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    (heart attack), and consequently Todd writes, "What that means is that any day I may fall quickly dead, without warning - perhaps before I complete this sentence, perhaps twenty years from now."2 Although this may seem to be a purely literal device, Barth is using Todd's heightened awareness of the delicateness of his own life as an exaggerated symbol for the vulnerability of all human life. This early focus upon the heart continues due to the centrality in the novel's plot of Todd's decision to

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    Romans 1.17 Analysis

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    Luther What is Luther’s understanding of the “righteousness of/from God?” Luther believes when we believe in God and are baptized, we receive the righteousness of God. God makes us justified when we believe in Him and His word. He says we can’t just do good things and that will give us God’s righteousness. We have to believe and have faith. He says the believing comes first then we do things like spreading God’s word then makes us more justified. 2. For Luther, what is the relationship between

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    The reader of a metafiction raises the question-which is the real world? The ontology of “any fiction is justified/validated/vindicated in the context of various theories of representation in the field of literary art and practice. Among these theories the seminal and the most influential is the mimetic theory. The theory of mimesis (imitation) posits that there is a world out there, a world in which we all live and act, which we call “the real world”. What fiction does (for that matter any art)

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    presented in the bible. It is important to realize that there are many views pertaining to the doctrine of election ranging from prominent theologians such as Augustine and Pelagius, Calvin and Arminius, Barth and Brunner and various other theologians and their respective counterparts. Karl Barth and Emil Brunner are the giants on the subject of modern theology. Their theological insights are such that even now people are mesmerized by their incredible aptitude for theological understanding and presentation

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    Charles W. Chestnutt's The Marrow of Tradition Clearly, one can expect differing critical views of a novel; from the author's perspective we see one view, from a publisher's another, and from the reviewer's yet another. This is especially true of Charles W. Chesnutt's  The Marrow of Tradition. If one observes both the contemporary reviews of the novel and letters exchanged between Chesnutt and his friends and publisher, Houghton, Mifflin, and Co., one will see the disparity

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    How Do Ethnic Boundries Affect Assimilation

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    question: what are ethnic boundaries and how do they fit into the discussion of assimilation?, is something that is considered in the book. However, Alba and Nee are not the only writers to have an opinion on the subject of ethnic boundaries; Fredrik Barth in his piece Ethnic Groups and Boundaries expounds on the ideas of ethnic boundaries and what they mean to society. Therefore, it is useful to compare and contrast the two differing opinions in order to understand the full scope of information on ethnic

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    Metafiction and JM Coetzee's Foe

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    post-modern fiction and has been the source of heated debate on whether its employ marks the death or the rebirth of the novel. A dominant theme in post-modern fiction, the term "metafiction" has been defined by literary critics in multiple ways. John Barth offers perhaps the most simplified definition: metafiction is "a novel that imitates a novel rather than the real world." Patricia Waugh extends our understanding to add that it is "fictional writing which self-consciously and systematically draws

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    Writing Against Death in The Floating Opera

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    digressions are impossible to contain, and that makes it hard for him to concentrate on a particular line of narration; every image he creates breeds other images, words bring about other words, there being no end to "new figures and new chases" (Barth 2). This remark suggests that Todd's existence is, indeed, confined to the reality he forges by telling his tale; this fictitious reality regenerates itself. The tone of the passage also implies that Todd enjoys not a little the unprecedented freedom

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    Italo Calvino as Author/Game-master in If On a Winter's Night a Traveler In an interview conducted in January 1978, one year before the publication of his novel If on a winter's night a traveler (Iown), Italo Calvino responded to a question about his future writing plans with these words: "What I keep open is fiction, a storytelling that is lively and inventive, as well as the more reflective kind of writing in which narrative and essay become one" (Calvino, Hermit in Paris 190). Calvino created

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    In 1967, John Barth wrote an essay which characterized modern literature in a state of exhaustion ,a “used-up” form. The ultimate question then was: What do we do with literature? Barth’s answer suggested that we present narrators that are aware of themselves, as well as the exhaustion of their medium. Also, that we reorient and give new meaning to stories that have already been told, such as the greek myths the second half of the novel focuses on. Meta-fiction is defined as fiction that includes

