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    The Human Auditory System

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    Introduction The human auditory system is incredibly accurate in identifying signal content, location, and meaning through discrete neurological processes. The accuracy of these processes begins at the external, anatomical portions of the auditory pathway: the pinna and ear canal. The pinna serves to collect sound from the environment and generate direction-dependent cues through spectral transformations (Hofman, et al, 1998; Raykar, et al, 2005). Sounds that are funneled into the ear canal contain

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    peripheral and central auditory systems to be exact. The way each works is pretty simple, with the peripheral having the outer, middle, and inner ear. The central system on the other hand has only two functions because it goes from the cochlear nucleus and works its way up to the primary auditory complex. Each section is shaped in such a precise way as to better help the next step which is what I’m going to try to explain without messing up too much. What the auditory system in full does is take a

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    Music Appreciation and the Auditory System

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    Music Appreciation and the Auditory System Have you ever come home after an exhausting day and turned on music to relax your nerves? While you are taking it easy, your auditory cortex is not. It works hard to synthesize the several musical elements of rhythm, pitch, frequency, and timbre to create a rich auditory experience. First, a discussion of the ear physiology is needed. Vibrating air moving at different frequencies hits the eardrum which causes the middle ear's three bones to move

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    The human auditory system is a sequential network of multiple acoustic parts enabling sounds to be received and communicated from our surroundings. Sound is defined as waves of pressure arising from the vibration of air molecules (REF). A complex network of sensors in the ear recognise these waves and encode the waves into electrical signals to be processed by the primary auditory cortex in the brain (REF). The human ear is divided into the outer ear, middle ear, and inner ear. The outer ear is made

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    Hello, again. In this section we are going to have a closer look on our auditory system, so as to understand its basic function. Why should we learn about that? Because as listeners, we owe to know some basic things about this magnificent human mechanism. Our auditory system is one of our ‘gates’ to the outer world. It helps us pick up sound stimuli from our environment, transduce these stimuli into neural impulses and finally, carry these impulses to specific locations in the brain. In fact, its

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    Aging and Hearing Loss

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    processing speed, a decline in processing brief acoustic cues (Gordon-Salant & Fitzgibbons, 2001), an age-related decline of temporal processing in general (Gordon-Salant & Fitzgibbons, 1999; Vaughan & Letowski, 1997), the fact that both visual and auditory perception change with age (Helfer, 1998), an interference of mechanical function of the ear, possible sensorineural hearing loss due to damage to receptors over time (Scheuerle, 2000), or a decline in the processing of sounds in midbrain (Ochert

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    The Amazing Ear

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    The Middle Ear The next question is how does the ear take this sound wave, which are simply vibrations of air particles, and get them past the air-fluid interface between the outer ear and inner ear? The middle ear has important structures that help amplify a sound wave that is being funneled in from the outer ear and transfer the energy to the inner ear. The tympanic membrane, which is also known as the eardrum sits between the ear canal and the middle ear. Behind the eardrum are the ossicles and

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    Hearing underwater

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    ear’s purpose is to convert sound waves into nerve impulses then the brain perceive these impulses as sound. The human ear can perceive sound in the range of 20 to 20,000 Hz. Three distinct areas in the human ear which are responsible of the auditory system process, outer ear, middle ear, and the inner ear. First, the outer ear channels transform the sound waves through the ear canal to the eardrum. The eardrum is a thin membrane stretched in the inner end of the canal. Air pressure which caused

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    modifies the energy and a receptor transduces the energy into a neural response. The sensory nerves transfer the coded activity to the central nervous system, while the thalamus processes and then relays the neural responses. Lastly, the cerebral cortex receives input and produces the sensation and perception from the brain. Energy in the auditory system contains information about the world. This energy has a stimulus which comes from sound waves like ripples on a pond. The type of energy that this is

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    the entire health care team, as well as any individual who comes into contact with this child. Everyone in the child’s surrounding must focus on aural rehabilitation immediately post implantation. A service described by ASHA to include “training in auditory perception, using visual cues, improving speech, developing language, managing communication, and managing hearing aids and assistive listening devices” (ASHA). This vague description gives way to many different strategies, and subsequently leads

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