his men encamped. They had been ravaging the nearby countryside in hopes of provoking a Christian attack, but had been unsuccessful. The Frankish Christians led by King Guy in Jerusalem had also mobilized their own army and camped at the

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    How Effective Was Saladin as a Leader?

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    the crusades. The topics that will be addressed are the Battle of Hattin in 1187 and the Ayyubid Dynasty. During the battle of Hattin, Saladin captured the king of Jerusalem and killed him after defeating the crusader army. This investigation will focus on the time period of 1137 to 1193 and the places investigated will include Egypt, Syria and North Africa. This will be accomplished through a thorough examination of Saladin’s leadership, battle tactics, and people skills. Part B:

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    Saladin

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    Syria, Alleppo, Mawsil and Iraq, and taking them under his control. While Saladin was building up his power, he gerenally avoided any conflict with the Crusader kingdom, even though whenever he fought them, he defeated them. One exception was the Battle of Montgisard on November 25, 1177.

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    The Third Crusade

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    territory. The most significant event he ever took part in was the Battle of Hattin. After a Reynald of Chatillion attacked a large Muslim caravan, Saladin declared war on the Christians. Because the Christians had no water resources and were not used to the land, Saladin sneakily waited for Guy of Chatillion, the King of Jerusalem, to command his army to fight Saladin. Guy of Chatillion's army essentially fought a hopeless battle. The whole army was either killed or captured, and those "who could

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    this fortress there is because it is on the side of a mountain meaning there would be less paths to defend when the enemy attacks as well as many natural defenses at our advantage. Throughout this reports, we will have an analysis of the areas of battle, the breakdown of Templar forces as well as main advancements that we will have in our castle. The Middle East was in the midst of many crusades during the 11th and 12th century. The main enemies of Saladin’s forces were King Richard I and the Knight’s

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    Crusades

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    Crusades The chapter on The Crusades gives the proper dates of the Holy War, yet does not discuss in detail the information it has. The text is watered down for the grade level and it is written from a Western European viewpoint. A viewpoint that never discusses the feelings and motives of those who were being attacked. The chapter emphasizes the Christian's motives for starting The Crusades as a way to defend their territories and to "free the Holy Land from the Muslim infidels" (Armento

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    Muslims, as indicated by a cross on Crusaders’ clothing.” (Voyages in World History, pg. 359). Jews, Muslims and groups of none Christians were the targets of the Crusades within Europe. The pope promised all the crusaders that if they died during battle that “they could be certain that God would forgive their sins because God forgave all pilgrims’ sins.” (Voyages in World History, pg. 360). The mark of the beginning of the first crusade was in 1095 and only 10,000 out of 50,000 combatants reached

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    The Effects of the Crusade The Crusades were formed in 1095 through 1291. It was believed that the idea was sparked from the sermon that was preached by Pope Urban II at Clermont-Ferrand in November 1095. When armies of Christians from Western Europe responded to the plea of Pope Urban II to go to war against Muslim forces in the Holy Land. Their main purpose was to recapture the Holy Land. They also wanted to reunite the Christian Church, increase prestige of the Church, and reduce feudal

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    Richard the Lionhearted

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    The Crusades intentions were to take back the Holy Land (Jerusalem). Jerusalem had been taken by the First Crusade and the European’s kingdom was built on its ruins. Almost one hundred years later Jerusalem had been taken back by Saladin at the Battle of Hattin and the Crusade army had been destroyed. It was time for new Crusaders and a leader that can match Saladin’s power. The Third Crusade took two year to gather and send out to recapture Jerusalem. Saladin was the essences of chivalry he was a

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