Free Bahá'í teachings Essays and Papers

Sort By:
Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays

Free Bahá'í teachings Essays and Papers

Page 1 of 50 - About 500 essays
  • Good Essays

    Gay and Christian

    • 927 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 5 Works Cited

    taught theory; lecture or other. In this recording I am going to discuss my thoughts from a panel discussion that I attended in the Belfast Bible College. The panel was made up from 3 people, Geraldine who works for the YMCA, Jamie who is from the Baha'i faith and Gail who has experience working in both faith based and secular youth provision. Understanding What was the main message? What did I understand was being said by the author; lecturer; practitioner etc… What argument was used to support

    • 927 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 5 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The Baha'i Faith

    • 2128 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Baha'i Baha’i is a fairly new faith dating back to the mid-nineteenth century. However, since then more than 7 million people, world wide have joined this faith. This leaves one to wonder how this faith came to be one of the world religions in such a short period of time. This paper will examine this thought and many others such as the history, beliefs, and traditions. History The followers of Baha’is emerged from Iranians who had formerly been Shi’i Muslims (Smith, 1999). According to Breuilly,

    • 2128 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Baha’i Faith

    • 884 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The Baha’i Faith is the newest of the Abrahamic monotheistic faiths. In Baha’i Faith, there is one and only one God, meaning there is no Trinity. God is the one that created the world and everything that is on it. God is too great and subtle for human beings; therefore humans cannot capture a clear picture or have a full understand of God. One cannot see God at all because God does not have a body nor does he take shape in human flesh. One can learn about God through prayer, meditation, and study

    • 884 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Bahai Faith

    • 1668 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Bahai Faith The Bahá'í Faith proclaims itself to be the youngest of the independent world religions. Its roots stem from Iran during the mid-nineteenth century. This new faith is primarily based on the founder, Bahá'u'lláh, meaning 'the Glory of God'. Bahá'ís (the believers) in many places around the world have been heavily persecuted for their beliefs and differences and have been branded by many as a cult, a reform movement and/or a sect of the Muslim religion. The Bahá'í Faith is unique in

    • 1668 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Baha Essay

    • 870 Words
    • 2 Pages

    ever heard of Baha’i? I know I haven’t and I’m sure if I was to ask someone, they would look at me crazy. Believe it or not, Baha’i is a religion. This monotheistic religion is the youngest independent religion in the world. It was founded in the mid nineteenth century by the Great Mirza Husayn Ali. He was the son of a government minister in Iran (Cole 25). His name too many people is known as Baha’u’llah. He is the most recent in line of the Messengers of God. The term Baha’i is used to represent

    • 870 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Best Essays

    Introduction Baha’i faith is one of the most youngest and independent faiths of this world. According to Baha’i faith, since the requirements of human society and the needs of this world are changing, continuation of religions is necessary and it is one of the most important principles of the faith. Baha’is believe that Baha’u’llah (1817-1892) the founder of the faith is the newest Divine messenger of the God after Abraham, Moses, Buddha, Zoroaster, Jesus, and Muhammad. The centre of Baha’i teaching is based

    • 1919 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 14 Works Cited
    Best Essays
  • Best Essays

    The Baha'i Faith

    • 2740 Words
    • 6 Pages
    • 10 Works Cited

    conflicting truth-claims. Yet, as globalization ascends, religions have been increasingly exposed to other competing religious assertions. Religious philosopher John Hicks has evaluated these changes for the modern spiritual world. Juan Cole, a well- known Baha’i follower and scholar, summarizes Hick’s model for the existing three attitudes towards differing world religions: (1) exclusivists, who see only one mode of religious thought (their own) as true and the others as false; (2) inclusivists, who maintain

    • 2740 Words
    • 6 Pages
    • 10 Works Cited
    Best Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Baha'i International Archives Building and Its Classical Style of Greek Architecture The Baha'i International Archives Building, erected in 1957 on Mount Carmel in Haifa Israel, echoes the immortal classical style of Greek architecture. An admirer of Greek architecture, Shogi Effendi who was the Guardian of the Baha'i faith, chose this style to carry out the construction of the Archives building. This building replicates the general proportions of the famous Parthenon in Athens, Greece.

    • 947 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    In it's infancy, humanity relied on religion and it played a crucial role in the shaping of society. The organizing of people in front of one leader helped guide the unruly masses to collaborate and coexist. However, humanity no longer needs its hand held to get through the dark times. At some point we must take responsibility for our actions, both at a personal level and as a society. Religion has become the justification for countless murders, decades of war, and a plethora of other despicable

    • 1032 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    (pg.292) “How dear, how soothing to man, arises the idea of God, peopling the lonely place, effacing the scars of our mistakes and disappointments! When we have broken our god of tradition and ceased from our god of rhetoric, then may God fire the heart with his presence.” There is a sharp contrast between a god of perception and the God of the universal over- soul. A god of perception is one defined by the senses or unstable, biased opinion and because of this is flawed like our senses. When analyzing

    • 1682 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Powerful Essays
Previous
Page12345678950