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Free Autistic Essays and Papers

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    Autistic Savants

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    “Autistic Savants” Autism is a biological disorder that affects a child’s motor and social skills. These children cannot work in social settings like school and so many of them feel left out not because they are different, but because they don’t know how to interact with others. It seems that everyone knows about autism very well; however, there are some children who are autistic yet they have a very special ability in one area. These children are called autistic savants. Autistic savants are

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    child, I often avoided confrontation by keeping my opinions to myself, no matter how offensive someone was. But when someone directed negative comments toward my autistic brother who could not defend himself, I lost my self-control. Witnessing the struggles Bo has gone through, I feel it is cruel and ignominious to belittle the battles autistic children deal with daily. I share this story to help disclose the need to treat others with the courtesy we all deserve. I never felt embarrassed by Bo

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    autism

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    is an estimated 400,000 autistic people in the U.S. from any ethnic or racial background. The social, emotional, and financial costs of autism to the family and to state or federal agencies is very high. Autism affects its victims in a wide variety of ways. Some do well in special supportive environments, other are completely independent and function fairly well, and still others may never learn to talk or be able to work or live independently. It is common for an autistic person to avoid being touched

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    High-Functioning Autism through Rain Man

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    is a high-functioning autistic, functions in his little world that he has created. Manifestations of autism such as this indicate to people how an autistic was seen as “like a wolf” (Pollak 258) in older definitions. Recently, though, people are beginning to understand that the problem is organic, or biologically based, as opposed to the psychogenic, or psychologically based, hypothesis of the past. With the release of Rain Man came the increased understanding of autistics and a willingness to

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    Autism

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    times more common in males than in females. It most cited statistic is that autism occurs in 4.5 out of 10,000 live births. The estimate of children having autistic qualities is reported to be 15 to 20 out of 10,000. The gender statement noted before is not uncommon, since many developmental disabilities have a greater male to female ratio. Autistic characteristics are different from birth. Two more common characteristics that may be exhibited are the arching of the back while being held, to avoid contact

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    between and healthy brain and the brain of an autistic person. By finding structural differences such as size and composition, the role that the structures play in the behavior of the autistic can be inferred while also investigating the normal functions of brain structures. There are several differences between a healthy brain and the brain of an autistic person. Dr. Joseph Piven from the University of Iowa noticed a size difference . In the autistic brain, the cerebellum is larger and the corpus

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    Autism: A Lack of the I-function

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    Autism: A Lack of the I-function In the words of Uta Frith, a proclaimed expert on autism, autistic persons lack the underpinning "special feature of the human mind: the ability to reflect on itself." ((3)) And according to our recent discussions in class, the ability to reflect on one's internal state is the job of a specific entity in the brain known as the I-function. Could it be that autism is a disease of this part of the mind, a damage or destruction to these specialized groups of neurons

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    Autism

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    about his activity. I was later told the boy {my brother} was autistic,” says Tamara Robinson in an interview. Autism is “a syndrome of childhood characterized by a lack of social relationship, a lack of communication abilities, persistent compulsive, rituals, and resistance to change” (Paluszny 1). For centuries, medical professionals have tried to understand autism and its origin. The above example shows only a few examples of autistic behavior. The history of autism extends, as far back as the late

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    The Etiology of Autism

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    in this area found that autistic patients had enlarged lateral ventricles, however, this abnormality didn’t reveal any damage to a specific anatomical site. The most recent studies conducted on the cerebella of autistic patients showed much more dramatic results. In one specific experiment conducted by Dr. Courchesne, the cerebellar lobules of eighteen autistic patients were compared with the lobules of twelve subjects within a normal control group. The eighteen autistic patients were chosen on

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    non-scientists reading for interest—her article is people-oriented, follows an enticing and engaging structure, and provides new, clear, fascinating detail on a significant topic. Scientists are gaining a new understanding of how the brains of autistic individuals work. Their discoveries have led many to believe that early intervention may reduce the severity of the disorder. The brain continues to develop after birth. Therefore, early damage can often be compensated for if another part of the

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