Free Bahá'í Faith Essays and Papers

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Free Bahá'í Faith Essays and Papers

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    The Baha’i Faith

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    The Baha’i Faith is the newest of the Abrahamic monotheistic faiths. In Baha’i Faith, there is one and only one God, meaning there is no Trinity. God is the one that created the world and everything that is on it. God is too great and subtle for human beings; therefore humans cannot capture a clear picture or have a full understand of God. One cannot see God at all because God does not have a body nor does he take shape in human flesh. One can learn about God through prayer, meditation, and study

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    The Baha'i Faith

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    religious globalization patterns point to trends in the growth of inter-faith dialogue. The prevailing opinion in most traditions has long been that differing world religions assert conflicting truth-claims. Yet, as globalization ascends, religions have been increasingly exposed to other competing religious assertions. Religious philosopher John Hicks has evaluated these changes for the modern spiritual world. Juan Cole, a well- known Baha’i follower and scholar, summarizes Hick’s model for the existing

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    The Baha'i Faith

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    Baha'i Baha’i is a fairly new faith dating back to the mid-nineteenth century. However, since then more than 7 million people, world wide have joined this faith. This leaves one to wonder how this faith came to be one of the world religions in such a short period of time. This paper will examine this thought and many others such as the history, beliefs, and traditions. History The followers of Baha’is emerged from Iranians who had formerly been Shi’i Muslims (Smith, 1999). According to Breuilly,

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    Has one ever wondered how to thank someone who was the single most influential person during those fragile first eighteen years of life, and that was there to contain the solidified inconsistencies of society by showing constant love with no conditions that will never erode its stance? In Backpack Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, Drama, and Writing it shows Robert Hayden a poet as an angry child in an annoyed household had no idea what the meaning of unconditional love was, yet as

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    Bahai Faith

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    Bahai Faith The Bahá'í Faith proclaims itself to be the youngest of the independent world religions. Its roots stem from Iran during the mid-nineteenth century. This new faith is primarily based on the founder, Bahá'u'lláh, meaning 'the Glory of God'. Bahá'ís (the believers) in many places around the world have been heavily persecuted for their beliefs and differences and have been branded by many as a cult, a reform movement and/or a sect of the Muslim religion. The Bahá'í Faith is unique

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    Introduction Baha’i faith is one of the most youngest and independent faiths of this world. According to Baha’i faith, since the requirements of human society and the needs of this world are changing, continuation of religions is necessary and it is one of the most important principles of the faith. Baha’is believe that Baha’u’llah (1817-1892) the founder of the faith is the newest Divine messenger of the God after Abraham, Moses, Buddha, Zoroaster, Jesus, and Muhammad. The centre of Baha’i teaching

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    Sociological Portrait M. Foster

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    We are all the product of our sociological environments. Millions of different things combine to make millions of different combinations, resulting in unique individuals that can potentially find something in common with anyone that has a shared sociological background. This includes race, gender, education experiences, social status, sexual orientation, societal roles, familial expectations, and so on. What I have experienced is what has made me who I am and how I live my life is a result of what

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    Baha Essay

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    ever heard of Baha’i? I know I haven’t and I’m sure if I was to ask someone, they would look at me crazy. Believe it or not, Baha’i is a religion. This monotheistic religion is the youngest independent religion in the world. It was founded in the mid nineteenth century by the Great Mirza Husayn Ali. He was the son of a government minister in Iran (Cole 25). His name too many people is known as Baha’u’llah. He is the most recent in line of the Messengers of God. The term Baha’i is used to represent

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    In it's infancy, humanity relied on religion and it played a crucial role in the shaping of society. The organizing of people in front of one leader helped guide the unruly masses to collaborate and coexist. However, humanity no longer needs its hand held to get through the dark times. At some point we must take responsibility for our actions, both at a personal level and as a society. Religion has become the justification for countless murders, decades of war, and a plethora of other despicable

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    Defining Glory

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    The theological mysteries of the divine being of God are evident to all who explore His inexplicable qualities. Even Herman Melville, a man starkly opposed to the idea of God, had questions for Him. In Billy Budd, Melville asks one of these curious questions. By sending Billy Budd, an innocent, good-natured sailor, to a ship where he would be condemned to death for an accidental crime, Melville asks why a good God would create man and place him on earth, knowing he would sin and be condemned to death

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