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    Some of the dominant features of postmodern fictions include temporal disorder, the erosion of the sense of time, a foregrounding of words as fragmenting material signs, a pervasive and pointless use of pastiche, loose association of ideas, paranoia and the creation of vicious circles or a loss of destination between separate levels of discourse, which are all symptoms of the language disorders of postmodernist fictions. The postmodern novel may be summed up as: • Late modernism. • Anti-modernism

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    The Visible and Invisible Church in Karl Barth and Henri De Lubac Since the Reformation there has been a question of what is the nature of the Church. Is it visible, invisible or both? Karl Barth and Henri de Lubac both try to answer this question. Barth believes that Church is visible in as much as it is a human community and invisible in the reality of the faith that forms it. De Lubac agrees with Barth this far, yet De Lubac takes his theology to a higher level. In that the Church also participates

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    The relevance of the Liberal, Neo-orthodox, and Evangelical Views In the 18th century to 19th century, there were many great influential leaders of Christianity that influenced many individuals belief systems. During this time period three great movements included the relevance of liberalism, Neo-orthodoxy, and Evangelical views. These views in particular had great influence over how individuals applied biblical scripture to their everyday life. The Issues The nature and authority of scripture

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    The Legend of Pulau Ubin The story I chose to consider was about one of the small islands that surround Singapore, Pulau Ubin. This is a small island whose main industries are mining and tourism, including trails for biking and hiking. The island has an interesting past, and as a result it now has many legends and myths revolving around it. During the occupation of the Singapore by the Japanese, it was said to be where they had brought soldiers to be tortured. That is a significant reason why

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    The Falkland Islands' Conflict

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    No one really knows who discovered the Falkland Islands. Nearly every British historian will insist that the English explorer John Davis discovered the islands in 1592(1) while Argentineans typically credit Vespucci, Magellan, or Sebald de Weert. (2) The events of January 2, 1883 are not in dispute, however. On this date, James Onslow, captain of the HMS Clio, dropped anchor just off the Falklands. The next day he went ashore and raised the British flag. (3) This action infuriated the Argentines

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    Origins of the Pacific

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    arrived on these islands. Jacob Roggeveen thought that the Spaniards might have brought them to the islands, but they lacked any Spanish influence. Then he thought perhaps the "islanders might be direct descendants of Adam and Eve, who had bred there naturally from generation to generation, but finally decided that the ability of human understanding is powerless to comprehend how these people ever reached the island. Another view was by Andrew Sharp, his hypothesis states "the islands of Polynesia had

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    'The Man Who Loved Islands'. We have been requested to concentrate on six individual areas, and focus them into one large evaluation. Lawrence begins the text by ensuring that the reader understands that he is trying to involve them in the piece - by using the word 'our'. This makes the reader feel as if the story means much more to them, because they are actually 'involved' in it, and not just reading it. Lawrence continues on to describe the features of the island: he begins by using

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    Boracay Island

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    place to visit on the face of this planet; the island paradise of Boracay in the Philippines. Boracay Island combines crystal clear waters, sugary beaches that squeak, and lush hilly landscapes into an idyllic tourist haven, that's guaranteed to fascinate anyone into tranquil harmony with its simplistic beauty. Boracay is a breath-taking, unbelievably magical Island. A spectacular paradise set in the unspoiled South China Seas. Boracay Island is a paradise indeed. The beach is amazing with

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    Brave New World

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    Brave New World by Aldous Huxley is a novel that takes place in Utopia. Yet in this ideal place everyone is conditioned to be happy, it is a place where various things such as the arts are restricted so all people will be synchronized in thinking. Love and commitment does not exist but rather everyone belongs to everyone else. This place is also a place where soma holidays help people escape from their realities and never have its society feel any kind of distress or illness. This place was not Utopia

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    Comparing and Contrasting Two Opposite Worlds

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    The earth matures and changes every day; therefore, the life which lives upon its surface develops with it. Because communication and story telling has always had an immense importance, literature has had a vital impact on everyday life all throughout history. Each day as the earth changes, so does literature, thus explaining why personality traits of characters and the setting in which novels take place are modified every day and shift with every time period. However, even when written in different

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