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    Biography of St. Augustine of Hippo

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    Saint Augustine Saint Augustine (354-430) better known by Augustine of Hippo was a North African native. Most of his life was spent as a Christian bishop at Hippo Regius, North Africa, it was also where he earned his common name Augustine of Hippo. He was born in a small town named Tagaste (modern Algeria) and lived a morally life as his thoughts on life changes as he ages. Although he lived through tough times, throughout his life, he was most famously known for his autobiography (Confessions),

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    A Review of Peter Brown’s Augustine of Hippo Peter Brown’s Augustine of Hippo is a dense, scholarly work outlining the entire life of the Catholic bishop.  The University of California Press in Berkeley, California published the work in 1967.  My version was the 1973 second paperback printing, found in the University library.  Its smallish, scholarly, serifed, typewritten font allows for a instant respect for the subject matter:  the words are at first imposing, but then revealing as their serious

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    St. Augustine of Hippo, Bishop and Theologian

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    St. Augustine, Bishop of Hippo, was one of the greatest theologians of his time. He is still regarded in the highest manner. He was raised in a divided home, but through time he found the truth. He was always a superb student. He fully mastered Latin; however, he never grasped Greek. He was also very crafty in speech - a black-belt of rhetoric if you will. After his teenage flings and rebellions, he found a heretical sect in which he became involved for a while. He traveled and landed in Milan for

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    Augustine of Hippo (354-430) is among the most influential thinkers in Christianity. He contributed a great number of ideas and notions to Christian theology that would have lasting effect on belief systems in Christian churches. One of his most notable contributions is the notion of “original sin” and his concept of “evil.” These notions evolved over the years. Augustine traces their evolution in his Confessions, a thirteen-volume autobiography he wrote when he was in his forties. An essential

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    Early Church Augustine of Hippo - One philosopher that I found interesting was Augustine and his involvement in the early church. "Augustine is acknowledged as having been one of the most important influences on the development of the western Christianity. The theological system he developed dominated the mediaeval church until the thirteenth century and its influence is still felt today (Bradshaw, 2009)." In researching his life, I found interesting facts that originally he did have a Christian

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    A biography on Saint Augustine is not our primary concern on this writing but, since he was the most important Christian theoretician in the late Roman Empire in the elaboration as stated Marvin Perry in his book, Western Civilization: “A Brief History” (117). It is relevant to stress out that his explanation of the origin of the unity of the human race has evoked the most pertinent questions. Augustine of Hippo or Saint Augustine was born on November 13th, 354 in Tagaste, Algeria then died on August

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    Augustine of Hippo, also known as Saint Augustine, is one of the most important and well-known theologians in the history of the Christian religion. Augustine has one of the most powerful conversions ever in the Church, a change of belief and behavior, which led to his most influential written work, Confessions. A writer and thinker, Augustine's treatises, sermons and letters number into the hundreds. He put his gifted mind to work on subjects such as grace, the Truth, sexuality and free will. Augustine's

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    Father of Neoplatonism The Ever Lasting Effects of Saint Augustine of Hippo By Ethan Seselja - 0608465 Early life of Saint Augustine: Saint Augustine of Hippo was born on the 13th of November 354 AD to his mother, Saint Monica. He was born into a small African town and right from childhood knew of the religious differences overwhelming the Roman Empire. Even within his own household these differences reined; for his father was a devout pagan honouring old Punic Gods and his mother, by the very nature

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    AUGUSTINE AND THE EARLY CHURCH

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    Augustine and the Early Church Augustine of Hippo by Peter Brown Live Oak Public Library, STACKS 270.2 BROW Q5. In Augustine’s unfailing attempt to fight the heresies that plagued the early church, he realized that much of his colleagues and congregation lived by unquestioned faith in the Catholic Church. He also realized that this left them without a strong foundation for which they believed. (Brown, 354) His contributions to the written theological doctrines of Catholicism helped to strengthen

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    are now considered canon by neither Jews nor Protestants. However, at the Council of Trent in 1546, Catholics declared 11 of the Apocryphal books canonical. Catholics do not accept as canon 1st and 2nd Esdras, or the Prayer of Manasseh. St. Augustine of Hippo was a major proponent among the early church fathers for the Apocrypha, and he listed forty-four canonical books. Roman Catholics have put forward many reasons for supporting a canonical Apocrypha, but I will only focus on four. Firstly, the

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